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You searched for subject:(Prosthetic ankle). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Brigham Young University

1. Wiersdorf, Jason Matthew. Preliminary Design Approach for Prosthetic Ankle Joints Using Compliant Mechanisms.

Degree: MS, 2005, Brigham Young University

The objective of this thesis is to develop design approaches and models for prosthetic ankle joints using kinematic models of the human ankle and compliant mechanisms technology. Compliant mechanisms offer several potential design advantages over traditional rigid-body designs including high reliability and low cost. These design advantages are ideal for use in prosthetics. Some prosthetic ankle/foot systems currently on the market have multiple degrees of freedom yet are expensive. Additionally, even though these systems have multiple degrees of freedom, none of them are designed after the actual movements of the biological ankle. In this thesis a two, single degree-of-freedom hinge joint model, which is a kinematic model based on the biological ankle during walking, is used to develop compliant prosthetic ankle joints. The use of the model together with compliant mechanisms may provide the ability to develop highly functional prosthetic ankle joints at a lower cost than current high-performance prosthetic systems. Finally, a design approach for ankles may facilitate future development for knees, hips or other biological joints.

Subjects/Keywords: compliant; compliant mechanism; prosthetic; ankle; biomechanical; kinematic ankle model; Mechanical Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wiersdorf, J. M. (2005). Preliminary Design Approach for Prosthetic Ankle Joints Using Compliant Mechanisms. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1720&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wiersdorf, Jason Matthew. “Preliminary Design Approach for Prosthetic Ankle Joints Using Compliant Mechanisms.” 2005. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed April 13, 2021. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1720&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wiersdorf, Jason Matthew. “Preliminary Design Approach for Prosthetic Ankle Joints Using Compliant Mechanisms.” 2005. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wiersdorf JM. Preliminary Design Approach for Prosthetic Ankle Joints Using Compliant Mechanisms. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2005. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1720&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

Wiersdorf JM. Preliminary Design Approach for Prosthetic Ankle Joints Using Compliant Mechanisms. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2005. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1720&context=etd

2. Schlafly, Millicent. Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait.

Degree: 2018, University of South Florida

Currently there are nearly 2 million people living with limb loss in the United States [1]. Many of these individuals are either transtibial (below knee) or transfemoral (above knee) amputees and require an ankle-foot prosthesis for basic mobility. While there are an abundance of options available for individuals who require an ankle-foot prosthesis, these options fail to mimic an intact ankle when it comes to key evaluation criteria such as range of motion, push-off force, and roll over shape. The roll over shape is created by plotting the center of pressure during a step in a shank-based coordinate system. To address the need for a prosthesis that effectively replaces the ankle's contribution to an able-bodied gait, a biomimetic approach is taken in the design the Compliant & Articulating Prosthetic Ankle (CAPA) foot. The passive CAPA foot consists of four components connected by torsion springs representing the Phalanges, Metatarsal bones, Talus, and Calcaneus. Biomimetic functionality is exhibited by CAPA foot with regards to the roll over shape and a linear relationship between moment exerted and ankle angle, distinguishing the CAPA foot from other ankle-foot prostheses. A mathematical model of the CAPA foot is created to determine the roll over shape a specific CAPA foot geometry would produce and support eventual customization of the 3D printed components. The mathematical model is used to optimize the design to two distinctly different roll over shapes, one with a rocker radius closer to that of the Talus bone and the other closer to the energetically advantageous value of 0.3 times leg length [2, 3]. Compliant and stiff versions of the two CAPA feet were compared to a conventional Solid Articulating Cushioned Heel (SACH) foot and a passive dynamic response foot (Renegade┬« AT produced by Freedom Innovations). Ten able bodied subjects walked on the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment normally, and then with a transfemoral prosthetic simulator. The study was separated into two experiments. For the second experiment (subjects 6-10), the versions of the CAPA foot had pretension in the dorsiflexion springs. Overall the ankle angles and sagittal plane ground reaction forces of the CAPA foot better mimicked an intact ankle-foot than the existing passive ankle-foot prostheses. Added pretension increased the sagittal plane ground reaction forces and roll over shape radius of curvature and arc length. Nine out of ten participants preferred the CAPA foot and there was a statistical significant difference (F=14.2, p<0.01) between the difficulty level rating given for trials with the CAPA foot versus the existing ankle-foot prostheses. The mathematical model is found to be capable of accurately predicting experimental roll over shape trends and the concept of roll over shape based design is demonstrated. Successful aspects of the CAPA foot can be applied to other ankle-foot prosthesis. The CAPA foot could provide a passive, cheap, and personalizable ankle-foot prosthesis that improves mobility the quality of…

