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You searched for subject:(Programming annotation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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NSYSU

1. Su, Wei-cheng. âCoding Peekaboomâ Game-Based Programming Semantic Tagging System.

Degree: Master, Information Management, 2017, NSYSU

This study introduces a game-based semantic tagging system, âCoding Peekaboomâ, to collect the concepts of a piece of code. People who are interested in learning programming skills often face many problems while practicing by their own. To help programming learners identify the problems they encountered, this study developed a crowdsourcing game, âCoding Peekaboomâ, for collecting programming concepts of pieces of code and programming questions to examine whether a game-based crowdsourcing mechanism can really be adopted in such specific domain, and whether the game-based mechanism can make participants be willing to join and continue the identify concepts tasks. An experiment has been conducted to collect the programming concepts from âCoding Peekaboomâ with EEG device. âCoding Peekaboomâ shows a great result in concepts quality with 94% in average of correct concept coverage. The brainwave analysis and questionnaire results show that participants are likely to enter a state of flow with the kind of game-based mechanism. With the high quality programming concepts collected from âCoding Peekaboomâ, the study can further investigate concept recognition of each piece of code to help programming learners, especially novices, find the solutions to their questions efficiently and effectively. Advisors/Committee Members: Yi-Ling Lin (committee member), Nian-Shing Chen (chair), I-Han Hsiao (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Game; Flow experience; EEG; Labeling; Segmentation; Programming annotation; Crowdsourcing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Su, W. (2017). âCoding Peekaboomâ Game-Based Programming Semantic Tagging System. (Thesis). NSYSU. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0624117-104105

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Su, Wei-cheng. “âCoding Peekaboomâ Game-Based Programming Semantic Tagging System.” 2017. Thesis, NSYSU. Accessed January 29, 2020. http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0624117-104105.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Su, Wei-cheng. “âCoding Peekaboomâ Game-Based Programming Semantic Tagging System.” 2017. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Su W. âCoding Peekaboomâ Game-Based Programming Semantic Tagging System. [Internet] [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0624117-104105.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Su W. âCoding Peekaboomâ Game-Based Programming Semantic Tagging System. [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2017. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0624117-104105

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Bai, Xi. Peer-to-peer, multi-agent interaction adapted to a web architecture.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Edinburgh

The Internet and Web have brought in a new era of information sharing and opened up countless opportunities for people to rethink and redefine communication. With the development of network-related technologies, a Client/Server architecture has become dominant in the application layer of the Internet. Nowadays network nodes are behind firewalls and Network Address Translations, and the centralised design of the Client/Server architecture limits communication between users on the client side. Achieving the conflicting goals of data privacy and data openness is difficult and in many cases the difficulty is compounded by the differing solutions adopted by different organisations and companies. Building a more decentralised or distributed environment for people to freely share their knowledge has become a pressing challenge and we need to understand how to adapt the pervasive Client/Server architecture to this more fluid environment. This thesis describes a novel framework by which network nodes or humans can interact and share knowledge with each other through formal service-choreography specifications in a decentralised manner. The platform allows peers to publish, discover and (un)subscribe to those specifications in the form of Interaction Models (IMs). Peer groups can be dynamically formed and disbanded based on the interaction logs of peers. IMs are published in HTML documents as normal Web pages indexable by search engines and associated with lightweight annotations which semantically enhance the embedded IM elements and at the same time make IM publications comply with the Linked Data principles. The execution of IMs is decentralised on each peer via conventional Web browsers, potentially giving the system access to a very large user community. In this thesis, after developing a proof-of-concept implementation, we carry out case studies of the resulting functionality and evaluate the implementation across several metrics. An increasing number of service providers have began to look for customers proactively, and we believe that in the near future we will not search for services but rather services will find us through our peer communities. Our approaches show how a peer-to-peer architecture for this purpose can be obtained on top of a conventional Client/Server Web infrastructure.

Subjects/Keywords: 006.3; process calculus; calculus-based coordination; semantic annotation; linked data; agent-oriented programming

…Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 5.2.3 Annotation Serialisation… …100 5.3 IM Annotation Injection and Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 5.3.1… …5.3.2 5.4 Annotation Injection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Annotation… …Embedded-Annotation Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Social Group Formation and… …formation can benefit from harnessing process-oriented programming with lightweight semantic… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bai, X. (2013). Peer-to-peer, multi-agent interaction adapted to a web architecture. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/7968

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bai, Xi. “Peer-to-peer, multi-agent interaction adapted to a web architecture.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. Accessed January 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/7968.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bai, Xi. “Peer-to-peer, multi-agent interaction adapted to a web architecture.” 2013. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Bai X. Peer-to-peer, multi-agent interaction adapted to a web architecture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/7968.

