Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Popular culture Nigeria). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Rhodes University

1. Durodola, Olufunke Treasure Anike. The rising popularity of Pidgin English radio stations in Nigeria: an audience study of Wazobia FM, Lagos.

Degree: Faculty of Humanities, Journalism and Media Studies, 2014, Rhodes University

This research is located within media studies and draws on the Cultural Studies approach. It is an audience study, which uses the mixed methods of focus group discussions and an online survey to examine the importance of the use of Nigerian Pidgin as a broadcast language in investigating the rising popularity of Pidgin English radio in a multi-ethnic and multi-lingual Nigeria. The study focuses on Wazobia FM, a radio station in Lagos, and the first pidgin station in Nigeria. It seeks to determine whether the station’s audience engaged with the station’s programming based on its prioritisation of NigP and the linguistic identity it offers them. The study foregrounds the marginalised status of NigP within the politics of language in Nigeria. It traces the language’s evolution through popular and oppositional expressions in broadcasting and in music. It also seeks to establish the place of Pidgin English within the role that language plays in the formation of the Nigerian identity. This study thus adopts the ‘emic’ perspective, which underpins qualitative methodology, and views social life in terms of processes as opposed to static terms. The theoretical framework of this research revolves around culture, language and identity. Pertinent concepts in post-colonial studies, together with conceptual frameworks in Cultural Studies, such as popular culture, representation, hegemony and counter-culture have been used to make sense of the popularity of NigP radio stations.

Subjects/Keywords: Wazobia FM (Nigeria); Radio audiences  – Nigeria  – Lagos; Pidgin English  – Nigeria  – Lagos; Radio stations  – Nigeria  – Lagos; Mass media and culture  – Nigeria  – Lagos; Language and languages  – Variation; Popular culture  – Nigeria; Postcolonialism  – Nigeria

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Durodola, O. T. A. (2014). The rising popularity of Pidgin English radio stations in Nigeria: an audience study of Wazobia FM, Lagos. (Thesis). Rhodes University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1020886

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Durodola, Olufunke Treasure Anike. “The rising popularity of Pidgin English radio stations in Nigeria: an audience study of Wazobia FM, Lagos.” 2014. Thesis, Rhodes University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1020886.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Durodola, Olufunke Treasure Anike. “The rising popularity of Pidgin English radio stations in Nigeria: an audience study of Wazobia FM, Lagos.” 2014. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Durodola OTA. The rising popularity of Pidgin English radio stations in Nigeria: an audience study of Wazobia FM, Lagos. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rhodes University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1020886.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Durodola OTA. The rising popularity of Pidgin English radio stations in Nigeria: an audience study of Wazobia FM, Lagos. [Thesis]. Rhodes University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1020886

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Alberta

2. Otiono, Nduka. Street stories: orality, media, popular culture and the postcolonial condition in Nigeria.

Degree: PhD, Department of English and Film Studies, 2011, University of Alberta

This study unravels the curious politicization of everyday life in Nigeria. It tracks and redefines a seemingly simple and commonplace but peripheralized genre of everyday life, “street stories,” that is taken for granted as rumours, gossip, and myths, and examines its interrelation to contemporary postcolonial politics and culture in Nigeria. The term “street stories” is used specifically to refer to mythopoeic oral texts produced and circulated as weapons of political resistance or compromise in multiple cultural formations within the postcolonial state— especially in the metropolis with its complex demographics. This research thus demonstrates how these texts assumed heightened critical value, especially during the brutish years of military dictatorships (1985 and 1997), and the unfolding democratic order since 1999, with emphasis on President Umaru Yar’Adua’s short-lived regime (2007-2010). Lagos, Nigeria’s commercial capital, is my paradigmatic research setting. This work analyzes how the “unofficial” narratives (street stories) open up alternative expressions of civic responsibilities and the pursuit of justice and human rights in the context of government’s abdication of its social contract in the postcolonial state in Africa. The study addresses questions such as: What forms of empowerment and social justice emerge when ordinary citizens gather in pubs, mass transit stations, around urban newsstands, and other arenas of socialization in the “public sphere,” and conduct impromptu “mock trials” of rulers and traducers of human rights in the context of postcolonial tyranny? How do street stories mediate, and are mediated by the critical press, Nollywood films, popular musical works and their producers? The significance of these street stories can be gleaned from the state's vicious censorship of their transmission channels, and its issuance of regular public statements and billboards discouraging rumour mongering, as well as administering oaths of secrecy on public servants. My primary texts comprise “street stories” already published in Nigeria’s press, or/and captured in Nollywood video films and popular music. I complement these with texts associated with limited ethnomethodological fieldwork. I examine these texts using theories of Oral Literature, Media Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Cultural Studies, and Anthropology against the backdrop of my nearly fifteen years field experience as a journalist and activist in Nigeria. I argue that besides their aesthetic appeal, “street stories” function powerfully as “hidden/public transcripts,” that offer important insights into popular culture’s role in participatory democracy, political oppression, and in narrating/performing the nation.