Subjects/Keywords: Ankle-Foot Prosthesis; Biomimetic Prosthetic Device; Roll Over Shape; Biomechanics; Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering; Mechanical Engineering

…taken in the design the Compliant & Articulating Prosthetic Ankle (CAPA) foot. The… …Compliant & Articulating Prosthetic Ankle (CAPA) foot, the author relies on an improved… …x5B;15, 16]. Fundamentally, active prosthetic ankle-feet operate using preplanned… …functionality, so far it has been impossible for a passive prosthetic ankle-foot to mimic both. There… …design a quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot that increases the stiffness with ankle angle… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schlafly, M. (2018). Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7710

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schlafly, Millicent. “Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait.” 2018. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed April 13, 2021. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7710.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schlafly, Millicent. “Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait.” 2018. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Schlafly M. Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7710.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schlafly M. Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2018. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/7710

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

3. Ventura, Jessica Dawn. Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2010, University of Texas – Austin

Over one million amputees are living in the United States with major lower limb loss (Ziegler-Graham et al. 2008). Lower limb amputation leads to the functional loss of the ankle plantar flexor muscles, which are important contributors to body support, forward propulsion, and leg swing initiation during walking (Neptune et al. 2001; Liu et al. 2006). Effective prosthetic component design is essential for successful rehabilitation of amputees to return to an active lifestyle by partially replacing the functional role of the ankle muscles. The series of experimental and computer simulation studies presented in this research showed that design characteristics of energy storage and return prosthetic ankles, specifically the elastic stiffness, significantly influence residual and intact leg ground reaction forces, knee joint moments, and muscle activity, thus affecting muscle output. These findings highlight the importance of proper prosthetic foot stiffness prescription for amputees to assure effective rehabilitation outcomes. The research also showed that the ankle muscles serve to stabilize the body during turning the center of mass. When amputees turn while supported by their prosthetic components, they rely more on gravity to redirect the center of mass than active muscle generation. This mechanism increases the risks of falling and identifies a need for prosthetic components and rehabilitation focused on increasing amputee stability during turning. A proper understanding of the effects of prosthetic components on amputee walking mechanics is critical to decreasing complications and risks that are prevalent among lower-limb amputees. The presented research is an important step towards reaching this goal. Advisors/Committee Members: Neptune, Richard R. (advisor), Barr, Ronald E. (committee member), Crawford, Richard H. (committee member), Fernandez, Benito R. (committee member), Abraham, Lawrence D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomechanics; Below-knee amputee; Prosthetic feet; Prosthetic ankle; Joint kinetics; Ground reaction forces; Muscle activity; Gait mechanics; Forward dynamics simulation; Transtibial amputees; Amputee gait mechanics; Prosthetics; Artificial limbs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ventura, J. D. (2010). Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ventura, Jessica Dawn. “Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ventura, Jessica Dawn. “Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics.” 2010. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Ventura JD. Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786.

Council of Science Editors:

Ventura JD. Experimental analysis and computational simulation of unilateral transtibial amputee walking to evaluate prosthetic device design characteristics and amputee gait mechanics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-786

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