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1. Faralli, Hervé. Tshz3 un marqueur des cellules satellites : une étude de sa fonction dans la régulation de la myogenèse chez la souris : Tshz3 a marker of Satellite cells : study of his role in the regulation of mouse myogenesis.

Degree: Docteur es, Biologie des eucaryotes, 2010, Aix-Marseille 2

L’unité cellulaire du muscle squelettique est la myofibre, un syncytium hautement spécialisé générant la contraction musculaire. Au cours de la croissance et de la régénération musculaire, les cellules satellites quiescentes (cellules souches) du muscle squelettique adulte sont activées, prolifèrent puis fusionnent formant de nouvelles fibres. A l’aide d’un modèle murin de régénération et de cultures primaires, j’ai identifié TSHZ3 comme un nouveau marqueur des cellules satellites quiescentes et activées. Dans la lignée cellulaire C2C12, j’ai mis en évidence un effet répresseur spécifique de Tshz3 sur la différenciation myogénique. L’entrée des myoblastes dans la voie de différenciation terminale est déclenchée par le facteur Myogenin (MYOG). L’activation de la transcription du gène myogenin (Myog) est dépendante du facteur MYOD et fait intervenir le complexe de remodelage de la chromatine SWI/SNF. In vitro, TSHZ3 interagit avec BAF57 une sous unité du complexe SWI/SNF. TSHZ3 réprime l’activation dépendante de MYOD sur le promoteur proximal de Myog et cette répression dépend en partie de la présence de BAF57. L’activité répressive et la cinétique d’expression de Tshz3, indique que TSHZ3 pourrait empêcher l’activation prématurée du promoteur Myog lors de la prolifération des cellules satellites activées. TSHZ3 pourrait ainsi participer aux mécanismes de régulation permettant de contrôler l’équilibre entre prolifération, différenciation et renouvellement des progéniteurs myogéniques.

Skeletal muscles are made of several units called myofibers, a syncitium into which muscular contraction is generated. During the muscle growth and repair, the quiescent Satellite Cells (SCs; adult stem cells) become activated, proliferate and differentiate to form new multinucleated myofibers. In animal model and primary culture, I found that, Tshz3 was strongly expressed in the quiescent and activated satellite cells.In C2C12 myoblast cells, I showed a specific repressive effect of TSHZ3 on the myogenic differentiation. The terminal differentiation of the myoblastes is trigger by Myogenin (Myog). The transcriptional activation of Myog promoter involves MYOD and the SWI/SNF remodelling complex. In vitro, I showed that TSHZ3 interacts with BAF57, a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex. TSHZ3 represses the MYOD-dependant activation on the Myog promoter. This specific repression involves in part BAF57.The repressive activity of and the temporal dynamic of expression of Tshz3, indicated that TSHZ3 potentially is required to impede the premature activation of the Myog promotor during the SCs proliferation. These results suggest that TSHZ3 plays important roles in the molecular mechanisms operating in activated SCs when there are poised between proliferation, differentiation and self renewal of muscular progenitors.

Advisors/Committee Members: Fasano, Laurent (thesis director), Caubit, Xavier (thesis director).

Subjects/Keywords: Muscle squelettique; Cellules satellites; Développement; Régénération; Tshz3; MyoD; Myog; Baf57; Swi/snf

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APA (6th Edition):

Faralli, H. (2010). Tshz3 un marqueur des cellules satellites : une étude de sa fonction dans la régulation de la myogenèse chez la souris : Tshz3 a marker of Satellite cells : study of his role in the regulation of mouse myogenesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Aix-Marseille 2. Retrieved from http://www.theses.fr/2010AIX22045

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Faralli, Hervé. “Tshz3 un marqueur des cellules satellites : une étude de sa fonction dans la régulation de la myogenèse chez la souris : Tshz3 a marker of Satellite cells : study of his role in the regulation of mouse myogenesis.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Aix-Marseille 2. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://www.theses.fr/2010AIX22045.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Faralli, Hervé. “Tshz3 un marqueur des cellules satellites : une étude de sa fonction dans la régulation de la myogenèse chez la souris : Tshz3 a marker of Satellite cells : study of his role in the regulation of mouse myogenesis.” 2010. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Faralli H. Tshz3 un marqueur des cellules satellites : une étude de sa fonction dans la régulation de la myogenèse chez la souris : Tshz3 a marker of Satellite cells : study of his role in the regulation of mouse myogenesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Aix-Marseille 2; 2010. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2010AIX22045.

Council of Science Editors:

Faralli H. Tshz3 un marqueur des cellules satellites : une étude de sa fonction dans la régulation de la myogenèse chez la souris : Tshz3 a marker of Satellite cells : study of his role in the regulation of mouse myogenesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Aix-Marseille 2; 2010. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2010AIX22045


