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You searched for subject:(Moral Essays). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Harton Jr., Merle Carter. A Study of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1788).

Degree: PhD, 1987, McMaster University

The publication of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man in 1788 fully completed his project, begun in 1785 with his Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, to present to the public the substance of his lectures and reflections during his tenure as Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. The Active Powers comprises five essays on the metaphysics of causation and the foundation of morals – four essays dealing with causation, motivation, and human liberty, and a fifth containing the main lines of his theory of morals and critique of Hume's moral theory. Unlike the Intellectual Powers, and unlike his first book, An Inquiry into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense (1764), the Active Powers has kept the attention of few philosophers and scholars. Even those who have turned its pages are unclear about the central doctrines contained therein, and are accordingly undecided as to their implications and philosophical merits. Through a critical reconstruction of the Active Powers, this thesis remedies a long-standing neglect. After an extensive developmental exploration of Reid's epistemological designs and the naturalistic stamp of his theory of knowledge, I turn to his Active Powers and argue that the unifying doctrine of the essays is man's moral liberty, a doctrine that he supports with two strategic theses – first, that the only legitimate kind of cause, an efficient cause, is always an intelligent agent and, second, that men are efficient causes which act on rational motives. The first thesis has genuine religious implications, especially for his epistemology, but he cannot hold it, I argue, without also proving the second. Initially unable to do this, as a comparison with Hume demonstrates, Reid must then outline the nature of efficient causation by reason alone, and must prove that humans are efficient causes by rendering consistent our commitment to the durable causal principle, Every event must have an efficient cause that produced it, and what is necessarily demanded by our natural system of morals. Although the balance between animal motivation and the practical ends provided by reason is uneven, only the latter enable men to have moral liberty and make it possible for us both to accept the causal principle and to have the freedom required by our system of morals. Unfortunately, I argue, Reid's need for the motivation of reasons, or "rational principles of action," entails an untoward paradox: Either no efficient cause acts on reasons or liberty is simply irrelevant to our acting morally.

Thesis

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Noxon, James, Philosophy.

Subjects/Keywords: Reid's Essays; religious; Active Powers of Man; moral; liberty

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harton Jr., M. C. (1987). A Study of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1788). (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16655

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harton Jr., Merle Carter. “A Study of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1788).” 1987. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed September 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16655.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harton Jr., Merle Carter. “A Study of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1788).” 1987. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Harton Jr. MC. A Study of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1788). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 1987. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16655.

Council of Science Editors:

Harton Jr. MC. A Study of Reid's Essays on the Active Powers of Man (1788). [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 1987. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16655

2. Phenix, Ruby. The Moral Philosophy of James Boswell.

Degree: 1948, North Texas State Teachers College

It is the purpose of the author to outline briefly some of the intellectual ideas relating to the nature of man, his conception of religion, his social manners and customs, and to reveal, through the "Hypochondriack" essays, that James Boswell was a peculiarly eighteenth-century figure in certain aspects of his moral philosophy. Advisors/Committee Members: Wells, M. P., Hamilton, Sidney.

Subjects/Keywords: James Boswell; moral philosophy; eighteenth century; Hypochondriack essays; Boswell, James, 1740-1795  – Philosophy.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Phenix, R. (1948). The Moral Philosophy of James Boswell. (Thesis). North Texas State Teachers College. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83431/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Phenix, Ruby. “The Moral Philosophy of James Boswell.” 1948. Thesis, North Texas State Teachers College. Accessed September 21, 2020. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83431/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Phenix, Ruby. “The Moral Philosophy of James Boswell.” 1948. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Phenix R. The Moral Philosophy of James Boswell. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Texas State Teachers College; 1948. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83431/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Phenix R. The Moral Philosophy of James Boswell. [Thesis]. North Texas State Teachers College; 1948. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83431/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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