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You searched for subject:(Non invasive endocrinology). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Queensland

1. Swinbourne, Alyce Maree. The use of urine as a tool to analyse the reproductive function of captive female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

Degree: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, 2018, University of Queensland

Subjects/Keywords: Marsupial; Lasiorhinus; Wombat; Reproduction; Behaviour; Endocrinology; Physiology; Captivity; Urine; Non-invasive; Olfaction; 0606 Physiology; 0608 Zoology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Swinbourne, A. M. (2018). The use of urine as a tool to analyse the reproductive function of captive female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons). (Thesis). University of Queensland. Retrieved from http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:723842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swinbourne, Alyce Maree. “The use of urine as a tool to analyse the reproductive function of captive female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).” 2018. Thesis, University of Queensland. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:723842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swinbourne, Alyce Maree. “The use of urine as a tool to analyse the reproductive function of captive female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).” 2018. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Swinbourne AM. The use of urine as a tool to analyse the reproductive function of captive female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons). [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:723842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Swinbourne AM. The use of urine as a tool to analyse the reproductive function of captive female southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons). [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2018. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:723842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Oxford

2. Sugianto, Nadine Adrianna. Reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) : endocrinological insights into lifetime reproductive events, strategies and cub development in response to ecological factors.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Oxford

Knowledge of reproductive adaptions and physiological mechanisms are essential in wildlife conservation as they impact species survival. As markers of bodily functions, hormones mirror reproductive activity and reveal baseline information including reproductive cycles and strategies, lifetime reproductive events such as puberty and senescence, as well as responses to ecological factors, which are all profound factors of wildlife population growth. In this thesis, the reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) is examined by utilising endocrinological measures with complementary somatic and ecological data. <b>Research chapter I</b> establishes endocinological mechanisms of the flexible delayed implantation and superfoetation mating strategy, where number of additional mating seasons varies with population density across badger geographical range. <b>Research chapter II</b> demonstrates that despite hormone levels and external genitalia morphology (EGM) showing similar seasonal patterns, EGM in males is a reliable indicator of reproductive status only during the mating season, while in females EGM is a less precise proxy. <b>Research chapter III</b> reveals that asynchronous timing in attaining minimum body size, required for sexual maturity, results in two heterochronous phenotypes (early- and late- developers) in male cubs (less evident in females), while <b>Research chapter IV</b> showcases the decline in sex-steroid levels and somatic condition with age, leading to a post-reproductive lifespan (PRLS), while also showing two reproductive phenotypes (high and low hormone levels) in older individuals of both sexes. <b>Research chapter V</b> demonstrates that sexual selection is unlikely to be the driving force for sexual size dimorphism in badgers, but social and environmental factors, as well as endocrinological mechanisms, affecting juvenile diverging growth patterns and end body sizes are likely the primary physiological process of this phenomenon. <b>Research chapter VI</b> illustrates that ecological changes can be reflected in hormone levels and the regulation of these changes differs between sexes, likely linked to their respective reproductive strategies. <b>Research chapter VII</b> establishes that urinary metabolite measurement may reliably assess endocrine function in badgers as a non-invasive technique, especially in males. Collectively, these research chapters give a comprehensive understanding of the badger's reproductive processes and how it interacts with ecological factors.

Subjects/Keywords: Development; Senescence; European Badger; Puberty; Reproductive Strategies; Non-invasive Hormone Monitoring; Endocrinology; Reproductive biology; Animal Welfare; Ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sugianto, N. A. (2018). Reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) : endocrinological insights into lifetime reproductive events, strategies and cub development in response to ecological factors. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oxford. Retrieved from http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:8ca1b7fb-442a-4522-bbd0-744612814816 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.791597

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sugianto, Nadine Adrianna. “Reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) : endocrinological insights into lifetime reproductive events, strategies and cub development in response to ecological factors.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oxford. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:8ca1b7fb-442a-4522-bbd0-744612814816 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.791597.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sugianto, Nadine Adrianna. “Reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) : endocrinological insights into lifetime reproductive events, strategies and cub development in response to ecological factors.” 2018. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Sugianto NA. Reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) : endocrinological insights into lifetime reproductive events, strategies and cub development in response to ecological factors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oxford; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:8ca1b7fb-442a-4522-bbd0-744612814816 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.791597.

Council of Science Editors:

Sugianto NA. Reproductive biology of the European badger (Meles meles) : endocrinological insights into lifetime reproductive events, strategies and cub development in response to ecological factors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oxford; 2018. Available from: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:8ca1b7fb-442a-4522-bbd0-744612814816 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.791597


University of Illinois – Chicago

3. Czupryna, Anna M. The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

Free-roaming dogs, Canis lupus familiaris, can be both a public health and conservation concern. Between 2010 and 2013 we identified 2,649 dogs in four rural villages in Tanzania. We characterized dog demography and ownership practices and investigated whether vaccination influences dog population dynamics. We found that adult dogs had higher survival than puppies in all villages. We observed a male-biased sex ratio across all age classes and higher adult male dog survival. Within the vaccination villages, vaccinated dogs had a decreased risk of death. However, overall mortality in one non-vaccination village was significantly higher than in the two vaccination villages and other non-vaccination village. Dogs in poor body condition had lower survival than dogs in ideal body condition in all villages. Sickness and spotted hyena, Crocuta crocuta, predation were the two main causes of dog death. Reproductive patterns were similar between vaccination and non-vaccination villages and we observed an overall male-biased litter sex ratio regardless of the mother’s body condition. Dogs were owned and used primarily for livestock and household protection. We found that dog ownership was related to livestock ownership, household size, education, and house type. Thus, the number of dogs increases with household wealth. Stable isotope analyses of dog hair confirmed survey data and indicated that dogs were fed primarily a corn-based diet similar to human diet in the villages.Free-roaming domestic dogs in rural communities exist in the context of their human owners as well as the surrounding wildlife. Our results demonstrate that vaccination alone does not impact domestic dog population dynamics and that they may be mediated by humans. Understanding the role of dogs and their care within these communities is important for planning and implement rabies control measures such as mass dog vaccination. Advisors/Committee Members: Brown, Joel S (advisor), Faust, Lisa J (advisor), Santymire, Rachel M (committee member), Mehta, Supriya D (committee member), Whelan, Christopher J (committee member), Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel (committee member), Brown, Joel S (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Demography; Domestic dog; Free-roaming dog; Non-invasive endocrinology; Rabies; Stable isotopes; Survival analysis; Tanzania

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Czupryna, A. M. (2017). The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Czupryna, Anna M. “The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Czupryna, Anna M. “The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.” 2017. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Czupryna AM. The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Czupryna AM. The Ecology of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21898

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.