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You searched for subject:(Oceanic Mesoscale Eddies). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Liu, Xue. Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics.

Degree: PhD, Oceanography, 2018, Texas A&M University

As resolution of observations and climate models continues to improve, it has become increasingly evident that mesoscale eddies – a ubiquitous feature of the world ocean – can interact with the overlying atmosphere, potentially affecting large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and climate. Improving our understanding of this ocean mesoscale eddy – atmosphere (OME-A) interaction has important implications for improving climate simulations and predictions. This dissertation contributes to this understanding by focusing on two elements of OME-A interaction. The first element deals with the influence of ocean mesoscale eddies on rainfall. By comparing three different satellite-derived rainfall datasets, we examined the robustness of the rainfall response to ocean eddy induced mesoscale sea-surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs). The three datasets are the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Morphing Technique (CMORPH) global precipitation and newly available Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (IMERG) that is based on the latest remote sensing technology with finer spatial and temporal resolution. The results show that 1) all datasets exhibit a similar rainfall response to ocean eddies, but the amplitude of the rainfall response varies among datasets with IMERG producing the strongest and most coherent rainfall response, despite the weakest time-mean rainfall, 2) eddy-induced precipitation response is significantly stronger in winter than in summer and over warm eddies than cold eddies, and these asymmetries in rainfall response is more robust in IMERG than in the other two datasets. Documenting and analyzing these asymmetric rainfall responses are important for understanding the potential role of ocean eddies in forcing the large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate. The second element examines the effect of OME-A interaction on ocean eddy wind power that plays a vital role in dissipating eddy kinetic energy (EKE). By using a scaling analysis and analyzing eddy-resolving coupled climate model simulations, we not only quantify the impact of OME-A interaction on eddy wind power, but also provide a mechanistic understanding of the underlying process. Results show that the impact of OME-A feedback on eddy wind power, albeit smaller than that due to ocean current feedback, is significant and amounts to about 30-40% reduction of the value without OME-A interaction. Therefore, in the absence of OME-A interaction, eddy wind power is significantly overestimated, thus providing a too-strong sink for EKE. Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Ping (advisor), Lin, Xiaopei (advisor), Saravanan, Ramalingam (committee member), Szunyogh, Istvan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Oceanic Mesoscale Eddies; Air-Sea Interaction; Rainfall; Wind Power

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, X. (2018). Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173790

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Xue. “Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173790.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Xue. “Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Liu X. Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173790.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu X. Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173790


Texas A&M University

2. Liu, Xue. Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics.

Degree: PhD, Oceanography, 2018, Texas A&M University

As resolution of observations and climate models continues to improve, it has become increasingly evident that mesoscale eddies – a ubiquitous feature of the world ocean – can interact with the overlying atmosphere, potentially affecting large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and climate. Improving our understanding of this ocean mesoscale eddy – atmosphere (OME-A) interaction has important implications for improving climate simulations and predictions. This dissertation contributes to this understanding by focusing on two elements of OME-A interaction. The first element deals with the influence of ocean mesoscale eddies on rainfall. By comparing three different satellite-derived rainfall datasets, we examined the robustness of the rainfall response to ocean eddy induced mesoscale sea-surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs). The three datasets are the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Morphing Technique (CMORPH) global precipitation and newly available Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (IMERG) that is based on the latest remote sensing technology with finer spatial and temporal resolution. The results show that 1) all datasets exhibit a similar rainfall response to ocean eddies, but the amplitude of the rainfall response varies among datasets with IMERG producing the strongest and most coherent rainfall response, despite the weakest time-mean rainfall, 2) eddy-induced precipitation response is significantly stronger in winter than in summer and over warm eddies than cold eddies, and these asymmetries in rainfall response is more robust in IMERG than in the other two datasets. Documenting and analyzing these asymmetric rainfall responses are important for understanding the potential role of ocean eddies in forcing the large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate. The second element examines the effect of OME-A interaction on ocean eddy wind power that plays a vital role in dissipating eddy kinetic energy (EKE). By using a scaling analysis and analyzing eddy-resolving coupled climate model simulations, we not only quantify the impact of OME-A interaction on eddy wind power, but also provide a mechanistic understanding of the underlying process. Results show that the impact of OME-A feedback on eddy wind power, albeit smaller than that due to ocean current feedback, is significant and amounts to about 30-40% reduction of the value without OME-A interaction. Therefore, in the absence of OME-A interaction, eddy wind power is significantly overestimated, thus providing a too-strong sink for EKE. Advisors/Committee Members: Chang, Ping (advisor), Lin, Xiaopei (advisor), Saravanan, Ramalingam (committee member), Szunyogh, Istvan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Oceanic Mesoscale Eddies; Air-Sea Interaction; Rainfall; Wind Power

