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You searched for subject:(Nursing discourses). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Victoria

1. Schellenberg, Carolyn. The social organization of mothers' work: managing the risk and the responsibility for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

Degree: Program: Studies in Policy and Practice, 2012, University of Victoria

This institutional ethnography relies on observations, interviews, and textual analyses to explore the experiences of mothers and children who attend a women-centered agency in Vancouver, Canada where a hot lunch, child care in the emergency daycare, and participation in group activities are vital forms of support. Mothers who come to the centre have many concerns related to their need for safe housing, a sustainable income, adequate food, child care, and support. And like mothers anywhere, they have concerns about their children. While many of the children, the majority of them First Nations, have never had a diagnostic assessment for fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or for the relatively new umbrella category, ‘fetal alcohol spectrum disorder’ (FASD), a number of the mothers were concerned or even knew that their children had FAS. This thesis asks – how does it happen that mothers have come to know their children in this way? The study critically examines how FASD knowledge and practices actually work in the setting and what they accomplish. My analysis traces how ruling practices for constructing and managing ‘problem’ mothers and children coordinate work activities for identifying children deemed to be ‘at risk’ for FASD. In their efforts to help their children and improve their opportunities for a better life, mothers become willing participants in group activities where they learn how to attach the relevancies of the FASD discourse to their children’s bodies or behaviours. They also gain instruction which helps them to confess their responsibility for children’s problems. While maternal alcohol use as the cause of FASD is contested in literature and in some work sites it is, in this setting, taken as a fact. This study discovers how institutional work processes involving government, medicine, and education actually shape and re-write women’s and children’s experiences into forms of knowledge that make mothers and children institutionally actionable. It is only by exposing the relations of power organizing mothers’ work that it may be possible to re-direct attention to mothers’ and children’s embodied concerns and relieve mothers of the overwhelming responsibility for which they are held and hold themselves to be accountable. Advisors/Committee Members: Purkis, Mary Ellen (supervisor), Campbell, Marie L. (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: social organization of knowledge; institutional ethnography; nursing-critical inquiry; public health discourses and practices; fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD); fetal alcohol syndrome prevention; maternal child health; Aboriginal health; risk discourses and practices; policy - alcohol and drug

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schellenberg, C. (2012). The social organization of mothers' work: managing the risk and the responsibility for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4207

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schellenberg, Carolyn. “The social organization of mothers' work: managing the risk and the responsibility for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.” 2012. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed September 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4207.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schellenberg, Carolyn. “The social organization of mothers' work: managing the risk and the responsibility for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.” 2012. Web. 18 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Schellenberg C. The social organization of mothers' work: managing the risk and the responsibility for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4207.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schellenberg C. The social organization of mothers' work: managing the risk and the responsibility for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4207

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Michigan

2. Lee, Wen-Yu. Exploring professional knowledge and practices collaboratively in problem -based discussions: Online and face -to -face discourses in a nursing class.

Degree: PhD, Nursing, 2004, University of Michigan

This study contributes to two major areas of research into problem-based learning: (1) investigations of self-directed learning from a social perspective and (2) examinations of the effects of different modes of communication imbedded in PBL. Content analysis and discourse analysis were applied to two different implementations of PBL in a graduate nursing course: online treaded discussions using problems at the level of principles and face-to-face discussions using real patient cases. Primary data included 751 online messages and eight sessions of face-to-face discussions. The first part of the study investigated the interplay between self-directed learning and group interactions by focusing on the formation of learning topics and the collaborative use of learning resources. Results indicated that the content posted by peers provided a fruitful foundation for the formation of learning topics and subsequent discussions pursued by students. Also, throughout these discussions, students broadened their conceptual knowledge and incorporated academic publications in reference to professional and personal experiences. The discussions produced iterative interrelated processes of knowledge building and information searching. The second part of the study investigated common and unique discursive interactions in the two PBL settings online and face-to-face. While both settings supported authentic learning and students' initiatives for learning, each offered distinct learning opportunities. Online discussions provided more support for crafting multiple perspectives, presenting multiple resources, and reflecting on multiple approaches for the same problem. The real-time, immediate responses to the problem, nevertheless, assisted with inspection of misunderstandings displayed during the discussions. Students were directly involved in each other's inquiry and clinical reasoning processes for decision making. This study argues that the reciprocal relationship between self-directed learning and group interaction in online discussions supports the exploration of a wide range of related issues and connections between information from various resources. Therefore, educators should take advantage of online discussions to encourage the investigation of ethical dilemmas, controversial and debatable topics, or diverse theoretical perspectives. Yet, online discourses were not sufficient for understanding nursing practices. Students relied on each other's immediate feedback to monitor and critique clinical reasoning. Thus, having students discuss fully contextualized cases face-to-face helps students apply knowledge to realistic situations. Advisors/Committee Members: Berger, Carl F. (advisor), Rex, Lesley Ann (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Class; Collaboration; Collaboratively; Discourses; Exploring; Face-to-face; Nursing Education; Online; Practices; Problem-based Discussions; Professional Knowledge

