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You searched for subject:(Nonlinear income tax). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Dai, Darong. Essays in Nonlinear Labor Income Taxation with Tax-Driven Migrations.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2018, Texas A&M University

This dissertation includes two essays in nonlinear labor income taxation with tax-driven migrations. In the first essay, we study optimal nonlinear income taxation in an open economy with migration possibilities and social comparisons. Recent evidence suggests that globalization has not just reduced the barriers to international labor mobility but also induced more cross-country comparisons. In an open economy with tax-driven migrations and consumption externalities motivated by altruism or jealousy, we derive an optimal tax formula that subsumes existing ones obtained under maximin social objective and additively separable utility, and identify the sign of second-best marginal tax rates for all skill levels. We establish thresholds of the elasticity and level of migration to determine when relativity and inequality are complementary (or substitutive) in shaping the optimal top tax rates. These thresholds are in general different between altruism-type and jealousy-type relativity. Surprisingly, there exist reasonable combinations of relativity, mobility and inequality such that tax competition results in higher equilibrium top tax rates than proposed in autarky. Also, under both Nash and Stackelberg tax competition, we have the following numerical finding by plugging realistic parameter values in our tax formula. If the migration probability of top-income workers is around 50%, then the country facing labor inflow (respectively, outflow) of these types of workers implements around 10% lower (respectively, higher) top tax rates than suggested by the autarky equilibrium which does not allow for migration possibilities. In the second essay, we study majority voting over selfishly optimal nonlinear income tax schedules proposed by a continuum of workers who can migrate between two competing jurisdictions at the expense of some migration cost. Both skill and migration cost are the private information of each worker. Assuming quasilinear-in-consumption preferences, the tax schedule proposed by the median skill type is the Condorcet winner that redistributes incomes from the rich and poor toward the middle. While it features negative marginal tax rates for low skills, it features positive marginal tax rates for high skills who have elasticities of migration smaller than a threshold. In a comparison with the autarky economy, we establish the skill-dependent threshold of migration elasticity for all types of workers. If their migration elasticities are higher than their respective threshold, then migrations induce lower marginal tax rates than does autarky; otherwise migrations induce higher marginal tax rates for the jurisdiction facing net labor inflow in low skills while net labor outflow in high skills. Counterfactual simulations using empirical parameter estimates show that eliminating migrations in the U.S. would generate top tax rates over 20% higher than the 42.5% that was actually implemented. Advisors/Committee Members: Tian, Guoqiang (advisor), Jansen, Dennis W. (committee member), Zhang, Yuzhe (committee member), Li, Quan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Relative consumption; Income inequality; Maximin; Optimal income taxation; Tax competition; Migration; Redistributive taxation; Nonlinear income tax; Majority voting; Median voter

…Selfishly Optimal Nonlinear Income Tax Schedules… …other Pigouvian tax. We focus on the tool of labor income tax and design optimal nonlinear tax… …approach and study majority voting over selfishly optimal nonlinear income tax schedules proposed… …reality.4 In this paper we focus on the tool of labor income tax and design optimal nonlinear… …relativity and inequality determines the optimal nonlinear income tax schedule and meanwhile how… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dai, D. (2018). Essays in Nonlinear Labor Income Taxation with Tax-Driven Migrations. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173527

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dai, Darong. “Essays in Nonlinear Labor Income Taxation with Tax-Driven Migrations.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173527.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dai, Darong. “Essays in Nonlinear Labor Income Taxation with Tax-Driven Migrations.” 2018. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Dai D. Essays in Nonlinear Labor Income Taxation with Tax-Driven Migrations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173527.

Council of Science Editors:

Dai D. Essays in Nonlinear Labor Income Taxation with Tax-Driven Migrations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173527

2. Lopez Daneri, Martin Eduardo. Essays on income taxation and idiosyncratic risk.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2012, University of Iowa

I study the role of heterogeneity and idiosyncratic risk in Macroeconomics, and their implications on problems of income taxation. In the first chapter, I study the effects of redistributive taxation in an incomplete market economy with heterogeneous agents and idiosyncratic risk. I focus on the role of distortions in labor supply decisions and the interplay of heterogeneity and uninsurable idiosyncratic shocks, conducting the first general equilibrium analysis of a Negative Income Tax (NIT). I show that a NIT is a serious candidate to replace the current income tax in the United States. I find that the optimal NIT has a marginal tax rate of 28% and a transfer of 10% of per capita GDP, roughly $4600. The welfare gains of replacing the current US income tax with a NIT are equivalent to a 6.3% increase in annual consumption in every state of the world. Low-ability agents, in the bottom quintile of the productivity distribution, benefit the most, while high-ability agents are worse off. A consequence of the reform is that the composition of the labor force changes, with high-productivity agents working more, in relative terms, than low-productivity agents. Finally, I find that the riskier the economy, the higher the welfare gains of the NIT as a provider of public insurance. In the second chapter, I study labor income dynamics over the life cycle and introduce a novel methodology that can detect the presence of patterns in the idiosyncratic earnings shocks and recognize economic forces in action. Using a sample from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), I estimate a Bayesian Logistic Smoothed Transition Autoregressive model of order 1 (LSTAR(1)) with a rich level of heterogeneity in the innovations. I find that there is a life-cycle pattern in the earning shocks: before the age 29, young workers experience shocks with higher variance and a positive probability of lower persistence than older workers. A comparison with conventional models shows that an incorrect model specification introduces bias in the estimates. The proposed model can be easily approximated with a discrete Markov process. This means that this model can be used by macroeconomists to calibrate income processes. Advisors/Committee Members: Ventura, Gustavo (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Distribution; Efficiency; Income Processes; Income Tax; Negative Income Tax; Nonlinear Time-Series Models; Economics

…of a Negative Income Tax (NIT). I show that a NIT is a serious candidate to… …replace the current income tax in the United States. I find that the optimal NIT has a marginal… …replacing the current US income tax with a NIT are equivalent to a 6.3% increase in annual… …CHAPTER 1 THE MACROECONOMIC EFFECTS OF A NEGATIVE INCOME TAX… …90 xii 1 CHAPTER 1 THE MACROECONOMIC EFFECTS OF A NEGATIVE INCOME TAX 1.1 Introduction… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lopez Daneri, M. E. (2012). Essays on income taxation and idiosyncratic risk. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Iowa. Retrieved from https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/3342

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lopez Daneri, Martin Eduardo. “Essays on income taxation and idiosyncratic risk.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Iowa. Accessed September 20, 2020. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/3342.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lopez Daneri, Martin Eduardo. “Essays on income taxation and idiosyncratic risk.” 2012. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lopez Daneri ME. Essays on income taxation and idiosyncratic risk. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/3342.

Council of Science Editors:

Lopez Daneri ME. Essays on income taxation and idiosyncratic risk. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Iowa; 2012. Available from: https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/3342

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