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York University

1. Hugill, David Warren. The Urban Politics of Settler-Colonialism: Articulations of the Colonial Relation in Postwar Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945-1975 (AND BEYOND).

Degree: PhD, Geography, 2015, York University

This dissertation documents some of the ways that colonial practices and mentalities have shaped relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in the historical and material conjuncture of Minneapolis, Minnesota, with a focus on the period 1945 to 1975. Building on political and geographical literature concerned with the enduring effects of settler-colonization in North American urban environments, my inquiry starts from the premise that the “colonial relation” retains a persistent structural trace in Minneapolis, manifesting through a series of practices and dynamics that operate to enforce particular forms of social, economic, and territorial domination. I begin by demonstrating that Indigenous peoples in the area were territorially and economically displaced in the construction of the newcomer settlement that became Minneapolis, which I describe by looking critically at the life of one of the city’s early “city builders,” Thomas Barlow Walker. I then expand this discussion by developing a series of arguments that demonstrate how the “colonial relation” has articulated in the Phillips neighborhood of South Minneapolis, which, for a variety of reasons, emerged as a site of significant Indigenous residential concentration and congregation in the aftermath of the Second World War. In particular, I consider how colonial practices and mentalities hastened Indigenous migration to the inner-city, constrained the knowledge practices of non-Indigenous advocacy organizations interested in alleviating urban forms of Indigenous marginalization, and shaped a culture of inner-city “racialized policing.” I then conclude with a brief and speculative look at the colonial relation in present-day Minneapolis, examining some of the ways that both Indigenous marginality and economic prosperity are bound up with broader deployments of state violence, particularly through the activities of local weapons manufacturers. Throughout, I argue that to make sense of the distinct patterns of group differentiated insecurity that disproportionately plagued Indigenous migrants to Minneapolis in the postwar period and the decades that followed, we need to think beyond the immediacy of the present and pay close heed to the ways in which colonially-inflected legacies, material distributions, and knowledge practices continue to have distinct effects. Advisors/Committee Members: Wood, Patricia Katharine (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Geography; Native American studies; American studies; colonialism; settler-colonialism; colonial legacies; colonial relationships; colonial relation; empire; imperialism; American empire; primitive accumulation; accumulation by dispossession; urban geography; urban political economy; Indigenous urbanization; urban Indigenous people; urban crisis; urban politics; urban change; metropolitan change; urban renewal; suburbanization; interstate construction; racism; racialization; urban racism; inner-city stigmatization; poverty; Phillips neighborhood; East Franklin Avenue; Minneapolis; Twin Cities; St. Paul; Minnesota; United States; urban social movements; police brutality; racialized policing; housing discrimination; devalorization cycle; history of the Dakota people; history of the Anishinaabeg people; the Honeywell corporation; land mine manufacturing; Twin Cities weapons manufacturing; League of Women Voters of Minnesota; Elizabeth Ebbott; Phillips Works; Training Center for Community Programs; University of Minnesota; Urban Indian Relocation Program; Thomas Barlow Walker; Walker Art Gallery; Hmong diaspora in the United States; Somali diaspora in the United States; liberal anti-racism; New Deal Order; Democratic-Farmer-Labor party; American Indian Movement; Black Panther Party; War on Poverty; Minnesota politics.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hugill, D. W. (2015). The Urban Politics of Settler-Colonialism: Articulations of the Colonial Relation in Postwar Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945-1975 (AND BEYOND). (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30638

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hugill, David Warren. “The Urban Politics of Settler-Colonialism: Articulations of the Colonial Relation in Postwar Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945-1975 (AND BEYOND).” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30638.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hugill, David Warren. “The Urban Politics of Settler-Colonialism: Articulations of the Colonial Relation in Postwar Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945-1975 (AND BEYOND).” 2015. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Hugill DW. The Urban Politics of Settler-Colonialism: Articulations of the Colonial Relation in Postwar Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945-1975 (AND BEYOND). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30638.