Lincoln University

2. Kunhareang, Sajee. Genes that affect meat production, fat deposition and carcass weight in pigs.

Degree: 2014, Lincoln University

Muscle growth is a critical trait in the pig industry, as increased muscle growth results in increased meat yield. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate genes that may be involved in muscle growth and carcass traits in pigs. A total of 474 commercial pigs from New Zealand and Thailand were investigated using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis to explore variation in nine candidate genes. These genes included: the myogenic regulatory factor 5 gene (MYF5), the myogenin gene (MYOG), the calpastatin gene (CAST), the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3), the myostatin gene (MSTN), the callipyge gene (CLPG), the leptin gene (LEP), the beta-3 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB3) and the immunoglobulin heavy alpha chain gene (IGHA). These genes have been reported to influence muscle growth rate, meat production and other production traits in animals. Sequence analyses revealed genetic variation at all the loci tested, with the exception of MSTN, which was not variable in the region tested in the pigs studied. There were two variants of MYOG, CAPN3, CLPG and ADRB3, and three variants of LEP and IGHA, including a new variant, that has not been reported previously. The highest level of variation detected was four variants of MYF5 and CAST. The variation in each gene was tested for its association with production traits in the pigs studied. The presence of variant A of MYF5 exon 3 was associated with increased weaning- weight and decreased fat depth. Variant C of CAST intron 5 was associated with increased live weight, average daily gain (ADG) and lean growth rate. Variant D of CAST intron 5 was associated with increased ADG and increased fat depth, while variant B of CAST exon 6 tended (P=0.064) to be associated with increased lean growth rate. The genotype AB of CAST exon 6 tended (P=0.065) to be associated with increased lean growth rate. Variant B of ADRB3 was associated with increased weaning-weight and hot carcass weight.. Absence of variant A was associated with increased fat depth, but this finding is weak since only two individual pigs carried this genotype. Variant B of IGHA was associated with decreased fat depth. Together, these data suggest that genetic variation in MYF5, CAST, ADRB3 and IGHA may be involved in skeletal muscle growth and meat production in pigs. There was no association observed with variation in LEP and some variants of MYOG, CLPG and CAPN3 were at a low frequency, which precluded further analysis. Given that these results could be of benefit to the pig industry, the genes warrant further investigation.

Subjects/Keywords: genetic variation; weaning-weight; carcass traits; pig production; myogenic regulatory factor 5 gene (MYF5); myogenin gene (MYOG); myostatin gene (MSTN); callipyge gene (CLPG); calpastatin gene (CAST); calpain 3 gene (CAPN3); leptin gene (LEP); beta-3 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB3); immunoglobulin heavy alpha chain gene (IGHA); 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Kunhareang, S. (2014). Genes that affect meat production, fat deposition and carcass weight in pigs. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6247

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kunhareang, Sajee. “Genes that affect meat production, fat deposition and carcass weight in pigs.” 2014. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6247.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kunhareang, Sajee. “Genes that affect meat production, fat deposition and carcass weight in pigs.” 2014. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Kunhareang S. Genes that affect meat production, fat deposition and carcass weight in pigs. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2014. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6247.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kunhareang S. Genes that affect meat production, fat deposition and carcass weight in pigs. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/6247

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Zhang, Hong. Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Development And Differentiation by <i>Ski</i>.

Degree: PhD, Biochemistry, 2009, Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies

<i>Ski</i> is the most studied member of a family of proteins all sharing a conserved Dachshund homology domain. It has been implicated in oncogenic transformation, myogenic conversion of avian embryo fibroblasts and also many aspects of vertebrate development, especially myogenesis. <i>Ski</i>-/- mice exhibit severe defects in skeletal muscle and die at birth, yet little is know about either the underlying mechanisms or the role of <i>Ski</i> in adult muscle regeneration. In these studies, I used <i>Ski</i> knockout mice and C2C12 myoblast cultures to address these issues, respectively. Detailed analysis of <i>Ski</i>-/- embryos revealed dramatically reduced hypaxial muscles but less affected epaxial muscles. The reduced number of myogenic regulatory factor positive cells in <i>Ski</i>-/- mice suggested an insufficient myogenic cell pool to support muscle formation. However, both the dermomyotomal hypaxial progenitors and myotomal epaxial progenitors formed and committed to myogenic fate appropriately. The hypaxial muscle defect in <i>Ski</i>-/- mice was not caused by abnormal proliferation, terminal differentiation or apoptosis of the myogenic cells either, but due to impaired migration of embryonic hypaxial progenitors. Surprisingly, the normal distribution of fetal/postnatal myogenic progenitors in <i>Ski</i>-/- mice suggested different effects of <i>Ski</i> on the behaviors of embryonic and fetal/postnatal myogenic progenitors. In addition, although not affecting the terminal differentiation of embryonic myogenic cells, <i>Ski</i> was necessary for that of adult satellite-cell derived C2C12 myoblasts as evidenced by impaired myotube formation and reduced induction of genes essential for myogenic differentiation in the absence of Ski. This function was mainly mediated by Ski’s ability to form a complex with Six1 and Eya3 and activate <i>Myog</i> transcription through a MEF3 site. It is important in the future to further study mechanisms underlying the contrasting effects of <i>Ski</i> on embryonic, fetal and adult muscle development, to investigate how the association of Ski with Six1/Eya3 is triggered upon differentiation and to identify the transcriptional machinery mediates Ski’s action. The data presented here not only add a new aspect to the understanding of myogenic progenitor migration and hypaxial muscle development but also provide a starting point to achieve the regulation of muscle formation and regeneration through the action of <i>Ski</i>. Advisors/Committee Members: Samols, David (Committee Chair), Stavnezer, Ed (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical Research; <; i>; Ski<; /i>;

Myog regulatory region in differentiating myoblasts 153 MEF3 binding site is required for… …the activation of Myog regulatory region by Ski Ski associates with Eya3 and Six1 in… …activation of Myog transcription 163 Discussion 169 Future Directions 173 Mechanism of Myog… …for generating Myog regulatory regions for Myog-luciferase constructs Table 15. PCR… …primers for generating Myog-luciferase mutants Table 16. PCR primers for ChIP assays Table 17… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, H. (2009). Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Development And Differentiation by <i>Ski</i>. (Doctoral Dissertation). Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1226938149

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Hong. “Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Development And Differentiation by <i>Ski</i>.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. Accessed February 26, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1226938149.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Hong. “Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Development And Differentiation by <i>Ski</i>.” 2009. Web. 26 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhang H. Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Development And Differentiation by <i>Ski</i>. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies; 2009. [cited 2021 Feb 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1226938149.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang H. Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Development And Differentiation by <i>Ski</i>. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies; 2009. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1226938149

.