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You searched for subject:(Prosthetic feet). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. -1384-5611. The influence of load carriage and foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee walking.

Degree: MSin Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 2019, University of Texas – Austin

Individuals experience sudden load changes during activities of daily living. This added weight places an increased demand on the muscles providing body support, forward propulsion and balance control. For non-amputees, the mechanical output from the ankle muscles are seamlessly modulated to meet the altered demands of load carriage. However, for individuals with a lower-limb amputation, the stiffness properties of standard-of-care prosthetic feet are constant and do not change with varying load conditions. Thus, lower limb amputees often develop gait asymmetries to compensate for the loss of ankle muscles, which may be exacerbated by load carriage. These asymmetries may increase the risk for developing overuse injuries and osteoarthritis in the intact knee as well as elevate the metabolic cost of walking relative to non-amputees. Unfortunately, it is not well understood how prosthetic foot stiffness and load carriage technique influences joint loading asymmetries during amputee gait. The purpose of this study was to use a forward dynamics simulation framework to assess the influence of load carriage technique and prosthetic foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee gait. Forward dynamics simulations were generated to track experimental amputee walking data for each loading condition (unloaded, with a backpack, and with a frontpack) and prosthetic foot condition (four commercially available elastic energy storage and return (ESAR) feet). The results of these simulations showed that amputees rely on their intact limb as a compensatory strategy to meet the increased demands of carrying a load. Carrying the load in a backpack was found to reduce metabolic cost but increase intact knee joint loading. When varying prosthetic foot stiffness, there was no consistent effect on metabolic cost or knee joint loading in any of the three loading conditions. Future work should focus on designing prosthetic components that help reduce the joint loading asymmetry and elevated metabolic cost during load carriage for lower limb amputees. In addition, the tradeoff between metabolic cost and joint loading should be considered when determining the appropriate load carriage technique. Advisors/Committee Members: Neptune, Richard R. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Musculoskeletal model; Dynamic simulations; Transtibial amputee; Muscle function; Prosthetic feet

…of locomotion, clinicians must choose from a wide range of available prosthetic feet when… …properties of passive prosthetic feet, such as stiffness, are constant and are not modulated with… …keel engages the secondary keel. However, the biomechanical benefits of these prosthetic feet… …joint contact impulses increased relative to NL for all prosthetic feet (Figure 1)… …2013; Esposito and Wilken, 2014). Prosthetic feet with damping properties might also… 

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APA (6th Edition):

-1384-5611. (2019). The influence of load carriage and foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee walking. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/5542

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-1384-5611. “The influence of load carriage and foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee walking.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/5542.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-1384-5611. “The influence of load carriage and foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee walking.” 2019. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-1384-5611. The influence of load carriage and foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee walking. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/5542.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-1384-5611. The influence of load carriage and foot stiffness on knee joint loading and metabolic cost during amputee walking. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/5542

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

2. Zelik, Karl Edward. Passive Energy-Saving Mechanisms in Human Locomotion.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2012, University of Michigan

