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You searched for subject:(Police report writing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arkansas

1. Seawright, Leslie Eames. The Literacy Practices of Law Enforcement.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Arkansas

This dissertation investigates police report writing at the Jackson Police Department in Northwest Arkansas. It presents three primary research questions which are addressed through qualitative methods of interview, observation, and discourse analysis. 1) In what ways does police training address report writing? 2) What audience awareness do police officers have when writing reports? 3)How do actual report audience members read and evaluate reports? The police academy in this study fails to spend the necessary time discussing report writing. This is not rectified by the in-house training program, which pairs officers with Field Training Officers that are often reluctant or unqualified to address report writing. There is little to no discussion of the report genre, its purpose, or its readers. The readers of the report were unsatisfied with the report presented in the study. They complained that important information was left out and that details of the event were unclear. The audience response was completely underestimated by the officer who wrote the report. In his interview, he claimed all the information that he, his supervisor, prosecutor, and other readers would need was included in the report. This assumption was largely misplaced, and his limited audience awareness was demonstrated in this study. The primary finding of this dissertation is that current police training programs and literature fail to address important issues such as genre and audience in regards to report writing. This lack of training may result in officers that are unprepared to meet the literacy needs of judicial system. Advisors/Committee Members: David Jolliffe, Patrick Slattery, Elias D. Barajas.

Subjects/Keywords: Social Sciences; Discourse analysis; Law enforcement; Literacy practices; Police literacy; Police report writing; Police reports; Police training; Law Enforcement and Corrections; Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility; Legal Writing and Research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Seawright, L. E. (2012). The Literacy Practices of Law Enforcement. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arkansas. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Seawright, Leslie Eames. “The Literacy Practices of Law Enforcement.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arkansas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Seawright, Leslie Eames. “The Literacy Practices of Law Enforcement.” 2012. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Seawright LE. The Literacy Practices of Law Enforcement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/295.

Council of Science Editors:

Seawright LE. The Literacy Practices of Law Enforcement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arkansas; 2012. Available from: https://scholarworks.uark.edu/etd/295


University of North Texas

2. Stolp, Shelly J. A Validation Study of a Writing Skills Test for Police Recruit Applicants.

Degree: 2002, University of North Texas

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a direct test of higher-order and lower-order writing abilities needed for police report writing. This test was specifically designed to address report writing deficiencies experienced by police in the training academy. Descriptive statistics were examined, and relationships between this test and writing ability dimensions included on a separate, indirect, multiple choice test were investigated. Direct and indirect scores were correlated with training academy performance. Because both tests assessed higher-order and lower-order writing abilities, comparisons were made to determine which type of test was most appropriate for assessing the different types of writing skills. Results indicated that the direct test was a valid predictor of academy performance. Direct methods of measurement were found to be better than indirect methods for assessing higher-order writing skills. For lower-order writing skills, the indirect method appeared to be a better measure than the direct method. Advisors/Committee Members: Johnson, Douglas A., Halfhill, Terry, Sulzer, Jefferson L..

Subjects/Keywords: Police reports.; Report writing.; Police training.; Validation of writing skills test

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stolp, S. J. (2002). A Validation Study of a Writing Skills Test for Police Recruit Applicants. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3308/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stolp, Shelly J. “A Validation Study of a Writing Skills Test for Police Recruit Applicants.” 2002. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3308/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stolp, Shelly J. “A Validation Study of a Writing Skills Test for Police Recruit Applicants.” 2002. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stolp SJ. A Validation Study of a Writing Skills Test for Police Recruit Applicants. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2002. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3308/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stolp SJ. A Validation Study of a Writing Skills Test for Police Recruit Applicants. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2002. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3308/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Queens University

3. Kyres, Maria. From the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016 .

Degree: Cultural Studies, Queens University

In the last decade, the conversation surrounding racial profiling and carding in the city of Toronto garnered much public and scholarly attention. Many journalists, academics and activists have examined the Community Contacts Policy, also known as carding, as well as mass incarceration and the police shootings and killings of unarmed, young Black men. The Yonge Street Uprising and the carding controversy in Toronto serve as two case studies to explore the ways that Black men have been disproportionately profiled, policed and surveilled in this country, particularly in the province of Ontario. Despite the fact that the Yonge Street Uprising and the carding controversy occurred decades apart, a common thread throughout both cases was the narrative of Black male criminality. In addition, it became apparent that many of the practices employed in contemporary society, such as racial profiling, carding and mass incarceration were derived from slavery, with the goal of limiting the freedom and mobility of Black people. Therefore, an examination of Canada’s historical treatment of Black people is necessary in order to demonstrate how practices rooted in slavery, such as, fugitive slave advertisements and historical representations of Black criminality helped inform current police practices. Through an analysis of historical, legal, criminological, and critical race scholarship, this work seeks to examine how and why Black people, specifically Black men, were and continue to be disproportionately more likely to be policed, surveilled and incarcerated. In addition, neighborhood contexts were examined to determine whether there was a relationship between police stop and search practices among different neighborhoods. An analysis of quantitative and qualitative data gathered from various bodies of criminological and legal research, and reports commissioned by the Ontario government, provide support for the theory that the Canadian state criminalize and incarcerates certain populations it deems undesirable. Additionally, a consistent theme throughout this analysis was a heightened sense of anxiety and threat that whites have historically exemplified in relation to Black immigration, mobilization and resistance.

Subjects/Keywords: anti-Black racism; carding; racial profiling; police brutality; resistance; report writing; slavery

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kyres, M. (n.d.). From the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016 . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22750

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kyres, Maria. “From the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016 .” Thesis, Queens University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22750.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kyres, Maria. “From the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016 .” Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Kyres M. From the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016 . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22750.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Kyres M. From the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016 . [Thesis]. Queens University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/22750

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.