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Stockholm University

1. Moëll, Birger. Living SMART : an Internet course for adults with ADHD.

Degree: Psychology, 2013, Stockholm University

ADHD affects executive functions and pharmacological treatment is the most common intervention. Medication is ineffective for some and psychosocial interventions are scarcely available. CBT that teaches organizational skills for managing ADHD-symptoms has shown promising results. Smartphones can help individuals perform executive tasks such as planning and organization and they could be efficacious as a support tool for ADHD patients. The current study is a RCT that compares an online course (n=29) based on previously effective CBT treatments for ADHD to a wait-list control (n=29). The intervention focused on teaching the use of an online calendar and smartphone apps. The intervention brought significant improvement (p < 0.001) to participants regarding ADHD symptoms and 38% of participants were considered clinically significantly improved. This indicates that online treatments using IT-tools for ADHD is effective and that smartphones can be used as a tool for aiding individuals with impairments in executive functions.

Subjects/Keywords: ADHD; Internet delivered treatment for ADHD; Online CBT; Online treatment; Smartphone treatment for ADHD; Smartphone treatment; Inattention; Hyperactivity; Impulsivity; Procrastination; Organizational skills; Online calendar; Smartphone calendar; To-do-lists; N-back memory training; White noise

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moëll, B. (2013). Living SMART : an Internet course for adults with ADHD. (Thesis). Stockholm University. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-103088

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moëll, Birger. “Living SMART : an Internet course for adults with ADHD.” 2013. Thesis, Stockholm University. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-103088.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moëll, Birger. “Living SMART : an Internet course for adults with ADHD.” 2013. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Moëll B. Living SMART : an Internet course for adults with ADHD. [Internet] [Thesis]. Stockholm University; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-103088.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Moëll B. Living SMART : an Internet course for adults with ADHD. [Thesis]. Stockholm University; 2013. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-103088

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Florida

2. Kellen, Katherine J. Using Procedural Scaffolds, with and without Interactivity, to Support the Self-Regulation of Learning in Community College Online Composition Students.

Degree: EdD, Curriculum and Instruction - Teaching and Learning, 2015, University of Florida

This study addressed some of the challenges of supporting self-regulation of students for weekly tasks in community college online English composition; in a course that used a flexible learning design, a choice of procedural scaffolds was provided to support self-regulation of tasks by students. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the use of these procedural scaffolds, an instructor-designed, interactive checklists tool and a non-interactive calendar tool, and the core assignment submission and meta cognition of community college online English composition students. Measures included click stream data for procedural scaffold usage, a count of core assignment submissions, and Meta cognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) scores. Results indicated that use of the instructor-designed, interactive checklists tool better supported submission of core assignments by students than the non-interactive calendar tool. While MAI scores from students did increase across the study, no significant association with procedural scaffold use was found. Implications for future practice support the continued and extended use of interactive procedural scaffolds to support online students through task completion for complex processes such as writing. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: ANTONENKO,PAVLO (committee chair), OLIVER,EILEEN (committee member), SMITH-BONAHUE,TINA M (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: College students; Community colleges; High school students; Learning; Online learning; Scaffolds; Students; Teachers; Writing assignments; Writing processes; calendar  – checklists  – composition  – goals  – interactivity  – lms  – monitoring  – online  – scaffolding  – self-regulation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kellen, K. J. (2015). Using Procedural Scaffolds, with and without Interactivity, to Support the Self-Regulation of Learning in Community College Online Composition Students. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0049023

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kellen, Katherine J. “Using Procedural Scaffolds, with and without Interactivity, to Support the Self-Regulation of Learning in Community College Online Composition Students.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed July 15, 2020. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0049023.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kellen, Katherine J. “Using Procedural Scaffolds, with and without Interactivity, to Support the Self-Regulation of Learning in Community College Online Composition Students.” 2015. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Kellen KJ. Using Procedural Scaffolds, with and without Interactivity, to Support the Self-Regulation of Learning in Community College Online Composition Students. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0049023.

Council of Science Editors:

Kellen KJ. Using Procedural Scaffolds, with and without Interactivity, to Support the Self-Regulation of Learning in Community College Online Composition Students. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2015. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0049023

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