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, X. (2018). Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173883

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Xue. “Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173883.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Xue. “Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Liu X. Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173883.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu X. Elements of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy-Atmosphere Interactions in Extratropics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173883


University of Miami

3. Jaimes, Benjamin. On the Response to Tropical Cyclones in Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies.

Degree: PhD, Meteorology and Physical Oceanography (Marine), 2009, University of Miami

Tropical cyclones (TCs) often change intensity as they move over mesoscale oceanic features, as a function of the oceanic mixed layer (OML) thermal response (cooling) to the storm's wind stress. For example, observational evidence indicates that TCs in the Gulf of Mexico rapidly weaken over cyclonic cold core eddies (CCEs) where the cooling response is enhanced, and they rapidly intensify over anticyclonic warm features such as the Loop Current (LC) and Warm Core Eddies (WCEs) where OML cooling is reduced. Understanding this contrasting thermal response has important implications for oceanic feedback to TCs' intensity in forecasting models. Based on numerical experimentation and data acquired during hurricanes Katrina and Rita, this dissertation delineates the contrasting velocity and thermal response to TCs in mesoscale oceanic eddies. Observational evidence and model results indicate that, during the forced stage, the wind-driven horizontal current divergence under the storm's eye is affected by the underlying geostrophic circulation. Upwelling (downwelling) regimes develop when the wind stress vector is with (against) the geostrophic OML velocity vector. During the relaxation stage, background geostrophic circulations modulate vertical dispersion of OML near-inertial energy. The near-inertial velocity response is subsequently shifted toward more sub-inertial frequencies inside WCEs, where rapid vertical dispersion prevents accumulation of kinetic energy in the OML that reduces vertical shears and layer cooling. By contrast, near-inertial oscillations are vertically trapped in OMLs inside CCEs that increases vertical shears and entrainment. Estimates of downward vertical radiation of near-inertial wave energies were significantly stronger in the LC bulge (12.1X10 super -2 W m super -2) compared to that in CCEs (1.8X10 super -2 W m super -2). The rotational and translation properties of the geostrophic eddies have an important impact on the internal wave wake produced by TCs. More near-inertial kinetic energy is horizontally trapped in more rapidly rotating eddies. This response enhances vertical shear development and mixing. Moreover, the upper ocean temperature anomaly and near-inertial oscillations induced by TCs are transported by the westward-propagating geostrophic eddies. From a broader perspective, coupled models must capture oceanic features to reproduce the differentiated TC-induced OML cooling to improve intensity forecasting. Advisors/Committee Members: Lynn K. Shay, George H. Halliwell, William E. Johns, Kevin D. Leaman, Mark D. Powell.

Subjects/Keywords: Cold Core Eddy; Warm Core Eddy; Loop Current; Upwelling; Cold Wake; Oceanic Mixed Layer; Near-inertial Oscillations; Gulf Of Mexico; Air-sea Interaction; Tropical Cyclones; Hurricane Katrina; Hurricane Rita; Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jaimes, B. (2009). On the Response to Tropical Cyclones in Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Miami. Retrieved from https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/342

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jaimes, Benjamin. “On the Response to Tropical Cyclones in Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami. Accessed January 25, 2021. https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/342.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jaimes, Benjamin. “On the Response to Tropical Cyclones in Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies.” 2009. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Jaimes B. On the Response to Tropical Cyclones in Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Miami; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/342.

Council of Science Editors:

Jaimes B. On the Response to Tropical Cyclones in Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Miami; 2009. Available from: https://scholarlyrepository.miami.edu/oa_dissertations/342

.