Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Parental Restrictions). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of New Orleans

1. Zeringue, Megan M. Parenting Style and Adolescent Gender as Moderators of the Association between Parental Restrictions and Adolescents' Risky Driving.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2016, University of New Orleans

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of teenage deaths in the United States, highlighting the need for ways to reduce teenage driver crash rates. Adolescents (n = 176, M age = 16.4 years, 53% female) and their parents (n = 204, 71% mothers) self-reported on parenting style, driving restrictions, and risky driving. Results showed that more parental restrictions were associated with less adolescent risky driving. Three-way interactions were found such that more restrictions were associated with less concurrent risky driving in boys only under conditions of high parental warmth, structure, or autonomy support. Parenting style generally did not moderate the association for girls, although more restrictions were associated with less risky driving one year later for girls only in the context of low autonomy support. Findings are discussed in terms of how parenting may differentially affect risky driving as a form of risk-taking versus risky driving stemming from inexperience. Advisors/Committee Members: Laird, Robert, Rubens, Sonia, Scaramella, Laura.

Subjects/Keywords: Teenage Risky Driving; Parenting; Parental Restrictions; Self-Determination Theory; Developmental Psychology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zeringue, M. M. (2016). Parenting Style and Adolescent Gender as Moderators of the Association between Parental Restrictions and Adolescents' Risky Driving. (Thesis). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from http://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/2285

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zeringue, Megan M. “Parenting Style and Adolescent Gender as Moderators of the Association between Parental Restrictions and Adolescents' Risky Driving.” 2016. Thesis, University of New Orleans. Accessed May 28, 2017. http://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/2285.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zeringue, Megan M. “Parenting Style and Adolescent Gender as Moderators of the Association between Parental Restrictions and Adolescents' Risky Driving.” 2016. Web. 28 May 2017.

Vancouver:

Zeringue MM. Parenting Style and Adolescent Gender as Moderators of the Association between Parental Restrictions and Adolescents' Risky Driving. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2016. [cited 2017 May 28]. Available from: http://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/2285.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zeringue MM. Parenting Style and Adolescent Gender as Moderators of the Association between Parental Restrictions and Adolescents' Risky Driving. [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2016. Available from: http://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/2285

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

2. Jordan, James Lawrence. PARENTAL MANAGEMENT OF TEEN DRIVERS AFTER RECEIVING THEIR FIRST TRAFFIC CITATION AND HAVING ATTENDED THE 4-H CARTEENS PROGRAM.

Degree: PhD, Human and Community Resource Development, 2010, The Ohio State University

The United States is a vehicle-dependent society and allows teens to obtaindrivers licenses at age 16 or younger. Many factors have been linked to teen riskydriving behaviors that resulted in teens receiving their first citations. This was the first study to investigate parental management of teens after theyreceived their first citations for risky driving behaviors and the effect of parentattendance at 4-H CARTEENS, a remedial program developed by The Ohio StateUniversity Extension (4-H Youth Development program), Ohio State Highway Patrol,and the county juvenile justice system. The study used a quasi-experimental design to analyze 243 teen drivers inattendance at 4-H CARTEENS who responded to a survey about risky drivingbehaviors, parental control, and parental restrictions; 187 respondents completed the study. Most of the teens were 17 years old (55%), male (51%), and White (92%), andmost were high school juniors and seniors who had received their drivers license atage 16 (86%). The most frequent risky driving behavior was “driving distractions,”and the least frequent was “substance abuse driving.” Young male drivers reported more risky driving behaviors on average (29more times per month) than did females. The teen drivers indicated that their parents ensured they had enough practice driving before getting their license. They strongly agreed with the restriction of not drinking and driving. The teen drivers responded more in agreement to parent control issues than parent restrictions. Parent management for control and restrictions was related to reducing risky driving behaviors. As teens advanced in school and drove more frequently per week, their risky driving behaviors increased. The data showed a reduction in risky driving behaviors from Time 1 to Time 2 with a medium effect after the teens attended the 4-H CARTEENS program. 4-H CARTEENS had a medium effect for reducing risky driving behaviors in the areas of speeding, lane use, and vehicle control. 4-H CARTEENS counties with parents attending reported fewer risky driving behaviors than did those counties without parents attending. The regression analysis indicated that more parent management control and less frequency of driving per week predicted a reduction of risky driving behaviors. Overall, this investigation found that the 4-H CARTEENS program reducedteens’ risky driving behaviors. Future studies should replicate this study using a larger sample size involving more 4-H CARTEENS counties to assess the program inreducing risky driving behaviors and measure the importance of parents attending the 4-H CARTEENS program with their teens. Advisors/Committee Members: Scheer, Scott (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Families and Family Life; risky driving behaviors; parental control; parental restrictions; 4-H CARTEENS; driver intervention program