Council of Science Editors:

Bai X. Peer-to-peer, multi-agent interaction adapted to a web architecture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/7968

3. Ghadie, Mohamed A. Analysis and Reconstruction of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Tree: A Linear Programming Approach for Gene Selection .

Degree: 2015, University of Ottawa

Stem cells differentiate through an organized hierarchy of intermediate cell types to terminally differentiated cell types. This process is largely guided by master transcriptional regulators, but it also depends on the expression of many other types of genes. The discrete cell types in the differentiation hierarchy are often identified based on the expression or non-expression of certain marker genes. Historically, these have often been various cell-surface proteins, which are fairly easy to assay biochemically but are not necessarily causative of the cell type, in the sense of being master transcriptional regulators. This raises important questions about how gene expression across the whole genome controls or reflects cell state, and in particular, differentiation hierarchies. Traditional approaches to understanding gene expression patterns across multiple conditions, such as principal components analysis or K-means clustering, can group cell types based on gene expression, but they do so without knowledge of the differentiation hierarchy. Hierarchical clustering and maximization of parsimony can organize the cell types into a tree, but in general this tree is different from the differentiation hierarchy. Using hematopoietic differentiation as an example, we demonstrate how many genes other than marker genes are able to discriminate between different branches of the differentiation tree by proposing two models for detecting genes that are up-regulated or down-regulated in distinct lineages. We then propose a novel approach to solving the following problem: Given the differentiation hierarchy and gene expression data at each node, construct a weighted Euclidean distance metric such that the minimum spanning tree with respect to that metric is precisely the given differentiation hierarchy. We provide a set of linear constraints that are provably sufficient for the desired construction and a linear programming framework to identify sparse sets of weights, effectively identifying genes that are most relevant for discriminating different parts of the tree. We apply our method to microarray gene expression data describing 38 cell types in the hematopoiesis hierarchy, constructing a sparse weighted Euclidean metric that uses just 175 genes. These 175 genes are different than the marker genes that were used to identify the 38 cell types, hence offering a novel alternative way of discriminating different branches of the tree. A DAVID functional annotation analysis shows that the 175 genes reflect major processes and pathways active in different parts of the tree. However, we find that there are many alternative sets of weights that satisfy the linear constraints. Thus, in the style of random-forest training, we also construct metrics based on random subsets of the genes and compare them to the metric of 175 genes. Our results show that the 175 genes frequently appear in the random metrics, implicating their significance from an empirical point of view as well. Finally, we show how our linear programming method is able to…

Subjects/Keywords: Linear Programming; Distance Metric Learning; Machine Learning; Feature Selection; Tree Reconstruction; Hierarchical Clustering; Minimum Spanning Tree; Clustering; Optimization; Maximum Parsimony; Euclidean Distance; Weighted Euclidean; Stem Cell Differentiation; Hematopoiesis; Transcriptional Regulation; Transcription Factor; Gene Selection; Gene Expression; Microarray; Cell Type; Marker Gene; Functional Annotation; Random Forest; Biological Function; Regulation; Statistical Significance; Erythropoiesis; Natural Killer Cell; T Cell; B Cell; Granulocyte; Monocyte; Megakaryocyte; Minimization; Linear Constraint; Cell Lineage

…between nodes. We then propose a linear programming framework to identify sparse sets of weights… …linear programming approach and we succeed in constructing a weighted Euclidean metric that… …within a linear programming framework. Therefore, in section 2.6, we describe and illustrate… …introduction to linear programming in section 2.7. 2.1 Related Work Regulation of stem cell… …Minimum spanning tree with nodes 2.7 from and edges Linear Programming Our approach to… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ghadie, M. A. (2015). Analysis and Reconstruction of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Tree: A Linear Programming Approach for Gene Selection . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/32048

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ghadie, Mohamed A. “Analysis and Reconstruction of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Tree: A Linear Programming Approach for Gene Selection .” 2015. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed January 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/32048.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ghadie, Mohamed A. “Analysis and Reconstruction of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Tree: A Linear Programming Approach for Gene Selection .” 2015. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Ghadie MA. Analysis and Reconstruction of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Tree: A Linear Programming Approach for Gene Selection . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/32048.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ghadie MA. Analysis and Reconstruction of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Tree: A Linear Programming Approach for Gene Selection . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/32048

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.