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You searched for subject:(Performance anxiety Treatment). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Miami

1. Page, Molly L. Running as a Treatment for Music Performance Anxiety.

Degree: MM, Music Education and Music Therapy (Music), 2017, University of Miami

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceived levels of music performance anxiety (MPA) when participants are prescribed a running treatment. Three research questions were investigated throughout the study: 1) How does a running program influence perceived levels of MPA among music performers? 2) What other outcomes do students report they experience from the running treatment? 3) Does increased cardiovascular health result in lower levels of perceived MPA? A secondary research question was asked: Do perceived levels of MPA among participants vary based on degree concentration, instrument, gender, and age? Nineteen participants were recruited for this study from the Frost School of Music and were in varying areas of study at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral level. The 19 participants were divided into two groups, control or treatment. The control group did a breathing exercise prior to a performance while the treatment group followed a six-week running plan. Statistical results from this research were not significant, but participants in the running group did report higher levels of confidence, decreased stress and anxiety, and increased lung capacity. Participants in both groups had a similar decrease in anxiety levels after treatment, breathing exercise or running. Implications from these results and suggestions for further research are offered. Advisors/Committee Members: Stephen F. Zdzinski, Brian T. Powell, Joseph F. Signorile.

Subjects/Keywords: Music Performance Anxiety; Running; Exercise; Treatment; Music Education

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APA (6th Edition):

Page, M. L. (2017). Running as a Treatment for Music Performance Anxiety. (Thesis). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/652

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Page, Molly L. “Running as a Treatment for Music Performance Anxiety.” 2017. Thesis, University of Miami. Accessed January 20, 2020. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/652.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Page, Molly L. “Running as a Treatment for Music Performance Anxiety.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Page ML. Running as a Treatment for Music Performance Anxiety. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Miami; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/652.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Page ML. Running as a Treatment for Music Performance Anxiety. [Thesis]. University of Miami; 2017. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_theses/652

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Michigan State University

2. Miller, Tess Anissa. Why did it sound better in the practice room? : a guide to music performance anxiety and how to cope with it through journal writing.

Degree: DMA, Department of Music Performance, 2004, Michigan State University

Subjects/Keywords: Performance anxiety; Performance anxiety – Prevention; Performance anxiety – Treatment; Self-help techniques; Diaries – Authorship

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miller, T. A. (2004). Why did it sound better in the practice room? : a guide to music performance anxiety and how to cope with it through journal writing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:16804

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Tess Anissa. “Why did it sound better in the practice room? : a guide to music performance anxiety and how to cope with it through journal writing.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan State University. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:16804.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Tess Anissa. “Why did it sound better in the practice room? : a guide to music performance anxiety and how to cope with it through journal writing.” 2004. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Miller TA. Why did it sound better in the practice room? : a guide to music performance anxiety and how to cope with it through journal writing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan State University; 2004. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:16804.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller TA. Why did it sound better in the practice room? : a guide to music performance anxiety and how to cope with it through journal writing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan State University; 2004. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:16804

3. Liber, Juliëtte Margo. Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders.

Degree: 2008, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden University

The present dissertation had as its central focus the prediction of outcome of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. In the present study a selection of variables that were thought to have prognostic validity for successful cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) outcome were explored in a population of children with anxiety disorders. Eligible for participation were children aged 8-12 years (n = 133) attending primary education and diagnosed with Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Social Phobia (SOP) or Specific Phobia (SP). Participants were referred to the anxiety and depression outpatient clinics of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Leiden University Medical Center and Erasmus Medical Center, Sophia Children's Hospital in Rotterdam, in the Netherlands. Children were treated with a standardized and manualized CBT protocol (FRIENDS). Treatment outcome was assessed from a multi-informant perspective and determined with a method that addresses not only statistical significance but also clinically meaningful change. Variables that showed a significant predictive value were paternal anxiety and depressive symptoms, paternal rejection, maternal emotional warmth, comorbidity status, social performance, child-therapist alliance. Treatment format did not improve the prediction of treatment outcome. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Subjects/Keywords: CBT; Child anxiety; Child-therapist Alliance; Cognitive behavioral treatment; Comorbidity; Predictors; Social Performance; Treatment Format; CBT; Child anxiety; Child-therapist Alliance; Cognitive behavioral treatment; Comorbidity; Predictors; Social Performance; Treatment Format

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liber, J. M. (2008). Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/13259

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liber, Juliëtte Margo. “Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden University. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/13259.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liber, Juliëtte Margo. “Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders.” 2008. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Liber JM. Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden University; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/13259.

Council of Science Editors:

Liber JM. Friends or foes ?: predictors of treatment outcome of cognitieve behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/13259

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