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You searched for subject:(Nanostructured Lipid Carrier). One record found.

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Texas Tech University

1. Sun, Ming. Anticancer activities of nanoencapsulated Quercetin in breast cancer cells.

Degree: MS, Nutritional Sciences, 2012, Texas Tech University

Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Quercetin, a natural flavonoid abundantly present in grapes, red wine, onion, broccoli and other leafy green vegetables, is known to possess potent anti-proliferative effects against various malignant cells, but the low level of water solubility and bioavailability in the body makes administering it in therapeutic doses unrealistic. Therefore, the development of appropriate flavonoid nanocarriers could be of great importance to enhance its solubility and cellular bioavailability. We have successfully synthesized quercetin encapsulated nanostructured lipid carrier (Q-NLC). Our hypothesis is that Q-NLC can enhance quercetin stability, solubility and cellular bioavailability, decrease the viability of breast cancer cells, and induce their apoptosis. This research project can help to develop a novel preventive and therapeutic modality for breast cancer. Methods: The stability, solubility and cellular bioavailability of quercetin in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were measured using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Cell viability and apoptosis in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were measured using a 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Annexin-V/PI (propidium iodide) to detect phosphatidylserine exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells, respectively. Results: Nanoencapsulation significantly increased the stability, solubility, and cellular uptake of quercetin. Q-NLC significantly lowered the proliferation of both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and induced their apoptosis compared to free quercetin. Cell proliferation decreased significantly in a time- (24h and 48h) and dose-dependent (1 μM to 50 μM) manner. Conclusion: Q-NLC is a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Advisors/Committee Members: Boylan, Mallory (committee member), Zhang, Ruiwen (committee member), Wang, Shu (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Nanostructured Lipid Carrier; Quercetin; Nanoparticle; Breast Cancer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sun, M. (2012). Anticancer activities of nanoencapsulated Quercetin in breast cancer cells. (Masters Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/73883

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Ming. “Anticancer activities of nanoencapsulated Quercetin in breast cancer cells.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed October 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/73883.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Ming. “Anticancer activities of nanoencapsulated Quercetin in breast cancer cells.” 2012. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Sun M. Anticancer activities of nanoencapsulated Quercetin in breast cancer cells. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/73883.

Council of Science Editors:

Sun M. Anticancer activities of nanoencapsulated Quercetin in breast cancer cells. [Masters Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/73883

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