Subjects/Keywords: Orality, popular culture, media, film, postcolonial, Nigeria, democracy, music

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Otiono, N. (2011). Street stories: orality, media, popular culture and the postcolonial condition in Nigeria. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Alberta. Retrieved from https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/qj72p793q

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Otiono, Nduka. “Street stories: orality, media, popular culture and the postcolonial condition in Nigeria.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Alberta. Accessed January 17, 2020. https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/qj72p793q.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Otiono, Nduka. “Street stories: orality, media, popular culture and the postcolonial condition in Nigeria.” 2011. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Otiono N. Street stories: orality, media, popular culture and the postcolonial condition in Nigeria. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Alberta; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/qj72p793q.

Council of Science Editors:

Otiono N. Street stories: orality, media, popular culture and the postcolonial condition in Nigeria. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Alberta; 2011. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/qj72p793q


Rhodes University

3. Makhubu, Nomusa Mary. The fantastic subject: a visio-cultural study of Nollywood video-film.

Degree: PhD, Faculty of Humanities, Fine Art, 2014, Rhodes University

The increasing popularity of Nigerian video-film, defined as the ‘Nollywood phenomenon’ (Barrot 2008, Haynes 2010, Adesokan 2011), has attracted recent interdisciplinary academic attention, now known as ‘Nollywood Studies’. The aesthetics and ideological approach of Nollywood video-film are often differentiated from those of the long-established and illustrious African Cinema. Films of Africa are, however, generally characterised by seemingly unique forms of the fantastic – an uneasy theme in scholarship on Nollywood. Although Nollywood video-film is commended by some scholars, its representation of the supernatural and the fantastic is often perceived to be demeaning. Considering the complexity of fantastic themes in creative arts of Africa, this study contributes to this field of study by positioning Nollywood as an interventionist artistic practice that subverts the division between art and popular culture. Further, it considers how this positioning could shift our thinking about what constitutes art and creative practice in Africa. The distinctions between art and popular culture have been inherited from particularly Western disciplines. A critical analysis of the fantastic in Nollywood could expand interpretations of the broader uses of new media and appropriation and develop the discourse on contemporary creative practices of Africa and the parameters of the art history discipline. I interrogate the visual language of the video-film medium through a discussion of other forms of artistic media such as photography, video art, and performance art. The fantastic themes, such as ‘magic’, ‘fetishism’ and violence, conveyed through new media open up a field of questions regarding contemporary social-political dynamics. The cultural value of Nollywood video-film is often based on who makes it. As a proletarian product, Nollywood has been underestimated as a ‘low’ form of culture. Its use of appropriated material connotes the complex dialectics that formulate class difference. I consider how a positioning of video-film as a creative practice could be complicated by the fact that it also operates as a theocentric implement that is used by churches to evangelise. Moreover, I examine how ‘epic’ films construct idyllic notions of ‘ethnicity’ based on dialectics of rational/irrational or real/fantastic. Nollywood video-film also creates images of fantastic spaces. In this thesis, I address concepts of space in Nollywood from which fantastic desire is constructed. Advisors/Committee Members: Simbao, Ruth Kerkham, 1969-.

Subjects/Keywords: Motion picture industry  – Nigeria; Motion pictures  – Nigeria; Supernatural in motion pictures; Art and popular culture  – Nigeria; Fantasy in motion pictures; Fantasy in art

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Makhubu, N. M. (2014). The fantastic subject: a visio-cultural study of Nollywood video-film. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rhodes University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1021166

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Makhubu, Nomusa Mary. “The fantastic subject: a visio-cultural study of Nollywood video-film.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Rhodes University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1021166.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Makhubu, Nomusa Mary. “The fantastic subject: a visio-cultural study of Nollywood video-film.” 2014. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Makhubu NM. The fantastic subject: a visio-cultural study of Nollywood video-film. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rhodes University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1021166.

Council of Science Editors:

Makhubu NM. The fantastic subject: a visio-cultural study of Nollywood video-film. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rhodes University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10962/d1021166

.