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You searched for subject:(Performance Review Process). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Chearskul, Pimsinee. An Empirical Investigation of Performance Measurement System Use and Organizational Performance.

Degree: PhD, Industrial and Systems Engineering, 2010, Virginia Tech

This study contributes to the performance measurement (PM) literature by providing validated measures of PM system use and increased understanding of the impact of PM use on organizational outcomes. The purpose of this study was to articulate and test the relationships between PM system use, organizational learning, and organizational performance by taking into account the effects of PM-related technical factors (namely, PM system maturity and review process (RP) maturity). The concept of PM use was explored through the examination of its underlying processes, as reflected in the literature and two case studies, and a set of practices delineating PM use processes were proposed. Following a scale development approach, a measurement instrument of PM use was developed and validated with empirical data collected through a web-based questionnaire. The results from factor analysis showed the need to revise the initial set of PM use practices into five dimensions: monitoring, problem-finding, problem-solving, validating causal relationships, and validating improvement actions. Additionally, new measures were developed to assess PM and RP maturity factors. The factor analysis results identified four maturity variables: managed RP, optimized RP, PM design and PM implementation. Data from 216 managers participating in RP meetings were used to test the hypothesized relationships via partial least square (PLS). The results provide varying support for the hypotheses defined. First, the results show that monitoring directly impacts organizational performance while problem-finding, problem-solving and validating causal relationships indirectly impact organizational performance through shared vision and team learning. These indirect effects were positive in some cases and negative in others, depending on the direction of the relationship between the use variable and the organizational learning variable. Second, validating improvement actions did not influence organizational outcomes. Finally, the only moderating effect found was managed RP on the relationship between validating causal relationships and financial performance. Because of the weak support for moderating effects, an alternative model was proposed, exploring these maturity variables as antecedents of PM use. The results provided substantial support for this alternate model. Practical implications and areas for future research are also identified and discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Van Aken, Eileen M. (committeechair), Koelling, Charles Patrick (committee member), Kleiner, Brian M. (committee member), Terpenny, Janis P. (committee member), Farris, Jennifer A. (committeecochair).

Subjects/Keywords: Performance Review Process; Organizational Performance; Organizational Learning; Performance Measurement Use

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chearskul, P. (2010). An Empirical Investigation of Performance Measurement System Use and Organizational Performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30222

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chearskul, Pimsinee. “An Empirical Investigation of Performance Measurement System Use and Organizational Performance.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30222.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chearskul, Pimsinee. “An Empirical Investigation of Performance Measurement System Use and Organizational Performance.” 2010. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Chearskul P. An Empirical Investigation of Performance Measurement System Use and Organizational Performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30222.

Council of Science Editors:

Chearskul P. An Empirical Investigation of Performance Measurement System Use and Organizational Performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30222


Queensland University of Technology

2. Higgins, Paul Anthony. Reducing uncertainty in new product development.

Degree: 2008, Queensland University of Technology

Research and Development engineering is at the corner stone of humanity’s evolution. It is perceived to be a systematic creative process which ultimately improves the living standard of a society through the creation of new applications and products. The commercial paradigm that governs project selection, resource allocation and market penetration prevails when the focus shifts from pure research to applied research. Furthermore, the road to success through commercialisation is difficult for most inventors, especially in a vast and isolated country such as Australia which is located a long way from wealthy and developed economies. While market leading products are considered unique, the actual process to achieve these products is essentially the same; progressing from an idea, through development to an outcome (if successful). Unfortunately, statistics indicate that only 3% of ‘ideas’ are significantly successful, 4% are moderately successful, and the remainder ‘evaporate’ in that form (Michael Quinn, Chairman, Innovation Capital Associates Pty Ltd). This study demonstrates and analyses two techniques developed by the author which reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and development phase of new product development and therefore increase the probability of a successful outcome. This study expands the existing knowledge of the engineering design and development stage in the new product development process and is couched in the identification of practical methods, which have been successfully used to develop new products by Australian Small Medium Enterprise (SME) Excel Technology Group Pty Ltd (ETG). Process theory is the term most commonly used to describe scientific study that identifies occurrences that result from a specified input state to an output state, thus detailing the process used to achieve an outcome. The thesis identifies relevant material and analyses recognised and established engineering processes utilised in developing new products. The literature identified that case studies are a particularly useful method for supporting problem-solving processes in settings where there are no clear answers or where problems are unstructured, as in New Product Development (NPD). This study describes, defines, and demonstrates the process of new product development within the context of historical product development and a ‘live’ case study associated with an Australian Government START grant awarded to Excel Technology Group in 2004 to assist in the development of an image-based vehicle detection product. This study proposes two techniques which reduce uncertainty and thereby improve the probability of a successful outcome. The first technique provides a predicted project development path or forward engineering plan which transforms the initial ‘fuzzy idea’ into a potential and achievable outcome. This process qualifies the ‘fuzzy idea’ as a potential, rationale or tangible outcome which is within the capability of the organisation. Additionally, this process proposes that a tangible or…

Subjects/Keywords: new product development, technical specification development, product development specification, NPD Map, RETRO, process engineering, linear process, concurrent process, adaptive process, research and development, R&D, design and development; engineering process, engineering development, forward engineering, reverse engineering, new product concept, fuzzy idea, innovative idea, product complexity, degree of difficulty, SME, Startup, Excel Technology Group, ETG, QUT, PERT, GANTT; spatial representation, predicted development plan, alignment theory, process theory, milestone, performance measurement, quantifying design and development engineering, technical achievement, consumed resource, self learning, compounding knowledge, QA; quality management, technical specification, informed decision making, spatial variation, responsive action, spinoff project, vehicle detection, technical risk, non-existent rational outcome, process review, video detector, image-based vehicle detector

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Higgins, P. A. (2008). Reducing uncertainty in new product development. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/20273/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Higgins, Paul Anthony. “Reducing uncertainty in new product development.” 2008. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed August 25, 2019. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/20273/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Higgins, Paul Anthony. “Reducing uncertainty in new product development.” 2008. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Higgins PA. Reducing uncertainty in new product development. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2008. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/20273/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Higgins PA. Reducing uncertainty in new product development. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2008. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/20273/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.