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jordan, J. L. (2010). PARENTAL MANAGEMENT OF TEEN DRIVERS AFTER RECEIVING THEIR FIRST TRAFFIC CITATION AND HAVING ATTENDED THE 4-H CARTEENS PROGRAM. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1282172765

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jordan, James Lawrence. “PARENTAL MANAGEMENT OF TEEN DRIVERS AFTER RECEIVING THEIR FIRST TRAFFIC CITATION AND HAVING ATTENDED THE 4-H CARTEENS PROGRAM.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed May 28, 2017. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1282172765.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jordan, James Lawrence. “PARENTAL MANAGEMENT OF TEEN DRIVERS AFTER RECEIVING THEIR FIRST TRAFFIC CITATION AND HAVING ATTENDED THE 4-H CARTEENS PROGRAM.” 2010. Web. 28 May 2017.

Vancouver:

Jordan JL. PARENTAL MANAGEMENT OF TEEN DRIVERS AFTER RECEIVING THEIR FIRST TRAFFIC CITATION AND HAVING ATTENDED THE 4-H CARTEENS PROGRAM. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2010. [cited 2017 May 28]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1282172765.

Council of Science Editors:

Jordan JL. PARENTAL MANAGEMENT OF TEEN DRIVERS AFTER RECEIVING THEIR FIRST TRAFFIC CITATION AND HAVING ATTENDED THE 4-H CARTEENS PROGRAM. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2010. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1282172765


University of Rochester

3. Coles, Mandy S. How are state abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?.

Degree: MS, 2009, University of Rochester

Purpose: It is well documented that legislation which restricts abortion access decreases abortion rates. It is less well understood whether these statutes affect unintended birth. In this study, we examined the relationship between restrictive abortion legislation and unintended birth among minors. Methods: The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) monitors self-reported maternal experiences among women who deliver a live-born infant. Using 2000-2005 PRAMS data, we examined associations between pregnancy intention (defined as intended, mistimed, or unwanted) and state legal statutes affecting women’s access to abortion services (parental involvement laws, Medicaid funding restrictions, and mandatory waiting periods). We used multinomial logistic regression, controlling for individual demographic characteristics, state factors, and geographic and time trends to identify the impact of restrictive abortion legislation on minors’ pregnancy intention. Subgroup analyses were done for Black and Hispanic minors. Results: Study sample included 8,356 minors between 11-17 yrs old, who reported 6,800 unintended births (81%): 15% were reported as unwanted and 66% were reported as mistimed. Bivariate analyses demonstrated associations between parental involvement laws and higher rates of unwanted (17% vs 12%, p<0.001) teen birth, as well as associations between mandatory waiting periods and higher rates of both mistimed (67% vs 66%, p=0.039) and unwanted (17% vs 14%, p=0.004) teen birth. When we controlled for individual and state factors in our multivariate model, we found that non-Black, non-Hispanic minors living in states with parental involvement laws reported higher rates of unwanted birth (RR 1.79, p=0.041). Medicaid funding restrictions were associated lower rates of unwanted birth among Hispanic teens; no association for this statute was noted in the overall population. Conclusions: Although this study cannot determine causality, we found higher rates of unwanted birth among minors living in states with parental involvement laws, as well as higher rates of unwanted birth among Hispanic teens living in states with Medicaid funding restrictions. Further evaluation of factors associated with state laws that restrict access may identify other opportunities for policy change to reduce unwanted pregnancy and birth among teens.

Subjects/Keywords: Abortion; Minors; Adolescents; Parental Involvement Laws; Medicaid Funding Restrictions; Mandatory Waiting Periods; Pregnancy Intention; Unintended Birth; Unwanted Birth

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coles, M. S. (2009). How are state abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?. (Masters Thesis). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/8126

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coles, Mandy S. “How are state abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Rochester. Accessed May 28, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/8126.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coles, Mandy S. “How are state abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?.” 2009. Web. 28 May 2017.

Vancouver:

Coles MS. How are state abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Rochester; 2009. [cited 2017 May 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/8126.

Council of Science Editors:

Coles MS. How are state abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?. [Masters Thesis]. University of Rochester; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/8126

.