Council of Science Editors:

Hugill DW. The Urban Politics of Settler-Colonialism: Articulations of the Colonial Relation in Postwar Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1945-1975 (AND BEYOND). [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30638

2. Cabezas Pino, Angélica María. "This is my Face": Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile.

Degree: 2018, University of Manchester

The research project ´This is my Face: Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile´ is an interdisciplinary project that explores ´collaborative mise en-scène´ as a method to further understand the sense-making processes around the biographical disruption caused by HIV. It combines Anthropology and Arts methods as part of the PhD in Anthropology, Media and Performance, a practice-based program that fosters interdisciplinary approaches to the production of original knowledge, based on self-reflexive and critical research practices (The University of Manchester, 2018). Relying on the specific competences of photography and film and the co-creation of an ethnographic context based in hermeneutic reflexivity, the collaborators on the project created and explored representations of critical life events, in order to make sense of the disruption HIV brought to their lives. The collaborators were highly stigmatised individuals living with HIV, which hindered their possibilities for sharing narratives and for reflection, and as such, made it more difficult for them to come to terms with a diagnosis they described as a ´fracture´ in their lives. This project analyses the creative process of ´collaborative mise-en-scène´ as a way to provide further opportunities for reflexivity and sense making, a method that departs from their everyday face-to-face encounters as means of understanding what they are going through. Representations of life events emerged from our practice, as well as evocations, which provided a means by which to understand their experiences with HIV, and opened up ways to resignify their past experiences and projections of the future. Photography and film offered their specific expressive competences to the project, but also gave the possibility of making visible the collaborators´ experiences in order to promote a dialogue with others, moving beyond our creative encounters. Therefore, their evocations became ´statements´ of what it means to live with HIV in Chile, and at the same time, by taking part in its creation, it provided access to the particularities of the sense-making process in which those images were embedded. This collaborative creative process opened up ways to highlight the relevance for sense-making in face-to-face encounters, demonstrating that hermeneutic reflexivity as a practice-based form of mutual questioning can promote a critical engagement with life trajectories and with others beyond our practice.

Film "This is my face" (availble online on vimeo link. Included in the thesis)

Photo-book "This is my Face" Exhibition catalogue

Advisors/Committee Members: IRVING, ANDREW A, Sjoberg, Johannes, Irving, Andrew.

Subjects/Keywords: HIV; collaborative; sense Making; stigma; HIV stigma; life disruption; visual Anthropology; practice-based; documentary Film; photo; collaborative mise-en-scene; autobiography; ethnographic Film; collaborative Anthropology; collaborative ethnography; collaboration; reflexivity; hermeneutic reflexivity; reflexive Ethnography; Chile; self-reflexive; representation; visual methods; photography; ethnographic images; practice based; illness; chronic illness; co-creation; ethnographic context; collaborators; narratives; storytelling; face-to-face; disclosure; evocations; experiences; memory; imagination; public anthroplogy; medical anthropology; applied anthropology; interdisciplinary; ethics; strategies; tactics; suffering; pain; men; Lemebel; Puente Alto; anthropology,media and performance; participatory action research; post-dictatorship; antiretroviral therapy; homophobia; machismo; homosexuality; trauma; enstrangement; This is my face; Russian formalists; Photobook; Angelica Cabezas; Sarah Pink; Andrew irving; Johannes Sjoberg; Paul farmer; Alan Radley; Mattia fumanti; Martin Heidegger; Philippe Lejeune; Marc Auge; Cathy Caruth; Smith and Watson; Michel De Certeau; Bordwell and Thompson; Viktor Shklovsky; Jay Ruby; Edward Casey; Susan Sontag; Michael Bury; Orlando Fals-Borda; Erving Goffman; Susan Hogan; Luke Eric Lassiter; Henri Lefebvre; Maggie O'Neill; Mary Warnock

…their local context. Paul Farmer (1992) suggests that in order to understand HIV, we… …and Farmer, 2005), and a growing number of HIV tests can lead to a reduction in the new… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cabezas Pino, A. M. (2018). "This is my Face": Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315600

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cabezas Pino, Angélica María. “"This is my Face": Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315600.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cabezas Pino, Angélica María. “"This is my Face": Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile.” 2018. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Cabezas Pino AM. "This is my Face": Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315600.

Council of Science Editors:

Cabezas Pino AM. "This is my Face": Audio-visual practice as collaborative sense-making among men living with HIV in Chile. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2018. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:315600

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