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You searched for subject:(Nurse led service). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Whiteford, Caroline Louise. A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints.

Degree: 2015, University of Adelaide

Background: Ear, nose and throat complaints are very common and can cause disruption to patients’ lives. Many conditions are of a chronic nature and are not currently managed in a timely manner by general practitioners in the community. This may be due to a lack of specialised knowledge, necessary diagnostic equipment, or a lack of time for lengthy patient education about management of their condition. A nurse-led model of care may be an effective alternative. Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. Inclusion Criteria: Participants: Adult patients, aged 18 and older, attending ear, nose and throat clinics, regardless of complaint. Interventions: Nurse–led care in general practice and acute care in which the nurse was identified as taking a lead role in the care of the patients with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. Comparator: General practitioner-led care, or ear, nose and throat consultant- led care, sometimes described as “standard care”. Outcomes: Service delivery outcomes- specifically patient satisfaction, waiting times, patient education booking queues, clinical and health outcomes, specifically, treatment times, treatment duration, course of treatment, self-treatment rates, change in presentation to clinic episodes, re-infection rates, prevention and cure, representation of patients to clinic for same complaint, levels of pain and discomfort and financial outcomes, specifically differences in costing, nurse–led clinic versus medical–led clinic. Studies: Any relevant quantitative studies published in English between 1980-2013 were considered. Search Strategy: A standardised three-step search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. Databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), Scopus, Embase, MedNar and ProQuest Theses and Dissertations. Methodological quality: Assessed by two reviewers prior to inclusion in the review using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data Synthesis: Due to the methodological heterogeneity of the included studies, no statistical pooling was possible and all results are presented narratively. Results: The search identified 13,536 titles, of which 20 potentially relevant articles were retrieved. Of these 20, 17 were excluded following full-text review leaving three studies that were assessed for methodological quality and included in the review. Service delivery outcomes: Patient satisfaction was equal or higher and waiting times were shorter in nurse led clinics. Clinical and health outcomes: Lower pain/discomfort levels were demonstrated in nurse led clinics but other clinical/health outcomes were not addressed. Financial outcomes: Nurse-led clinics were cost effective when compared with medical-led clinics. Conclusions: While all studies reported evidence of effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints, most of the… Advisors/Committee Members: White, Sarahlouise (advisor), Stephenson, Matthew (advisor), School of Translational Health Science (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Nurse; nurse-led; clinics; clinical; outcomes; service

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Whiteford, C. L. (2015). A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107714

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Whiteford, Caroline Louise. “A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints.” 2015. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107714.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Whiteford, Caroline Louise. “A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints.” 2015. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Whiteford CL. A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107714.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Whiteford CL. A systematic review of the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107714

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Janssen, Josephine Mary Elizabeth. Meeting the Needs of Maori with Diabetes: an Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Service.

Degree: 2008, Victoria University of Wellington

Designated Maori health service providers and specialised Maori nursing roles using "culturally appropriate" practices have been developed in New Zealand to address health disparities between Maori and non-Maori citizens. This study considers the effectiveness, from several perspectives, of a Maori nurse-led diabetes programme offered by Te Hauora O Ngati Rarua. It also identifies salient features of the experience of having diabetes and being on the programme, which consists of the combination of a six week course of group education sessions with one-to-one case management, involving health care, education and support. Programme evaluation was conducted using an embedded case study design. Seven programme participants were followed for 9-12 months, during which time multiple sources of data were accessed, including programme documents, clinical notes, laboratory results and stakeholder interviews. Client outcomes were measured in terms of physiological measures, knowledge acquisition, diabetes management and lifestyle behaviour. Some participants demonstrated improved diabetes management and lifestyle behaviour while actively engaged with the programme, but efforts tended to lapse once support was reduced. This highlighted the importance of optimising the level of long-term self-management support for clients with diabetes. High levels of co-morbidity were common and tended to complicate management. The Transtheoretical Model of Change, Chronic Care Model and Systems Theory shaped the evaluation. The study makes four important contributions to knowledge in this area: 1) it confirms the importance of Maori values and processes in "by Maori for Maori" services as they help to keep clients engaged, 2) it describes how small Maori health providers meet the needs of the local community, and 3) it identifies the value of the Maori Diabetes Nurse Educator (MDNE) role in primary health care. Thus it serves as an affirmation of the importance of the Maori Health Strategy and Maori self-determination in organising and delivering health care for Maori clients. The fourth valuable contribution is the insight gained into the dynamics of Pakeha researchers working in partnership with Maori organisations. Advisors/Committee Members: Nelson, Katherine, McEldowney, Rose.

Subjects/Keywords: Maori health; Diabetes; Nurse-led service

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Janssen, J. M. E. (2008). Meeting the Needs of Maori with Diabetes: an Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Service. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/884

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Janssen, Josephine Mary Elizabeth. “Meeting the Needs of Maori with Diabetes: an Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Service.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed September 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/884.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Janssen, Josephine Mary Elizabeth. “Meeting the Needs of Maori with Diabetes: an Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Service.” 2008. Web. 19 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Janssen JME. Meeting the Needs of Maori with Diabetes: an Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Service. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/884.

Council of Science Editors:

Janssen JME. Meeting the Needs of Maori with Diabetes: an Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Service. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/884

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