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, W. (2004). Exploring professional knowledge and practices collaboratively in problem -based discussions: Online and face -to -face discourses in a nursing class. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124480

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Wen-Yu. “Exploring professional knowledge and practices collaboratively in problem -based discussions: Online and face -to -face discourses in a nursing class.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed September 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124480.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Wen-Yu. “Exploring professional knowledge and practices collaboratively in problem -based discussions: Online and face -to -face discourses in a nursing class.” 2004. Web. 18 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lee W. Exploring professional knowledge and practices collaboratively in problem -based discussions: Online and face -to -face discourses in a nursing class. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2004. [cited 2020 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124480.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee W. Exploring professional knowledge and practices collaboratively in problem -based discussions: Online and face -to -face discourses in a nursing class. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/124480


Victoria University of Wellington

3. King, Suzanne Lavinia Jane. "Getting on Top of Pain": a Critical Analysis of Surgical Nurses' Talk About Their Work with Hospitalised Patients Reporting Pain.

Degree: 1999, Victoria University of Wellington

This thesis investigates the relationship between language, 'discourse' and professional knowledge and power in a specific context; that of surgical nurses' "talk" about their work managing pain in hospitalised patients. This thesis argues that the work of 'caring for' hospitalised surgical patients who report pain is influenced by discourses which are predicated on different readings/understandings of the body/patient, and from which different knowledge is constructed. Of interest to this thesis are the discourses of biomedicine and nursing, and their role in constructing a particular reality/ies which determine the ways in which surgical nurses talk about their work managing pain. Using the method of critical discourse analysis, the "texts" of transcribed audio-taped conversations with four registered nurses working in surgical specialties were analysed to uncover 'discourses of pain management'. The results of the analysis indicate that the biomedical construction of pain, and approaches to pain management, remain the dominant influence over surgical nurses' practice. There was evidence of nursing discourses with an emphasis on nurse-patient relationships also playing a role. These discourses were critically examined for what they reveal about relations of professional knowledge and power in this specific context of the nurses' practice. The implications for nursing and nursing research are considered significant because the study critically (re)presents a different perspective on, and reality for surgical nurses' pain management practices. In so doing, it elucidates an explanation for, and understanding of, why surgical nurses take care of patients reporting pain in particular ways. Advisors/Committee Members: Bickley, Joy.

Subjects/Keywords: Terminology; Social impact; Professional practice; Pain expression; Nursing discourses; Reflective practice; Critical discourse analysis; Discourse analysis; Audio-taped conversations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

King, S. L. J. (1999). "Getting on Top of Pain": a Critical Analysis of Surgical Nurses' Talk About Their Work with Hospitalised Patients Reporting Pain. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/100

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

King, Suzanne Lavinia Jane. “"Getting on Top of Pain": a Critical Analysis of Surgical Nurses' Talk About Their Work with Hospitalised Patients Reporting Pain.” 1999. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed September 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/100.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

King, Suzanne Lavinia Jane. “"Getting on Top of Pain": a Critical Analysis of Surgical Nurses' Talk About Their Work with Hospitalised Patients Reporting Pain.” 1999. Web. 18 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

King SLJ. "Getting on Top of Pain": a Critical Analysis of Surgical Nurses' Talk About Their Work with Hospitalised Patients Reporting Pain. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 1999. [cited 2020 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/100.

Council of Science Editors:

King SLJ. "Getting on Top of Pain": a Critical Analysis of Surgical Nurses' Talk About Their Work with Hospitalised Patients Reporting Pain. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 1999. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/100

.