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You searched for subject:(Poverty in Canada). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Chokie, Mengisteab. Three Essays on Welfare and Development Economics: A Place Based Approach.

Degree: 2012, University of Saskatchewan

The thesis contains three essays on development and welfare economics. The first essay investigates the relationship between economic growth, income inequality and absolute poverty (those living on less than $1 per day) using data from 56 developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In doing so, I first address the two-way causality relationship between growth and inequality. Consistent with previous studies on income inequality and growth in developing countries, I find that higher initial income inequality retards growth. In addition, I find that quality institutions have higher explanatory power than geography and climate. Using Geographic Weighted Regressions scheme this essay also finds evidence that growth is the central driving factor in reducing poverty and income inequality has a positive association with poverty. Besides, both the partial elasticity of poverty to growth and inequality exhibit significant systematic geographic variation across countries. The second essay examines the regional variation in local poverty for nearly 2,400 rural and urban Canadian communities using 1981-2001 Census data. In doing so, three different measures of poverty are used to examine the response of local poverty to changes in local economic and demographic attributes. These measures of poverty include: average economic family’s poverty gap, local poverty rate (LICO rates) and per capita poverty gap levels. By employing fixed effect panel data estimation technique, I find that local economic/ labor market conditions have greater impacts in explaining the regional variation in poverty gap and incidence levels across communities. However, the response of the family poverty gap to changes in labor market conditions is higher compared to poverty incidence or per capita gap levels. On the other hand, individual poverty gaps are shaped mostly by community demographic structure. Therefore, I find that using different types of poverty measurements results in drawing slightly different conclusions on the relationship between local attributes and the poverty-level outcome. Finally, the third essay analyzes the nature, magnitude and direction of labor market responses and wages across Canadian communities in relation to job creation and accessibility. In particular, this study explores whether better employment access (geographic proximity) will improve labor market outcomes for low-wage earning rural and urban Canadians by giving special attention to communities with greater concentration of recent immigrants and Aboriginal Canadians. First, it finds that better job-access is inversely related to the proportion of workers who are low wage earners (those with hourly wage less than $10 per hour). This relationship is stronger in rural communities; however, in urban areas prevalence of low-wage earners has no association with job access. Human capital plays a prominent role in urban areas. Nonetheless, it finds evidence that urban communities with higher shares of recent immigrants have positive association with low wage… Advisors/Committee Members: Partridge, Mark D., Olfert, Rose M., Bollman, Ray D., Echevarria, Cristina, Huq, Mobinul.

Subjects/Keywords: LICO; Poverty in Canada; Low Wage

…36 Figure 2. The Geographic variation in the Lagged Poverty Rate… …39 Figure 8. The Spatial Dimension of Family Poverty Gap (LICO GAP) in Western… …65 Figure 9. The Spatial Dimension of LICOs in Western and Eastern Canada… …quantified targets for addressing extreme poverty in its many dimensions- income poverty, hunger… …falls. It is possible for inequality to be sufficiently high to result in rising poverty… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chokie, M. (2012). Three Essays on Welfare and Development Economics: A Place Based Approach. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-09-852

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chokie, Mengisteab. “Three Essays on Welfare and Development Economics: A Place Based Approach.” 2012. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-09-852.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chokie, Mengisteab. “Three Essays on Welfare and Development Economics: A Place Based Approach.” 2012. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Chokie M. Three Essays on Welfare and Development Economics: A Place Based Approach. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-09-852.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chokie M. Three Essays on Welfare and Development Economics: A Place Based Approach. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-09-852

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Queens University

2. Langford, William. 'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979 .

Degree: History, Queens University

For a remarkable period between the late 1950s and mid-1970s, a global politics of poverty emerged.  Prompted by anti-imperialist struggles, working class demands, social and cultural ferment, and socialist alternatives, the politics turned on how to alleviate global poverty – and to what ends. It had different manifestations, but contained shared core insights and practices.  It did not simply animate the international sphere, but permeated national, regional, and local politics as well.  In this context, some Canadian liberals believed that development would contribute to the elimination of poverty, internationally and domestically, by involving people more fully in the values, economic processes, and political practices of liberal capitalist democracy.  Community development, regional development, and international development emerged as concurrent, if contested, schemes to revitalize liberal democracy within and beyond Canada’s borders. This study is a political history of the relationship between poverty, democracy, and development in Canada in the 1960s and 1970s within a larger global frame.  Through a focus on development programs across three scales, I trace the on-the-ground activism of reformers and radicals in dialogue with the global context in which they consciously rooted their work.  The focus of the local scale is the community development and animation sociale activities of Company of Young Canadians (CYC) in Lesser Slave Lake, Alberta and St-Henri, Montreal.  On a regional scale, I examine the efforts of Cape Breton Development Corporation (DEVCO) to address regional inequality and poverty.  Adopting an international scale allows us to focus on the Third World international development activity of Canadian University Service Overseas (CUSO) – namely, its project in Tanzania.  I argue that liberal reformers, amid exchanges with a New Left, created and committed to development programs they believed would empower people, both in Canada and abroad, to confront their own poverty and foster a meaningful democracy rooted in everyday life. However, development programs – having stopped short of amending capitalist social relations and the political and economic hierarchies they engendered – realized neither their anti-poverty nor democratic goals.

