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You searched for subject:(Perinatal Exposures AND Reproductive Health). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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UCLA

1. Meng, Qi. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; A Pooled Analysis in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

Degree: Epidemiology, 2018, UCLA

Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are widespread industrial pollutants that are extremely persistent in the environment. Animal studies have indicated that in-utero PFAS exposures can affect fetal growth, but findings from human studies are inconclusive. Few human studies have sufficient sample size to study the influence of PFASs on adverse birth outcomes. Here, we conducted a pooled analysis using data of 3,535 mothers and infant pairs using three sub-samples originating from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), and we evaluated the associations between prenatal PFASs exposures and birth outcomes. Maternal plasma concentrations of six types of PFASs in early pregnancy (around 8.7 gestational weeks) were studied. We found that each LN-ng/ml increase in PFOS, PFOA, PFNA and PFHpS was associated with a 65g, 51g, 52g or 56g decrease in birth weight. Moreover, we also found that prenatal PFOS, PFHpS, PFDA levels were associated with the risks for preterm birth (< 37 completed gestational week). Our findings strengthen the evidence that in-utero PFAS exposures may affect fetal growth. These findings raise concerns considering the ubiquitous contamination of PFASs in the environment. Public health strategies to prevent or lower PFASs exposures in pregnant women are needed.

Subjects/Keywords: Public health; Endocrine Disrupters; Perinatal Exposures and Reproductive Health

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APA (6th Edition):

Meng, Q. (2018). Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; A Pooled Analysis in the Danish National Birth Cohort. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/1xm8b172

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meng, Qi. “Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; A Pooled Analysis in the Danish National Birth Cohort.” 2018. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/1xm8b172.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meng, Qi. “Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; A Pooled Analysis in the Danish National Birth Cohort.” 2018. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Meng Q. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; A Pooled Analysis in the Danish National Birth Cohort. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/1xm8b172.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Meng Q. Prenatal Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Birth Outcomes; A Pooled Analysis in the Danish National Birth Cohort. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2018. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/1xm8b172

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. C.A. Snijder (Claudia). Work, environment and reproductive health.

Degree: 2012, Erasmus University Rotterdam

With the increasing labour force participation among women in Western countries, many women will work during their reproductive years. This will increase the likelihood that women during their reproductive years will be exposed to a variety of risk factors at work that may effect their reproductive abilities and the outcome of their pregnancy, such as spontaneous abortion, hypertensive disorders, intrauterine growth restriction, and adverse birth outcomes. Occupational exposures may also interact with foetal development, resulting in health effects in the offspring, such as congenital malformations and neurobehavioural disorders at young age. For several work-related risk factors the associations with reproductive effects are well established and translated into legislation, such as mandatory provisions for pregnant women preparing antineoplastic drugs or being exposed to lead. However, for many other work-related risk factors, the scientific evidence is less consistent. Work-related risk factors can be divided into chemical agents such as metals, solvents, pesticides, physical agents such as radiation and noise, and ergonomic factors such as heavy workload, shift work, and psychosocial stress.

Subjects/Keywords: occupational exposures; pregnancy; reproductive health

…1201. Part 1 Work and reproductive health Work and reproductive health 1. GENERAL… …Occupational exposures may also interact with foetal development, resulting in health effects in the… …stress.8 Research into occupational exposures and effects on the reproductive system has made… …effects on pregnancy and the foetus rather than on the reproductive health of women. Later, it… …aspects of reproductive health such as menstrual cycle disorders, and fertility. Attention has… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

(Claudia), C. S. (2012). Work, environment and reproductive health. (Thesis). Erasmus University Rotterdam. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/38782

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

(Claudia), C.A. Snijder. “Work, environment and reproductive health.” 2012. Thesis, Erasmus University Rotterdam. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1765/38782.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

(Claudia), C.A. Snijder. “Work, environment and reproductive health.” 2012. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

(Claudia) CS. Work, environment and reproductive health. [Internet] [Thesis]. Erasmus University Rotterdam; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1765/38782.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

(Claudia) CS. Work, environment and reproductive health. [Thesis]. Erasmus University Rotterdam; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1765/38782

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Michigan

3. Mandell, Rebecca Jill. Intersections of Environmental and Reproductive Justice: Examining Social Movement Efforts to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Toxic Exposures Harmful to Reproductive Health.

Degree: PhD, Health Behavior and Health Education, 2016, University of Michigan

Cross-movement collaboration is emerging amongst advocates at the intersection of environmental justice (EJ) and reproductive justice (RJ) to protect communities of color, Indigenous, and low-income communities from toxicants harmful to reproductive health. Little research exists on this intersection, and on cross-movement collaborations in general. This study examined the collective action frames (CAFs) of advocates at the EJ/RJ intersection. CAFs highlight how advocates identify problems and solutions, and motivate people to take action. Study objectives were to: 1) identify CAFs of advocates working to protect vulnerable communities from toxicants harmful to reproductive health; 2) identify tensions and synergies associated with these frames, and how diverging and converging frames impact cross-movement collaboration; and 3) identify social, political, and economic contextual factors that shape frameworks for action, and consider their implications for tensions and synergies across movements. Semi-structured interviews with 36 advocates and 4 funders across the United States were conducted and over 65 organizational documents were reviewed, resulting in the identification of two main CAFs. The first is the use of intersectionality as a core analytic and organizing principle focused on holistic conceptualizations of individuals, communities, problems, and solutions, and the need for cross-movement collaboration. The second is the use of reproductive health messaging to encourage policy and behavior change. This frame was perceived as highly resonant due to the relatability of reproductive health concerns. Analyses suggest that advocates see substantial value in cross-movement collaboration, including expanded bases of support; new perspectives; shared resources, information, and expertise; and the potential to disrupt social, political, and economic power imbalances that shape environmental reproductive health inequities, as well as other health and social inequities. However, the joining of numerous movements can create interpersonal complexity and competing priorities that influence the strength of alliances, message framing, agendas, and ultimately, the ability to reach shared goals. Investments in inter-group processes that address these tensions may provide opportunities to strengthen cross-movement collaborations. Understanding the CAFs that guide movement efforts can inform this process, as well as more broadly inform advocacy approaches to promote health and health equity, particularly those focused on policies and structural drivers of health. Advisors/Committee Members: Israel, Barbara Anne (committee member), Schulz, Amy Jo (committee member), O'Neill, Marie Sylvia (committee member), Summers, Cynthia (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: environmental justice; reproductive justice; collective action frames; toxic exposures; environmental health; reproductive health; Public Health; Social Sciences (General); Sociology; Health Sciences; Social Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mandell, R. J. (2016). Intersections of Environmental and Reproductive Justice: Examining Social Movement Efforts to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Toxic Exposures Harmful to Reproductive Health. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133194

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mandell, Rebecca Jill. “Intersections of Environmental and Reproductive Justice: Examining Social Movement Efforts to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Toxic Exposures Harmful to Reproductive Health.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133194.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mandell, Rebecca Jill. “Intersections of Environmental and Reproductive Justice: Examining Social Movement Efforts to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Toxic Exposures Harmful to Reproductive Health.” 2016. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Mandell RJ. Intersections of Environmental and Reproductive Justice: Examining Social Movement Efforts to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Toxic Exposures Harmful to Reproductive Health. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133194.

Council of Science Editors:

Mandell RJ. Intersections of Environmental and Reproductive Justice: Examining Social Movement Efforts to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Toxic Exposures Harmful to Reproductive Health. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/133194

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