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You searched for subject:(Prostitution Colorado). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Taylor, Julie Lynn. Prostitute, victim, survivor, woman: examining the discursive structures surrounding women in sex trafficking situations.

Degree: MA, Communication Studies, 2010, Colorado State University

Within the realm of sex trafficking, the discourse that describes women often floats between naming the women as victims or as agents. To be an agent assumes that women are complying prostitutes. To be a victim assumes that the women are being put in the situation against their will. Significantly, the perpetrator rarely is discussed. Moreover, in most descriptions, the woman is described as the lone actor in the rape and its aftermath. Interviews were conducted with four different organizations within Colorado that understand and describe sex trafficking situations in unique ways. Through the interview data, discursive connections and discrepancies were illuminated, allowing for the researcher to follow the flow of discourse among organizations. In this study, the consequences of these descriptions, and their impact on voice, agency and space of action, are examined. Advisors/Committee Members: Broadfoot, Kirsten J. (advisor), Griffin, Cindy L. (committee member), Coke, Pamela K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Human trafficking  – Colorado; Sex crimes  – Colorado; Prostitution  – Colorado

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, J. L. (2010). Prostitute, victim, survivor, woman: examining the discursive structures surrounding women in sex trafficking situations. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39126

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Julie Lynn. “Prostitute, victim, survivor, woman: examining the discursive structures surrounding women in sex trafficking situations.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39126.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Julie Lynn. “Prostitute, victim, survivor, woman: examining the discursive structures surrounding women in sex trafficking situations.” 2010. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Taylor JL. Prostitute, victim, survivor, woman: examining the discursive structures surrounding women in sex trafficking situations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39126.

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor JL. Prostitute, victim, survivor, woman: examining the discursive structures surrounding women in sex trafficking situations. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39126


Colorado State University

2. Gunvaldson, Nicholas Ryan. Crimson streets and violent bodies: identity, physicality, and the twilight of Colorado's vice districts.

Degree: MA, History, 2015, Colorado State University

This master’s project focuses on the changing moral and legal status of Colorado’s vice districts during the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The thesis argues that once informally organized vice districts were formally regulated and geographically delineated as “red-light districts” at the behest of middle- and upper-class Progressives near the end of the century they became more vulnerable to actual suppression. This result had not been anticipated. Reformers considered commercial sex an offensive but ineradicable behavior, and they hoped districting would be an effective way to control, document, and tax this vice – while keeping it separate and hidden from respectable society. To the surprise of reformers, the establishment of special vice districts rendered them not only more visible and subject to regulation, but also, more vulnerable to suppression and eradication. This may have seemed like a victory for vice reformers, yet prostitution did not disappear. Rather, the formal elimination of vice districts early in the twentieth century worsened the circumstances in which prostitution was practiced, and widened the differential societal treatment of prostitutes and their customers. Prostitution became more difficult to monitor and prostitutes became more susceptible to control by pimps, organized crime syndicates, and corrupt police. In addition to documenting the emergence and demise of vice districts in Colorado, this project examines the identity and experience of the women and men who frequented vice districts as prostitutes, sexual clients, pimps, and drug dealers. Advisors/Committee Members: Alexander, Ruth (advisor), Lindsay, James (committee member), Hutchins, Zachary (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: identity; prostitution; violence; progressive; Colorado; red light district

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gunvaldson, N. R. (2015). Crimson streets and violent bodies: identity, physicality, and the twilight of Colorado's vice districts. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167115

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gunvaldson, Nicholas Ryan. “Crimson streets and violent bodies: identity, physicality, and the twilight of Colorado's vice districts.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167115.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gunvaldson, Nicholas Ryan. “Crimson streets and violent bodies: identity, physicality, and the twilight of Colorado's vice districts.” 2015. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Gunvaldson NR. Crimson streets and violent bodies: identity, physicality, and the twilight of Colorado's vice districts. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167115.

Council of Science Editors:

Gunvaldson NR. Crimson streets and violent bodies: identity, physicality, and the twilight of Colorado's vice districts. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167115

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