Subjects/Keywords: development; democracy; poverty; Canada in the World; global Sixties

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Langford, W. (n.d.). 'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979 . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22015

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Langford, William. “'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979 .” Thesis, Queens University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22015.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Langford, William. “'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979 .” Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Langford W. 'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979 . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22015.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Langford W. 'Helping People Help Themselves': Democracy, Development, and the Global Politics of Poverty in Canada, 1964-1979 . [Thesis]. Queens University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22015

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

3. Kinuthia, Wanyee. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .

Degree: 2013, University of Ottawa

This thesis draws on David Harvey’s concept of “accumulation by dispossession” and an international political economy (IPE) approach centred on the institutional arrangements and power structures that privilege certain actors and values, in order to critique current capitalist practices of primitive accumulation by the global corporate extractive industry. The thesis examines how accumulation by dispossession by the global extractive industry is facilitated by the “free entry” or “free mining” principle. It does so by focusing on Canada as a leader in the global extractive industry and the spread of this country’s mining laws to other countries – in other words, the transnationalisation of norms in the global extractive industry – so as to maintain a consistent and familiar operating environment for Canadian extractive companies. The transnationalisation of norms is further promoted by key international institutions such as the World Bank, which is also the world’s largest development lender and also plays a key role in shaping the regulations that govern natural resource extraction. The thesis briefly investigates some Canadian examples of resource extraction projects, in order to demonstrate the weaknesses of Canadian mining laws, particularly the lack of protection of landowners’ rights under the free entry system and the subsequent need for “free, prior and informed consent” (FPIC). The thesis also considers some of the challenges to the adoption and implementation of the right to FPIC. These challenges include embedded institutional structures like the free entry mining system, international political economy (IPE) as shaped by international institutions and powerful corporations, as well as concerns regarding ‘local’ power structures or the legitimacy of representatives of communities affected by extractive projects. The thesis concludes that in order for Canada to be truly recognized as a leader in the global extractive industry, it must establish legal norms domestically to ensure that Canadian mining companies and residents can be held accountable when there is evidence of environmental and/or human rights violations associated with the activities of Canadian mining companies abroad. The thesis also concludes that Canada needs to address underlying structural issues such as the free entry mining system and implement FPIC, in order to curb “accumulation by dispossession” by the extractive industry, both domestically and abroad.

Subjects/Keywords: natural resources; raw materials; global extractive industry; mining; accumulation by dispossession; primitive accumulation; resource curse; free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC); consultation; free entry; Bill C-300; Omnibus Bill; self-determination; madaraka; multinational / transnational corporations; land grabs; governance gap; enforcement vacuum; regulatory gap; landlessness; involuntary resettlement; displacement; liberalization; financial markets; capitalism; International Monetary Fund (IMF); Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability (CNCA); Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA); Impact and Benefits Agreement (IBA); corporate social responsibility (CSR); international political economy (IPE); Washington Consensus; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP); sustainable development; rare earth; oil; fossil fuels; Whitehorse Mining Initiative (WMI); foreign direct investment (FDI); privatization; Canadian Centre for the Study of Resource Conflict (CCSRC); Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade (SCFAIT); Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD); neoliberal / corporate globalization; Northern Gateway pipeline project; Ring of Fire; centre-periphery; metropolitan-hinterland; Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); Gross Domestic Product (GDP); Extractive Industries Review (EIR); Sub-Saharan Africa; war on terror; terrorists; false flag terrorism; Fisheries Act; Navigable Waters Protection Act; primary goods; aid; Third World debt; free trade; modernization; dependency; tariffs; trade barriers; HudBay; home country liability; state; Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX); Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC); spatio-temporal fix; militarism; Sudbury; Atlantic Canada; Crown; neo-colonialism; industrial revolution; imperialism; public policy; democracy; justice; Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA); Export Development Corporation (EDC); Kimberley Process; International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM); Mining Association of Canada; National Roundtables on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the Canadian Extractive Industry in Developing Countries; equity; austerity measures; Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO); Mining Act reforms; proletariat; aboriginal; Least Developed Countries (LDCs); developing country; comparative advantage; human rights; export-led development; Tiomin; Government of Kenya; Government of Canada; Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC); World Bank Group (WBG); World Trade Organization (WTO); United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP); Bill C-38; Bill C-45; Assembly of First Nations (AFN); Idle No More; meaningful participation; AFRICOM; titanium; Base Resources Australia; House of Commons; conditionalities; Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs); World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

in Africa: Where does Canada Stand? Review of African Political Economy (35)117… …x29;. Guatemalan mine claims against HudBay can be tried in Canada, judge says. The Globe… …energy-and-resources/guatemalan-mine-claims-can-be-tried-in-canada-judge -says/article13360800… …be allowed in Canada for overseas incidents. Canadian Manufacturing , 22 October 2013… …poverty in 21 Campbell, B. (2010). Revisiting the Reform Process of African Mining… 

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Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kinuthia, W. (2013). “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinuthia, Wanyee. ““Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .” 2013. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinuthia, Wanyee. ““Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada .” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kinuthia W. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kinuthia W. “Accumulation by Dispossession” by the Global Extractive Industry: The Case of Canada . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/30170

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.