Humans tend to value economy of locomotion, often choosing movement strategies that help minimize how hard their bodies must work to perform a task. In this thesis I explore passive mechanisms humans use to reduce the metabolic energy consumed by their muscles, specifically due to positive muscle work, which is metabolically expensive compared to negative work or force production. I use a combination of modeling and human movement analysis to investigate how work performed passively by the ankle and by distributed soft tissues can save energy. During normal walking, ankle push-off work provides an economical way to transition between steps. Push-off prior to collision redirects the body’s velocity upward, which reduces the energy dissipated by collision, and the positive muscle work that must be performed to compensate for these losses. Through computational modeling and an experimental study of amputees walking on a variable-stiffness prosthetic foot, I demonstrate that elastic energy storage and return at the ankle can passively perform this energy-saving push-off function. Active muscle work can also be reduced by passive soft tissues, which can perform mechanical work without the metabolic cost. I found that during walking and jump landings people choose to reduce demands on muscles by performing negative soft tissue work during collisions, and through a damped-elastic rebound of soft tissues after collisions. While passive ankle work may seem entirely distinct from wobbling soft tissues, I demonstrate that similar biomechanical principles underlie the benefits of each. To save energy during locomotion one should avoid negative work that is not freely returned, otherwise it requires extra positive muscle work to compensate. Alternatively, passive mechanisms may provide a means to reduce both negative and positive muscle work. However, since economy is not the only factor influencing movement, I also present a jump landing experiment to demonstrate how the amount of work people perform may reflect their subjective valuation of active muscle effort vs. other difficult-to-measure costs, such as pain. Ultimately, the long-term goal is to use these fundamental energy-saving principles elicited through simulation and human movement analysis to inform the design of assistive technology for individuals with locomotor impairments. Advisors/Committee Members: Kuo, Arthur D. (committee member), Ferris, Daniel P. (committee member), Grosh, Karl (committee member), Palmieri-Smith, Riann (committee member), Collins, Steven H. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Human Locomotion; Biomechanics; Mechanical Work; Prosthetic Feet; Soft Tissues; Economy; Mechanical Engineering; Engineering

prosthetic feet, contributions of passive soft tissues to locomotion… …experimental study of amputees walking on a variable-­‐stiffness prosthetic… …Insufficient push-­‐off by the prosthetic foot as a person transitions… …the effect of prosthetic foot mechanics on gait by varying a… …prototype prosthetic foot, which affects the magnitude of prosthetic… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zelik, K. E. (2012). Passive Energy-Saving Mechanisms in Human Locomotion. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/93848

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zelik, Karl Edward. “Passive Energy-Saving Mechanisms in Human Locomotion.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/93848.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zelik, Karl Edward. “Passive Energy-Saving Mechanisms in Human Locomotion.” 2012. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Zelik KE. Passive Energy-Saving Mechanisms in Human Locomotion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/93848.

Council of Science Editors:

Zelik KE. Passive Energy-Saving Mechanisms in Human Locomotion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/93848


University of Texas – Austin

3. Ventura, Jessica Dawn. Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, University of Texas – Austin

Over one million amputees are living in the United States with major lower limb loss (Ziegler-Graham et al. 2008). Lower limb amputation leads to the functional loss of the ankle plantar flexor muscles, which are important contributors to body support, forward propulsion, and leg swing initiation during walking (Neptune et al. 2001; Liu et al. 2006). Effective prosthetic component design is essential for successful rehabilitation of amputees to return to an active lifestyle by partially replacing the functional role of the ankle muscles. The series of experimental and computer simulation studies presented in this research showed that design characteristics of energy storage and return prosthetic ankles, specifically the elastic stiffness, significantly influence residual and intact leg ground reaction forces, knee joint moments, and muscle activity, thus affecting muscle output. These findings highlight the importance of proper prosthetic foot stiffness prescription for amputees to assure effective rehabilitation outcomes. The research also showed that the ankle muscles serve to stabilize the body during turning the center of mass. When amputees turn while supported by their prosthetic components, they rely more on gravity to redirect the center of mass than active muscle generation. This mechanism increases the risks of falling and identifies a need for prosthetic components and rehabilitation focused on increasing amputee stability during turning. A proper understanding of the effects of prosthetic components on amputee walking mechanics is critical to decreasing complications and risks that are prevalent among lower-limb amputees. The presented research is an important step towards reaching this goal. Advisors/Committee Members: Neptune, Richard R. (advisor), Barr, Ronald E. (committee member), Crawford, Richard H. (committee member), Fernandez, Benito R. (committee member), Abraham, Lawrence D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomechanics; Below-knee amputee; Prosthetic feet; Prosthetic ankle; Joint kinetics; Ground reaction forces; Muscle activity; Gait mechanics; Forward dynamics simulation; Transtibial amputees; Amputee gait mechanics; Prosthetics; Artificial limbs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ventura, J. D. (2010). Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ventura, Jessica Dawn. “Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ventura, Jessica Dawn. “Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics.” 2010. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ventura JD. Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786.

Council of Science Editors:

Ventura JD. Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786

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