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You searched for subject:(Postmodern Detective). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Connelly, Kelly C. From Poe to Auster: Literary Experimentation in the Detective Story Genre.

Degree: PhD, 2009, Temple University

English

Two dominating lines of criticism regarding the detective novel have perpetuated the misconception that detective fiction before the 1960s was a static and monolithic form unworthy of critical study. First, critics of the traditional detective story have argued that the formulaic nature of the genre is antithetical to innovation and leaves no room for creative exploration. Second, critics of the postmodern detective novel have argued that the first literary experiments with the genre began only with post-World War II authors such as Umberto Eco, Italo Calvino, and Paul Auster. What both sets of critics fail to acknowledge is that the detective fiction genre always has been the locus of a dialectic between formulaic plotting and literary experimentation. In this dissertation, I will examine how each generation of detective story authors has engaged in literary innovation to refresh and renew what has been mistakenly labeled as a sterile and static popular genre.

Temple University – Theses

Advisors/Committee Members: Mellen, Joan, Orvell, Miles, O'Hara, Daniel T..

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, General; Anti-Detective; Metaphysical; Detective; Detective Fiction; Postmodern Detective

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Connelly, K. C. (2009). From Poe to Auster: Literary Experimentation in the Detective Story Genre. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,41668

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Connelly, Kelly C. “From Poe to Auster: Literary Experimentation in the Detective Story Genre.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed May 10, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,41668.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Connelly, Kelly C. “From Poe to Auster: Literary Experimentation in the Detective Story Genre.” 2009. Web. 10 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Connelly KC. From Poe to Auster: Literary Experimentation in the Detective Story Genre. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. [cited 2021 May 10]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,41668.

Council of Science Editors:

Connelly KC. From Poe to Auster: Literary Experimentation in the Detective Story Genre. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2009. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,41668


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

2. Stephan, Matthias J. The postmodern structure of consciousness.

Degree: PhD, Comparative Literature, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This dissertation seeks to present a reductive definition of the concept of literary modernism. As such, I identify the metaphor of the postmodern structure of consciousness, as the best tool by which to both identify and understand postmodernism in its literary expression. This is done through an analysis of epistemological and ontological questions, considered specifically in the genre fiction categories of detective fiction and science fiction respectively. Those genres were specifically chosen as they best exemplify texts which have epistemological and ontological dominants, and through an analysis of the genres themselves, and their inherent structures, I argue that one can see how the postmodern structure of consciousness comes to serve as the best means by which to understand our contemporary society. Through the structural nature of this understanding that I see this as reflective of a postmodern understanding of society, I argue that postmodernism allows for the change sought after within society as currently constructed, and this project identifies the structural means by which such change can come about. Advisors/Committee Members: Rushing, Robert (advisor), Rushing, Robert (Committee Chair), Blake, Nancy (committee member), Stenport, Anna (committee member), Hansen, James (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Postmodernism; Structure; Detective Fiction; Science Fiction; Postmodern Novel; Postmodern Theory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stephan, M. J. (2016). The postmodern structure of consciousness. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90872

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stephan, Matthias J. “The postmodern structure of consciousness.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed May 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90872.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stephan, Matthias J. “The postmodern structure of consciousness.” 2016. Web. 10 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Stephan MJ. The postmodern structure of consciousness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2021 May 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90872.

Council of Science Editors:

Stephan MJ. The postmodern structure of consciousness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90872


Texas A&M University

3. Foreman, Adrienne C. The Mystery of the Situated Body: Finding Stability through Narratives of Disability in the Detective Genre.

Degree: PhD, English, 2013, Texas A&M University

The appearance, use, and philosophy of the disabled detective are latent even in early detective texts, such as in Arthur Conan Doyle’s canonical Sherlock Holmes series. By philosophy, I am referring to both why the detective feels compelled to detect as well as the system of detection the detective uses and on which the text relies. Because the detective feels incompatible with the world around him (all of the detectives I analyze in this dissertation are men), he is driven to either fix himself, the world, or both. His systematic approach includes diagnosing problems through symptomatology and removing the deficient aspect. While the detective narrative’s original framework assimilates bodies to medical and scientific discourses and norms in order to represent a stable social order, I argue that contemporary detective subgenres, including classical disability detective texts, hardboiled disability detective texts and postmodern disability detective texts, respond to this framework by making the portrayal of disability explicit by allocating it to the detective. The texts present disability as both a literary mechanism that uses disability to represent abstract metaphors (of hardship, of pity, of heroism) and a cultural construct in and of itself. I contend that the texts use disability to investigate what it means to be an individual and a member of society. Thus, I trace disability in detective fiction as it parallels the cultural move away from the autonomous individual and his participation in a stable social order and move towards the socially located agent and shifting situational values. Advisors/Committee Members: Morey, Anne (advisor), Robinson, Sally (committee member), O'Farrell, Mary Ann (committee member), Humphrey, Dan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: detective; disability; social order; identity; identification; lack; erotics; hardboiled; postmodern; dismodernism; desire; gender; sidekick; epistemology; phenomenology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Foreman, A. C. (2013). The Mystery of the Situated Body: Finding Stability through Narratives of Disability in the Detective Genre. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151233

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Foreman, Adrienne C. “The Mystery of the Situated Body: Finding Stability through Narratives of Disability in the Detective Genre.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed May 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151233.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Foreman, Adrienne C. “The Mystery of the Situated Body: Finding Stability through Narratives of Disability in the Detective Genre.” 2013. Web. 10 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Foreman AC. The Mystery of the Situated Body: Finding Stability through Narratives of Disability in the Detective Genre. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2013. [cited 2021 May 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151233.

Council of Science Editors:

Foreman AC. The Mystery of the Situated Body: Finding Stability through Narratives of Disability in the Detective Genre. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151233

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