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You searched for subject:(Multisensory timing). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Bradford

1. Hanson, James Vincent Michael. The perceived timing of events across different sensory modalities : a psychophysical investigation of multisensory time perception in humans.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Bradford

The experiments reported within this thesis use psychophysical techniques to examine the factors which determine perceived multisensory timing in humans. Chapters 1 and 2 describe anatomical and psychophysical features of temporal processing, respectively, whilst Chapter 3 introduces the reader to psychophysical methods. Chapter 4 examines the relationship between two measures of sensory latency, reaction time (RT) and crossmodal temporal order judgment (TOJ). Despite task and attentional manipulations the two measures do not correlate, suggesting that they measure some fundamentally different aspect(s) of temporal perception. Chapter 5 examines the effects of adaptation to asynchronous stimulus pairs on perceived audiovisual (AV), audiotactile (AT) and visuotactile (VT) temporal order. Significant temporal shifts are recorded in all three conditions. Evidence is also presented showing that crossmodal TOJs are intransitive. Chapter 6 shows that concurrent adaptation to two sets of asynchronous AV stimulus pairs causes perceived AV temporal order to recalibrate at two locations simultaneously, and that AV asynchrony adaptation effects are significantly affected by observers' attention during adaptation. Finally, Chapter 7 shows that when observers are accustomed to a physical delay between motor actions and sensory events, an event presented at a reduced delay appears to precede the causative motor action. The data are well-described by a simple model based on a strong prior assumption of physical synchrony between motor actions and their sensory consequences.

Subjects/Keywords: 150.724; Multisensory timing; Psychophysical investigation; Time perception; Temporal processing; Humans; Sensory latency; Reaction time (RT); Crossmodal temporal order judgment (TOJ)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hanson, J. V. M. (2009). The perceived timing of events across different sensory modalities : a psychophysical investigation of multisensory time perception in humans. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Bradford. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10454/4290

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hanson, James Vincent Michael. “The perceived timing of events across different sensory modalities : a psychophysical investigation of multisensory time perception in humans.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Bradford. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10454/4290.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hanson, James Vincent Michael. “The perceived timing of events across different sensory modalities : a psychophysical investigation of multisensory time perception in humans.” 2009. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Hanson JVM. The perceived timing of events across different sensory modalities : a psychophysical investigation of multisensory time perception in humans. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Bradford; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10454/4290.

Council of Science Editors:

Hanson JVM. The perceived timing of events across different sensory modalities : a psychophysical investigation of multisensory time perception in humans. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Bradford; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10454/4290

2. Koehler, Seth D. Auditory-Somatosensory Integration in Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Mediates Normal and Phantom Sound Perception.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2013, University of Michigan

The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is the first auditory brainstem nucleus that processes and relays sensory information from multiple sensory modalities to higher auditory brain structures. Converging somatosensory and auditory inputs are integrated by bimodal DCN fusiform neurons, which use somatosensory context for improved auditory coding. Furthermore, phantom sound perception, or tinnitus, can be modulated or induced by somatosensory stimuli including facial pressure and has been linked to somatosensory-auditory processing in DCN. I present three in vivo neurophysiology studies in guinea pigs investigating the role of multisensory mechanisms in normal and tinnitus models. 1) DCN fusiform cells respond to sound with characteristic spike-timing patterns that are controlled by rapidly inactivating potassium conductances. I demonstrated here that somatosensory stimulation alters sound-evoked firing rates and temporal representations of sound for tens of milliseconds through synaptic modulation of intrinsic excitability. 2) Bimodal plasticity consists of alterations of sound-evoked responses for up to two hours after paired somatosensory-auditory stimulation. By varying the interval and order between sound and somatosensory stimuli, I demonstrated stimulus-timing dependent bimodal plasticity that implicates spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) as the underlying mechanism. The timing rules and time course of stimulus-timing dependent plasticity closely mimic those of STDP at synapses conveying somatosensory information to the DCN. These results suggest the DCN performs STDP-dependent adaptive processing such as suppression of body-generated sounds. 3) Finally, I assessed stimulus-timing dependence of bimodal plasticity in a tinnitus model. Guinea pigs were exposed to a narrowband noise that produced temporary shifts in auditory brainstem response thresholds and is known to produce tinnitus. Sixty percent of guinea pigs developed tinnitus according to behavioral testing by gap-induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response. Bimodal plasticity timing rules in animals with verified tinnitus were broader and more likely to be anti-Hebbian than those in sham animals or noise-exposed animals that did not develop tinnitus. Furthermore, exposed animals with tinnitus had weaker suppressive responses than either sham animals or exposed animals without tinnitus. These results suggest tinnitus development is linked to STDP, presenting a potential target for pharmacological or neuromodulatory tinnitus therapies. Advisors/Committee Members: Shore, Susan (committee member), Aldridge, J. Wayne (committee member), Zochowski, Michal R. (committee member), Wise, Kensall D. (committee member), Noll, Douglas C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Auditory System; Multisensory; Tinnitus; Plasticity; Spike-timing Dependent Plasticity; Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus; Biomedical Engineering; Physiology; Engineering; Science

…46 Figure 3.2 - Bimodal plasticity in DCN is stimulus-timing dependent… …stimulation....................................... 52 Figure 3.6 - Bimodal timing rules depend on… …Figure 3.7 - Sound-driven timing rules across unit response types… …54 Figure 3.8 - Spontaneous activity timing rules across unit response types… …74 Figure 4.5 – Bimodal plasticity population timing rules differ between exposed guinea… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koehler, S. D. (2013). Auditory-Somatosensory Integration in Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Mediates Normal and Phantom Sound Perception. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97934

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koehler, Seth D. “Auditory-Somatosensory Integration in Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Mediates Normal and Phantom Sound Perception.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97934.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koehler, Seth D. “Auditory-Somatosensory Integration in Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Mediates Normal and Phantom Sound Perception.” 2013. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Koehler SD. Auditory-Somatosensory Integration in Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Mediates Normal and Phantom Sound Perception. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97934.

Council of Science Editors:

Koehler SD. Auditory-Somatosensory Integration in Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Mediates Normal and Phantom Sound Perception. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/97934

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