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You searched for subject:(Peep show). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Bowling Green State University

1. Lewis, Melinda Maureen. Renegotiating British Identity Through Comedy Television.

Degree: MA, American Culture Studies/Popular Culture, 2009, Bowling Green State University

In conversations concerning American television abroad, conflict arises regarding the impact of American culture on countries without a strong means of autonomous media production. These discussions are usually confined to developing nations; however, Americanization still remains relevant to those nations who have a developed media industry. This thesis further examines the dynamic relationship between two media powerhouses, the United States and Great Britain. The purpose of this project is to explore how British television works with American television and popular culture in ways that do not interrupt the cultural education television provides. Beginning with a short history of the importation of programs between both countries, the thesis elaborates on the significance of television and comedy to culture. This history of media importation helps to set up how particular programs play with Americanness in ways that help to reassert a sense of Britishness. Using Andy Medhurst’s A National Joke, this project examines how television comedy is able to communicate, reassert, and redefine British identities. The shows chosen, Peep Show (2003- ) and Goodness Gracious Me (1998-2001) are two comedies that play such a role in renegotiating and redefining Britishness, by deconstructing the notion of identity as well as emphasizing Britishness through the representation of Americanness. Between Peep Show’s utilization of an American character as a means to differentiate British from American and Goodness Gracious Me’s use of familiar American formats to emphasize the impact of American television on British culture, both pinpoint the issues relevant to discussing contemporary British identity and through the lens of comedy provide a space for these issues to be deconstructed and challenged. Advisors/Committee Members: Morgan-Russell, Simon (Committee Chair), Cragin, Becca (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Mass Media; British Television; American Television; Television Studies; Comedy; British Popular Culture; American Popular Culture; Goodness Gracious Me; Peep Show

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APA (6th Edition):

Lewis, M. M. (2009). Renegotiating British Identity Through Comedy Television. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1245469847

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lewis, Melinda Maureen. “Renegotiating British Identity Through Comedy Television.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1245469847.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lewis, Melinda Maureen. “Renegotiating British Identity Through Comedy Television.” 2009. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Lewis MM. Renegotiating British Identity Through Comedy Television. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1245469847.

Council of Science Editors:

Lewis MM. Renegotiating British Identity Through Comedy Television. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1245469847


University of Colorado

2. Mazloom, Yasmin. I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space.

Degree: MFA, Art & Art History, 2018, University of Colorado

The life of immigrants is discussed in two chapters: living in the country of origin and living abroad. The space that exists in between these two countries and places, is diminished and not discussed because it is not physical but more of a mental space that is rarely recognized unless it is experienced firsthand. Even though only a minority of people will understand this liminal space, it is important to be aware of its existence. Those who reside in this space need to recognize they are not alone, even if their liminal space is different from others, so that they can easier cope with living in this world. This thesis explores my life as a female Iranian immigrant in this liminal space. I illustrate my post-immigration experience and life in between places by incorporating images into an optical device of my creation, which contains constructed photographs to inform my audience. Through this piece, I construct a place and time I have experienced since my immigration. In order to do so, I examine perspectives and elements that impact this liminality. In this paper I first define liminal space and show how this space is a product of a liminal identity, which for me is symbolic of a magic carpet. I conclude how these ideas connect to my work. Advisors/Committee Members: Melanie Walker, George Rivera, Luis Valdovino, Melinda Barlow, Alvin Gregorio.

Subjects/Keywords: Liminal Space; Magic Carpet; Shahre Farang; Post-immigration life; Peep show; Homi Bhabha; Optical Device; Iranian Immigrant; Edward Said; Marcel Duchamp; Art Practice; Composition; Contemporary Art; Creative Writing; Family, Life Course, and Society; Fiction; Fine Arts; Indigenous Studies; Islamic Studies; Islamic World and Near East History; Language Interpretation and Translation; Migration Studies; Nonfiction; Other Architecture; Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology; Other Languages, Societies, and Cultures; Other Music; Performance Studies; Place and Environment; Poetry; Reading and Language; Sociology of Culture; Theatre and Performance Studies; Translation Studies; Visual Studies; Women's History; Women's Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mazloom, Y. (2018). I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space. (Thesis). University of Colorado. Retrieved from https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mazloom, Yasmin. “I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space.” 2018. Thesis, University of Colorado. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mazloom, Yasmin. “I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space.” 2018. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Mazloom Y. I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mazloom Y. I Am a Magic Carpet: Life in a Liminal Space. [Thesis]. University of Colorado; 2018. Available from: https://scholar.colorado.edu/art_mfa/12

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Exeter

3. Wickham, Philip John. British situation comedy and "the culture of the New Capitalism".

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Exeter

This study examines British television situation comedy over the last fifteen years and analyses the genre as part of a discourse about the nature of modernity. In this period globalisation, technology and the rapid reassessment of formerly established social structures have created new modes of everyday existence that represent significant changes to people’s lives. The thesis argues that contemporary sitcoms address these shifts in social understanding and anxieties about contemporary British life. A wide range of texts are discussed, four in particular detail; Peep Show, Love Soup, Saxondale and Home Time; which explicitly try to form a dialogue with their audience about living in modernity. The thesis largely takes a methodological approach from Television Studies, referencing scholars from the discipline, in particular John Ellis’s concepts of “working through” and employing a significant amount of textual analysis. Chapter two looks at the context of television in this changing world and chapter three analyses how sitcom as a genre has redefined its forms. Chapter four identifies the importance of ‘tone’ in comedy and analyses how modernity demands new modes of address for comedy to meet the expectations of its audience. The study demonstrates how texts balance new approaches with continuities drawn from the existing sitcom tradition. In order to interrogate the nature of social change and its effects, chapter one engages with the work of a number of social theorists. In particular it analyses the recent writings of Richard Sennett and Zygmunt Bauman, who identify contemporary life as “the culture of the new capitalism” and “liquid modernity” respectively. They consider how such change might affect how individuals feel about themselves and their place in society. Throughout, the thesis demonstrates how this work might be applied to the study of sitcom and combines social theory with a detailed analysis of this television form in transformation, arguing that sitcom remains a resonant site for audiences to participate in a productive discourse about how we live today.

Subjects/Keywords: 791.45; television; sitcom; modernity; comedy; contemporary Britain; Richard Sennett; Zygmunt Bauman; Peep Show

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wickham, P. J. (2013). British situation comedy and "the culture of the New Capitalism". (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Exeter. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10871/8983

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wickham, Philip John. “British situation comedy and "the culture of the New Capitalism".” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Exeter. Accessed October 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10871/8983.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wickham, Philip John. “British situation comedy and "the culture of the New Capitalism".” 2013. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Wickham PJ. British situation comedy and "the culture of the New Capitalism". [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Exeter; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10871/8983.

Council of Science Editors:

Wickham PJ. British situation comedy and "the culture of the New Capitalism". [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Exeter; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10871/8983

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