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You searched for subject:(Noah Purifoy). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Lipschutz, Yael R. Noah Purifoy: through the fire.

Degree: PhD, Art History, 2013, University of Southern California

This dissertation examines and contextualizes the work of Noah Purifoy. Born in Snow Hill, Alabama in 1917, Noah Purifoy lived and worked most of his life in Los Angeles and Joshua Tree, California, where he died in 2004. He received an undergraduate degree from Alabama State Teachers College in 1943 and a graduate degree from Atlanta University in 1948. In 1956, just shy of his fortieth birthday, Purifoy received a BFA from Chouinard, now known as CalArts. A founding director of the Watts Towers Art Center, his earliest body of sculpture, constructed out of charred debris from the 1965 Watts Rebellion, was the basis for 66 Signs of Neon (1966), a landmark group exhibition on the riots, which traveled throughout the country. In line with the postwar period's general fascination with the street and its objects, Purifoy's 66 Signs of Neon constituted a Duchampian approach to the fire-molded alleys of Watts, a strategy that profoundly impacted artists then emerging in Los Angeles and beyond, such as David Hammons, John Outterbridge, and Senga Nengudi, who all worked with him. For the twenty years that followed the rebellion, Purifoy dedicated himself to the found object, and to using art as a tool for social change. ❧ In the late 1980's, Purifoy moved his practice out to the Mojave desert, where he lived for the last fifteen years of his life, creating ten-acres full of large-scale sculpture on the desert floor. Constructed entirely from junked materials, this otherworldly environment displays an artistic scope so diverse as to represent a veritable template for much of the art world's sculptural production of the last two decades. Noah Purifoy: Through the Fire explores a pivotal, though under-recognized, figure in the development of postwar American art whose effect is only beginning to be fully understood, investigating every aspect of his career, from his early experiences as a designer in Los Angeles's flourishing midcentury design movement to his public policy work for the California Arts Council, through to his tenure in the Mojave desert. Advisors/Committee Members: Cooks, Bridget R.Kelley, Robin D.G. (Committee Chair), Hudson, Suzanne P. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Noah Purifoy; assemblage art

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lipschutz, Y. R. (2013). Noah Purifoy: through the fire. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/332999/rec/4422

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lipschutz, Yael R. “Noah Purifoy: through the fire.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed February 17, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/332999/rec/4422.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lipschutz, Yael R. “Noah Purifoy: through the fire.” 2013. Web. 17 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Lipschutz YR. Noah Purifoy: through the fire. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. [cited 2020 Feb 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/332999/rec/4422.

Council of Science Editors:

Lipschutz YR. Noah Purifoy: through the fire. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2013. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/332999/rec/4422


University of Southern California

2. Danjuma, Sharon Elizabeth. Community engaged art: no longer a form of resistance?.

Degree: Master of Public Art Studies, Public Art Studies, 2010, University of Southern California

During the 1960s and 1970s, African American artists created site-specific community engaged projects that were narrations of the social-cultural context of their communities. Within this milieu, the art works became powerful communicative tools, as was the case in John Outterbridge's collaborative project Oh, Speak Speak and Noah Purifoy's 66 Signs of Neon. However, in recent years, a proliferation of community engaged site-specific arts have emerged in various forms. These projects are appearing in the discourse of mainstream texts, discussions, museum exhibitions and commissioned public art works in the urban environment. Once looked upon with little regard by the art world, community engaged art is now canonized in the academy and elite art circles by a professional class of critics, curators, art historians and urban planners. This co-optation and assimilation of the aesthetic has weakened the criticality of the practice creating a disembodied commodification and a form of social work. Advisors/Committee Members: Ulke, Christina (Committee Chair), Outterbridge, John (Committee Member), Decter, Joshua (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: community art; John Outterbridge; Noah Purifoy; Oh, speak speak; 66 signs of neon; Watts rebellion; Elliott Pinkney

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Danjuma, S. E. (2010). Community engaged art: no longer a form of resistance?. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309984/rec/1479

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Danjuma, Sharon Elizabeth. “Community engaged art: no longer a form of resistance?.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed February 17, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309984/rec/1479.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Danjuma, Sharon Elizabeth. “Community engaged art: no longer a form of resistance?.” 2010. Web. 17 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Danjuma SE. Community engaged art: no longer a form of resistance?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2010. [cited 2020 Feb 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309984/rec/1479.

Council of Science Editors:

Danjuma SE. Community engaged art: no longer a form of resistance?. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2010. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/309984/rec/1479

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