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You searched for subject:(Post immigration life). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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York University

1. Arda Guney, Talat Balca. The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2016, York University

This dissertation takes ethnographic approach to researching art with an emphasis on the artistic practices of Middle Eastern diasporic artists in Canada and the USA. This dissertation moves from an account of aesthetic theory to the revival of public interest in art related to the Middle East and the artistic challenges faced by diasporic artists from the Middle East in presenting depictions of their own subjectivity. The Arab Spring, revolutions, bloody protests and riots, as well as the attacks of radical Islamist groups have crowded mainstream news coverage with images of terror and the paradigm of radical destruction. Such reflections of horrific scenery emulate the aesthetics of the sublime in the imagination of contemporary politics. The increasing body of art emphasizing the region of the Middle East has also regenerated this mainstream media focus on the Middle East, Arab lands, and the Muslim landscape" with the same connotation of sublimity. I argue that these artistic reflections presume a particular Middle Eastern diasporic subjectivity that comes into visibility simultaneously as the translator and the witness, as well as the victim or perpetrator of this catastrophic imagery of the Middle East. I explore the artistic practices of the Middle Eastern diaspora in order to understand how they reflect their own self-image in the contemporary art scene to challenge this stereotype of the disaster carrier. I also investigate the novel ways in which the new social movements in the Middle East, such as the Green Movement in Iran or the various Arab Springs, are represented by the art works of critical diasporic artists living in North America and how such representations settle within the landscape of contemporary art. In this study, I consider two major subject matters that are present within diasporic artworks related to Middle East: the artistic representations of home countries and the current socio-political landscape; and the self-design art practices enacted through memories of immigration, performances of body and religiosity in the North American art scene. Rather than an analysis of hegemony, this dissertation analyzes how these art trends claim to be artistically valuable and aim to reach a wide audience, as well as what kinds of artistic desires they evoke. Drawing on critical studies of democratic process and social equity, this book contributes to aesthetic theory on contemporary art and puts forward questions concerning whether or not the oppositional capacity of contemporary art has withered away in neoliberal democracies. Advisors/Committee Members: Canefe, Nergis (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Political Science; Diaspora; Culture; Art; Aesthetics; Contemporary art; Middle Eastern; Middle East; North America; 9/11; Terror; Sublime; Muslim; Rancière; Kant; Lyotard; Agamben; Bare life; Burke; Terrorism; Immigration; Refugee; Diasporic; Consensus; Dissensus; Visual studies; Imagery; Multiculturalism; Self-loss; Hyper-realism; Postmodernism; Tragedy; Selfie; Self-image making; Self design; Artist; Memory; Ethnicity; Religion; Religiosity; Cultural difference; Racism; Body; Security; Communication; Representation; Victim; Hero; Victimization; Affect; Witness; Other; Otherization; Canada; US; USA; America; American; Canadian; Citizen; Citizenship; Migration; Xenophobia; Cosmopolitanism; Liberalism; War on terror; Discourse; Resistance; Opposition; Hegemony; Critical art; Partition of sensible; Visual; Imagination; Post-Enlightenment; Universalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arda Guney, T. B. (2016). The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arda Guney, Talat Balca. “The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arda Guney, Talat Balca. “The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America.” 2016. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Arda Guney TB. The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326.

Council of Science Editors:

Arda Guney TB. The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326


University of Victoria

2. Lieb, Christian. Moving west: German-speaking immigration to British Columbia, 1945-1961.

Degree: Dept. of History, 2008, University of Victoria

Germans are among the largest ethnic groups, both in Canada as a whole and in British Columbia. Nevertheless, neither nationally, nor provincially, has this group received much academic attention, especially for the years between the end of the Second World War and the building of the Berlin Wall when about 200,000 German-speaking persons arrived in Canada. Based on the life stories of fifty German immigrants interviewed in British Columbia, published biographies, and archival records from Germany and Canada, this study reconstructs the conditions in interwar and postwar Europe that led to the mass-emigration of Germans in the late 1940s and the 1950s. It argues that this migration movement was not only influenced by government policies and the support of humanitarian organizations, but also by the existence of earlier settlement facilitating chain migrations to Canada. From the port of entry, the dissertation follows the immigrants’ adaptation and integration into Canadian society. Though the vast majority of them did not speak any English, or know much about their adopted country, except that it must be better than what they left in war-torn Europe, Germans are generally ranked among the best integrated ethnic groups in Canada. Yet, despite this assessment, the picture emerging from the sources strongly questions the existence of a singular German immigrant identity in Canada. The distinct self-perceptions of German nationals and ethnic Germans based on their experiences in Europe during the Second World War created striking differences in their patterns of immigration and adaptation to life in Canada which are still discernible after over half a century of settlement in North America. Advisors/Committee Members: Roy, Patricia E. (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: German; Migration; Canada; Immigration; post-World War II; Integration; Immigrant Identity; Ethnic Germans; German Nationals; Immigration Policy; Oral History; British Columbia; Germany; Life stories; UVic Subject Index::Humanities and Social Sciences::History::History, Modern

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lieb, C. (2008). Moving west: German-speaking immigration to British Columbia, 1945-1961. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/904

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lieb, Christian. “Moving west: German-speaking immigration to British Columbia, 1945-1961.” 2008. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/904.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lieb, Christian. “Moving west: German-speaking immigration to British Columbia, 1945-1961.” 2008. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Lieb C. Moving west: German-speaking immigration to British Columbia, 1945-1961. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2008. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/904.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lieb C. Moving west: German-speaking immigration to British Columbia, 1945-1961. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/904

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Colorado

3. Mazloom, Yasmin. I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space.

Degree: MFA, Art & Art History, 2018, University of Colorado

The life of immigrants is discussed in two chapters: living in the country of origin and living abroad. The space that exists in between these two countries and places, is diminished and not discussed because it is not physical but more of a mental space that is rarely recognized unless it is experienced firsthand. Even though only a minority of people will understand this liminal space, it is important to be aware of its existence. Those who reside in this space need to recognize they are not alone, even if their liminal space is different from others, so that they can easier cope with living in this world. This thesis explores my life as a female Iranian immigrant in this liminal space. I illustrate my post-immigration experience and life in between places by incorporating images into an optical device of my creation, which contains constructed photographs to inform my audience. Through this piece, I construct a place and time I have experienced since my immigration. In order to do so, I examine perspectives and elements that impact this liminality. In this paper I first define liminal space and show how this space is a product of a liminal identity, which for me is symbolic of a magic carpet. I conclude how these ideas connect to my work. Advisors/Committee Members: Melanie Walker, George Rivera, Luis Valdovino, Melinda Barlow, Alvin Gregorio.

Subjects/Keywords: Liminal Space; Magic Carpet; Shahre Farang; Post-immigration life; Peep show; Homi Bhabha; Optical Device; Iranian Immigrant; Edward Said; Marcel Duchamp; Art Practice; Composition; Contemporary Art; Creative Writing; Family, Life Course, and Society; Fiction; Fine Arts; Indigenous Studies; Islamic Studies; Islamic World and Near East History; Language Interpretation and Translation; Migration Studies; Nonfiction; Other Architecture; Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology; Other Languages, Societies, and Cultures; Other Music; Performance Studies; Place and Environment; Poetry; Reading and Language; Sociology of Culture; Theatre and Performance Studies; Translation Studies; Visual Studies; Women's History; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mazloom, Y. (2018). I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space. (Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mazloom, Yasmin. “I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space.” 2018. Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mazloom, Yasmin. “I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space.” 2018. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Mazloom Y. I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mazloom Y. I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space. [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.