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You searched for subject:(PCR duplications). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Eastern Michigan University

1. Biwa, Valerie. The Sojourner experience: An exploration of identity transformation through communication.

Degree: MA, Communication, Media and Theatre Arts, 2016, Eastern Michigan University

This exploratory research focuses on the relationship between communication and identity transformation in the sojourner experience. It inquires the following: RQ1: How does communication affect the identity transformation process of sojourners? RQ2: How does identity transformation affect the way sojourners communicate? Ten participants from six countries were interviewed in a forty (40) minute interview session. A qualitative methodology with an open-minded exploratory approach using semi-structured questions to guide the interview was employed. A grounded-in-data coding and Owen’s criteria for identifying themes (Owen, 1984) was used to identify emerging themes and overlapping narratives. The study revealed five themes from the “living abroad” experience: changing the way I talk, interacting with the host culture, meeting new people, the college experience, the self; and five themes from the “at-home” experience: I am more, is this home? people at home, at work, and where do I fit in to answer RQ1 and RQ2, respectively. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis P. O'Grady, Nick Romerhausen, Tsai-Shan Shen.

Subjects/Keywords: DNA Sequence; Genomic sequencing; Next Generation Sequencing; PCR duplications; Personalized Medicine; Polyclonal formation; Arts and Humanities; Theatre and Performance Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Biwa, V. (2016). The Sojourner experience: An exploration of identity transformation through communication. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from https://commons.emich.edu/theses/794

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Biwa, Valerie. “The Sojourner experience: An exploration of identity transformation through communication.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed September 29, 2020. https://commons.emich.edu/theses/794.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Biwa, Valerie. “The Sojourner experience: An exploration of identity transformation through communication.” 2016. Web. 29 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Biwa V. The Sojourner experience: An exploration of identity transformation through communication. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 29]. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/794.

Council of Science Editors:

Biwa V. The Sojourner experience: An exploration of identity transformation through communication. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/794


Eastern Michigan University

2. Aldilaimi, Akram. A comparison of two methods of template amplification for next generation sequencing: Implications of polyclonal formation on DNA sequence for several cancer tissues.

Degree: MS, Health Sciences, 2016, Eastern Michigan University

Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has advanced the field of personalized medicine by predicting effective treatments for cancer patients using genomic sequence data, including the detection of oncogenes (genes involved in cancer development). Simultaneous amplification of multiple DNA templates (referred to as polyclonal formation) is a primary disadvantage when preparing templates for NGS resulting in redundancies in DNA sequences or nonspecific noise in the sequencing. This study was conducted to compare DNA templates for sequencing prepared using two instruments the Thermo Fisher Ion Chef (IC) and Thermo Fisher OneTouch-2 (OT2). Six sequencing metrics obtained from 114 sequencing trials for evaluation: polyclonal reads, total sequencing reads, empty microcell well reads, no-template reads, useable number reads, and library number reads. A comparison of mean sequencing metrics between the IC and OT2 methods established that for four of the six metrics, IC was the preferred operation for DNA template preparation due to the less polyclonal formation. Advisors/Committee Members: Irwin Martin, David Kass, Joseph Paulauskis.

Subjects/Keywords: DNA Sequence; Genomic sequencing; Next Generation Sequencing; PCR duplications; Personalized Medicine; Polyclonal formation; Medicine and Health Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aldilaimi, A. (2016). A comparison of two methods of template amplification for next generation sequencing: Implications of polyclonal formation on DNA sequence for several cancer tissues. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from https://commons.emich.edu/theses/790

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aldilaimi, Akram. “A comparison of two methods of template amplification for next generation sequencing: Implications of polyclonal formation on DNA sequence for several cancer tissues.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed September 29, 2020. https://commons.emich.edu/theses/790.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aldilaimi, Akram. “A comparison of two methods of template amplification for next generation sequencing: Implications of polyclonal formation on DNA sequence for several cancer tissues.” 2016. Web. 29 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Aldilaimi A. A comparison of two methods of template amplification for next generation sequencing: Implications of polyclonal formation on DNA sequence for several cancer tissues. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 29]. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/790.

Council of Science Editors:

Aldilaimi A. A comparison of two methods of template amplification for next generation sequencing: Implications of polyclonal formation on DNA sequence for several cancer tissues. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/790


University of New Mexico

3. Farslow, James Charles. Gene duplications during experimental evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans : duplication rates and evolutionary responses.

Degree: UNM Biology Department, 2015, University of New Mexico

Copy-number variants (CNVs) are a ubiquitous form of genetic variation. How often this form of variation arises and its adaptive significance are active areas of contemporary research. This work presents evidence regarding both of these subjects. First, it demonstrates that gene duplications occur at a frequency two orders of magnitude greater than point mutations. Specifically, the gene duplication rate is estimated to be 1.2 x 10-7/gene/generation, compared to a point mutation rate on the order of ~10-9/site/ generation. Second, it was found that populations in a low state of fitness due to mutation accumulation could recover some or all of their fitness over short spans of generations concurrent with an increase in frequency of duplications and deletions that arose during the recovery process. The pattern of frequency increase among CNVs over generations during recovery was consistent with the signature of positive selection. The median size of duplications that were identified after selection for ~200 generations were significantly larger (191.5 kb) than both duplications that occurred spontaneously (2 kb) in the absence of selection and deletions identified after selection for ~200 generations (12.5 kb). The median number of genes contained in the duplications during recovery was 38, evincing the ability of these events to increase the genetic information available for selection to act on. These results clearly demonstrate that gene duplication and deletion processes contribute significantly to the adaptability of populations. Advisors/Committee Members: Bergthorsson, Ulfar, Natvig, Donald, Witt, Christopher, Gerrish, Phil.

Subjects/Keywords: Caenorhabditis elegans; Gene duplications and deletions; Copy number variants; Experimental evolution; Quantitative PCR; qPCR statistical analysis; Positive selection; Genome information content; Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farslow, J. C. (2015). Gene duplications during experimental evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans : duplication rates and evolutionary responses. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/35

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farslow, James Charles. “Gene duplications during experimental evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans : duplication rates and evolutionary responses.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed September 29, 2020. https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/35.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farslow, James Charles. “Gene duplications during experimental evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans : duplication rates and evolutionary responses.” 2015. Web. 29 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Farslow JC. Gene duplications during experimental evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans : duplication rates and evolutionary responses. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 29]. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/35.

Council of Science Editors:

Farslow JC. Gene duplications during experimental evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans : duplication rates and evolutionary responses. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2015. Available from: https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/biol_etds/35

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