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You searched for subject:(Power quality barriers). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Brunel University

1. Sultan, Saad Saleh. Power quality programme awareness : framework for developing countries.

Degree: PhD, 2013, Brunel University

In recent years, Power Quality Programmes (PQPs) have become one of the most recent services offered to electrical distribution companies, both private and state suppliers. This is due to the sudden increase in the number of concerns over power quality (PQ) problems. The aim of this research is to study the implementation of a PQP framework, and the obstacles and barriers faced by Libyan Distribution Networks (LDNs) in implementing a PQP. Firstly, to identify the most critical success factors that would have a major impact on PQP implementation in LDNs. Five Critical Success Factors (CSFs) for PQP were identified to examine the level of power quality in LDNs. They are PQ awareness, PQ disturbances, PQ management commitment, PQ employee’s participation and training and PQ customers’ satisfaction. It revealed that all five CSFs were significantly affected by the level of PQ awareness, and the suspension of PQP implementation. An appropriate PQP framework was developed for the purpose of this study to guide LDNs as a case study in developing countries. The proposed PQP framework model was validated based on the identified CSFs, and the barriers and benefits of PQP, which were analysed using different techniques based on both SPSS and NVivo software. The PQP framework was developed from the findings based on the responses of 397 PQ survey participants, and supported by 44 face-to-face semi-structured interviews conducted with professionals and expert LDNs staff. Out of the 16 PQP barriers, 13 were statistically significant, which indicated that Libya distribution systems have already surmounted various barriers to implementing a PQP effectively. The developed PQP framework consisted of three essential phases. Phase one is designed to increase the level of awareness, while phase two involves preparation for PQP, which contains seven crucial requirements. Phase three, which is the implementation, is designed to determine both the weaknesses and obstacles, and is designed to increase the awareness level. This framework encourages and guides the implementation teams to have an obvious and clear awareness and vision of how to prevent existing obstacles from reappearing in different forms, leading to long-term PQP improvements. There were 11 overall benefits of PQP implementation, which would have a positive impact on LDNs.

Subjects/Keywords: 621.31; Power quality awareness; Power quality barriers; Power quality benefits; Power quality programme critical success factors; Lybian distribution network

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sultan, S. S. (2013). Power quality programme awareness : framework for developing countries. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brunel University. Retrieved from http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7452 ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.571803

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sultan, Saad Saleh. “Power quality programme awareness : framework for developing countries.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Brunel University. Accessed April 20, 2021. http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7452 ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.571803.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sultan, Saad Saleh. “Power quality programme awareness : framework for developing countries.” 2013. Web. 20 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sultan SS. Power quality programme awareness : framework for developing countries. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brunel University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 20]. Available from: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7452 ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.571803.

Council of Science Editors:

Sultan SS. Power quality programme awareness : framework for developing countries. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brunel University; 2013. Available from: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7452 ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.571803


University of Toronto

2. Polych, Carol. Exploring the Help-seeking / Helping Dynamic in Illegal Drug Use.

Degree: 2010, University of Toronto

Heuristic qualitative research techniques (Moustakas,1990) were used to explore the dynamic of the help-seeking / helping relationship in illegal drug use from the perspective of the professional. Six professionals, expert in helping people living with an addiction, shared their opinions and insights, analyzed problems, explained the rewards, and made recommendations for improvement, based on their own practices within the health care and social services systems. These professionals identify stigma as a major barrier to the provision of quality care in addictions, and analysis shows that a cultural predilection for scapegoating underlies the application of stigma. The many layered social purposes served by the designation of certain substances as illegal and the utility of scapegoating to hegemonic, vested interests is surveyed. This thesis reviews the true social costs of addictions, the entrenched and enmeshed nature of the alternate economy, and the many above ground institutions and professions sustained by the use of drugs designated as illegal. Prohibition and imprisonment as a response to illegal drug use is exposed as costly, inhumane, dangerous, and overwhelmingly counterproductive in terms of limiting harm from illegal drug use. A recent example of drug prohibition propaganda is deconstructed. Consideration is given to the role of the Drug War as a vehicle to accelerate social creep toward a fragmented self-disciplining surveillance society of consumer-producers in the service of economic elites. Classism is brought forward from a fractured social ground characterized by many splits: sexism, racism, age-ism, able-ism, size-ism, locationism, linguism, and others, to better track the nature of the social control that illegal drugs offer to economic elites. The moral loading that surrounds illegal drug use is deconstructed and the influence of religion is presented for discussion. The primitive roots of human understanding that endorse the ritual Drug War and its supporting mythology, leading to the demonization of illegal drugs and the people who use them, are uncovered. Direction is taken from Benner and Wrubel’s Primacy of Caring (1989) and other leaders in the professions as a means to move practitioners away from their roles as agents of social control into a paradigm of social change.

PhD

Advisors/Committee Members: Knowles, J. Gary, Adult Education and Counselling Psychology.

Subjects/Keywords: addiction; illegal drugs; helping-seeking / helping; helping relationship; stigma; anomie; illegalization; heuristic research; professionalization; consumerism; arts-informed research; Benner & Wrubel; Goffman; Link & Phelan; Moustakas; quality of care; scapegoating; prohibition; prison; harm-reduction; drug propaganda; drug war; surveillance society; classism; elitism; discrimination; barriers to care; mythology; social control; drug demonization; teaching; health care; mental health; infectious disease; industrial disease; Wittgenstein; hegemony; policing; legalization; education; training; power; social violence; institutionalized violence; care; attitude; marginalization; alienation; Marx; Chomsky; infectious disease; communicable disease; 0516; 0347; 0627; 0573; 0700

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Polych, C. (2010). Exploring the Help-seeking / Helping Dynamic in Illegal Drug Use. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26431

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Polych, Carol. “Exploring the Help-seeking / Helping Dynamic in Illegal Drug Use.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed April 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26431.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Polych, Carol. “Exploring the Help-seeking / Helping Dynamic in Illegal Drug Use.” 2010. Web. 20 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Polych C. Exploring the Help-seeking / Helping Dynamic in Illegal Drug Use. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26431.

Council of Science Editors:

Polych C. Exploring the Help-seeking / Helping Dynamic in Illegal Drug Use. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/26431

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