Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Phonetic Vowel Reduction). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Nadeu Rota, Marianna. The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish.

Degree: PhD, 0307, 2013, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Lexical-stress languages tend to display stress-induced vowel quality variation. In some languages the effect is very salient, resulting in a smaller vowel inventory in unstressed syllables and stress-conditioned rule-governed vowel alternations within paradigms (phonological vowel reduction). Other languages exhibit only slight phonetic variation between vowels in stressed and unstressed syllables (phonetic vowel reduction). Regarding the latter, two main hypotheses of how prosodic prominence affects vowel production have been proposed. Based on experimental data from Germanic languages, their empirical basis is still rather limited. A deeper understanding of the effects of prosodic prominence on vowels requires careful experimentation on an expanded set of languages. This dissertation investigates the effects of lexical stress and intonational pitch accent on vowel production in Spanish and Catalan. Although closely related, these languages differ importantly in their phonology. The five Spanish vowels can appear in stressed and unstressed syllables. In Central Catalan, however, seven stressed vowels alternate with only three unstressed vowels. Comparing these languages allows us to observe how the existence of phonological vowel reduction conditions the operation of phonetic reduction. Stress-induced vowel centralization or reduction has sometimes been attributed to decreased vowel duration in weak prosodic positions. Thus, the role of duration is further investigated by manipulating speech rate. The results show that in both languages vowels produced at faster rate are shorter and less peripheral than those produced at normal rate. Interestingly, the effects of stress differ in these languages. For Catalan, unstressed vowels are shorter and more centralized than stressed vowels. On the other hand, Spanish speakers exhibit individual effects of stress, suggesting that the use of vowel quality to signal stress is not conventionalized. In addition, in Catalan, the presence of a prenuclear accent in a broad focus utterance does not affect vowel quality or duration of lexically stressed vowels. Yet, lexically unstressed vowels are longer and have more extreme vowel formants under emphatic accent. This dissertation provides a comprehensive description of prosodic effects on vowel production in Catalan and Spanish, hence contributing to a body of cross-linguistic research dealing with the influence of prosody at the segmental level. Advisors/Committee Members: Hualde, Jose Ignacio (advisor), Hualde, Jose Ignacio (Committee Chair), Cole, Jennifer S. (committee member), Escobar, Anna Maria (committee member), Shih, Chilin (committee member), Shosted, Ryan K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Phonetic Vowel Reduction; Catalan; Spanish; Vowel Quality; Hyperarticulation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nadeu Rota, M. (2013). The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nadeu Rota, Marianna. “The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed August 12, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nadeu Rota, Marianna. “The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish.” 2013. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Nadeu Rota M. The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547.

Council of Science Editors:

Nadeu Rota M. The effects of lexical stress, intonational pitch accent, and speech rate on vowel quality in Catalan and Spanish. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45547

2. Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer L. The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations.

Degree: PhD, Romance Languages - Spanish and Portuguese Studies, 2013, University of Florida

The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis (PPH, Cabrell iAmaro & Rothman, 2010) attempts to reconcile evidence suggesting some L2learners, however rare, attain native-like L2 phonological systems with the observation that most do not. Considering existing L2 phonology research, it isnot clear that phonological differences between early and late acquirers mustbe the consequence of maturational effects on implicit mechanisms. Thus, to test how native-like adult-acquired systems are, the extent to which early- and late-acquired systems are equally resilient to influence from an L3 is examined.The PPH posits that native-like phonological systems acquired in adulthood are different from systems acquired in childhood with regards to relative stability. To test the PPH, a cross-sectional study of three types of English/Spanish bilinguals differing in age and context of acquisition (AoA) of Spanish was carried out to examine whether AoA determines relative vulnerability of the Spanish phonological system when exposed to L3 BP. In addition, a longitudinal case study was conducted, observing an L1 English/L2Spanish bilingual’s Spanish prior to BP exposure, and his BP and Spanish after 11weeks of BP immersion. The focus of the investigation was the acquisition of reduced word-final unstressed vowels [?] and [?] in BP and potential regressive influence on the perception, production, and processing of Spanish word-final unstressed [e] and [o]. Results from the cross-sectional study did not reveal any between-group differences in perception, production, or reaction time in terms of BP influence on Spanish. Therefore, these data align with the possibility that AoA does not determine the relative stability of a phonological system in terms of mental representation or processing. However,while these data do not support the PPH, evidence meeting the criteria for falsification of the PPH is also lacking. The case study results are indicative of rapid and permeating L3 influence on the learner’s Spanish processing during speech production, and a large-scale longitudinal investigation of the three bilingual types tested here is necessary to reveal whether early and late acquirers of Spanish are equally vulnerable to L3 influence and what the nature of any observed vulnerability is. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Rothman, Jason Leonardo (committee chair), Wiltshire, Caroline R (committee member), Lord-Ward, Gillian E (committee member), Wayland, Ratree (committee member), Kager, Rene W (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Language; Language acquisition; Learning; Lexical stress; Linguistics; Native languages; Phonetics; Phonology; Syllables; Vowels; acquisition  – brazilian  – heritage  – l1  – l2  – l3  – language  – optimality  – phonetic  – phonology  – portuguese  – reduction  – regressive  – spanish  – theory  – transfer  – vowel

…63 3 VOWEL REDUCTION… …66 3.2 Vowel Reduction… …64 3-1 Belorussian vowel reduction… …90 3-4 Standard American English word-final phonetic vowel inventory… …67 3.2.1.1 The BP vowel inventory and stress… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cabrelli Amaro, J. L. (2013). The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045225

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer L. “The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed August 12, 2020. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045225.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer L. “The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations.” 2013. Web. 12 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Cabrelli Amaro JL. The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. [cited 2020 Aug 12]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045225.

Council of Science Editors:

Cabrelli Amaro JL. The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2013. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0045225

.