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You searched for subject:(PVAAS). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Youngstown State University

1. Underwood, Julian E. Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness: Building-Level Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) Scores Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy.

Degree: Doctor of Education (Educational Leadership), Department of Educational Foundations, Research, Technology and Leadership, 2018, Youngstown State University

The Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness System strives to place an effective teacher in every classroom. This evaluation system incorporates the use of value-added growth measures, not only at the teacher level, but also at the building level. These building level scores are included in every teacher’s yearly evaluation. This study sought to determine if a relationship existed between the value-added scores and collective teacher efficacy; the faculty’s collective belief that they have the capabilities to make an educational difference for their students. 120 middle school teachers from southwestern Pennsylvania were surveyed using the Collective Teacher Beliefs Scale. The study found that a relationship did not exist between the value-added scores and collective teacher efficacy. Additionally, the relationship between value-added scores and several other variables was examined. The socio-economic status of the building was found to serve as a moderator for collective teacher efficacy. Finally, this study provides administrators with examples of how to boost collective teacher efficacy and in turn improve teacher effectiveness. Advisors/Committee Members: Larwin, Karen (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Collective Teacher Efficacy; PVAAS; Value-added

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Underwood, J. E. (2018). Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness: Building-Level Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) Scores Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Youngstown State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1526918160133655

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Underwood, Julian E. “Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness: Building-Level Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) Scores Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Youngstown State University. Accessed May 23, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1526918160133655.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Underwood, Julian E. “Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness: Building-Level Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) Scores Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy.” 2018. Web. 23 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Underwood JE. Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness: Building-Level Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) Scores Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Youngstown State University; 2018. [cited 2019 May 23]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1526918160133655.

Council of Science Editors:

Underwood JE. Pennsylvania Educator Effectiveness: Building-Level Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) Scores Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Youngstown State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ysu1526918160133655


Penn State University

2. Stout, Wilbur L. School Level Factors Associated With Pennsylvania High Schools That Exceed PVAAS Growth Projections In Reading.

Degree: EdD, Educational Leadership, 2013, Penn State University

An abundance of research exists related to student and school factors that influence student achievement; however, due to the increase in value-added assessment models and the number of states that are instituting such models, there is a significant need to investigate school characteristics and programs that promote academic growth as measured through value-added analysis. The research study was an effort to explore programs and characteristics common among high schools in Pennsylvania that issue reading growth projections provided by the Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System. High growth reading high schools were identified using Average Growth Index (AGI) scores. Sixty-five high school principals working in these high reading growth schools completed a survey and provided insight into those characteristics and programs in their schools that promoted reading development. Six onsite visits were completed and personal interviews were conducted with principals of these high growth schools to develop information regarding what these schools did to attain such positive results. Additionally, a multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine if there was a relationship between a school’s three-year mean AGI score and several variables. Results of the study concluded that high schools that exceed PVAAS reading projections contained the following characteristics and/or programs: (a) had remediation and/or tutoring programs in place for students who are not meeting the prescribed academic standards, (b) obtained, reviewed, and utilized student data to maximize the learning potential, (c) utilized a focused approach to staff development, and (d) had high expectations for student achievement as shared by the community, parents, staff, and students. Regression analyses showed that Graduation Rate, “Other” Race, Percentage of Low Income Students, Number of Students, and Math Growth Indexes demonstrated a relationship to the reading growth scores in Pennsylvania high schools.

Subjects/Keywords: PVAAS; Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment; Value-Added; Reading Growth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stout, W. L. (2013). School Level Factors Associated With Pennsylvania High Schools That Exceed PVAAS Growth Projections In Reading. (Doctoral Dissertation). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/18675

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stout, Wilbur L. “School Level Factors Associated With Pennsylvania High Schools That Exceed PVAAS Growth Projections In Reading.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Penn State University. Accessed May 23, 2019. https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/18675.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stout, Wilbur L. “School Level Factors Associated With Pennsylvania High Schools That Exceed PVAAS Growth Projections In Reading.” 2013. Web. 23 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Stout WL. School Level Factors Associated With Pennsylvania High Schools That Exceed PVAAS Growth Projections In Reading. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Penn State University; 2013. [cited 2019 May 23]. Available from: https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/18675.

Council of Science Editors:

Stout WL. School Level Factors Associated With Pennsylvania High Schools That Exceed PVAAS Growth Projections In Reading. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Penn State University; 2013. Available from: https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/18675

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