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You searched for subject:(Military simulations). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Du, Ran. A Quantitative Approach to Military Water System Vulnerability Assessments.

Degree: 2014, Johns Hopkins University

The Department of the Army routinely conducts water system vulnerability assessment (WSVA) on military water distribution systems (WDS). Risk assessors construct attack scenarios and then estimate the risks using their expert judgment. These risk assessments are traditionally difficult to support with evidence and historical data. As a result, decision makers often question the validity of the assessor findings and their recommendations. The goal of this research paper is to improve the WSVA program by presenting decision makers with quantifiable risk. I propose a hybrid risk analysis based on hydraulic modeling and probabilistic risk analysis. This improved methodology (WSVA2) presents a quantitative approach to risk assessment and uses simulations to support the assessor’s expert judgment. A fictitious military WDS and its data are created to avoid disclosure of sensitive information. Hydraulic simulation models are used to assess the consequences of a successful contamination attack and to evaluate the outcome of a catastrophic scenario. Three unknowns of the scenarios are the contaminant toxicity, contaminant reaction rate in water and contaminant quantity used in the attack. Attack simulations are randomly generated using distribution curves based on both known studies and assumptions. Monte Carlo simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties of the model. Findings show that 53,126 Exposure Incidents (EI) resulted from the contamination attack on Water Tower 1. In the catastrophic scenario, over 400,000 EI occurred in 1 week which affected over 4,000 people in the Hexagon Building. And in an attack-response scenario, hydraulic modeling is used to demonstrate that the current Emergency Response Plan (ERP) cannot sufficiently mitigate the contamination threat below Military Exposure Guideline (MEG) level. Advisors/Committee Members: Guikema, Seth (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: military; water distribution system; risk analysis; expert judgment; simulations; catastrophic; contaminant; monte carlo; hydraulic modeling; exposure; multi attribute utility theory; emergency response plan; mitigation; military exposure guideline

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APA (6th Edition):

Du, R. (2014). A Quantitative Approach to Military Water System Vulnerability Assessments. (Thesis). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved from http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37119

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Du, Ran. “A Quantitative Approach to Military Water System Vulnerability Assessments.” 2014. Thesis, Johns Hopkins University. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37119.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Du, Ran. “A Quantitative Approach to Military Water System Vulnerability Assessments.” 2014. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Du R. A Quantitative Approach to Military Water System Vulnerability Assessments. [Internet] [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37119.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Du R. A Quantitative Approach to Military Water System Vulnerability Assessments. [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37119

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Central Florida

2. Lucario, Thomas. The Use Of Pc Based Simulation Systems In The Training Of Army Infantry Officers - An Evaluation Of The Rapid Decision Trainer.

Degree: 2006, University of Central Florida

This research considers two modes of training Army infantry officers in initial training to conduct a platoon live fire exercise. Leaders from groups that were training with the current classroom training methods were compared to leaders from groups whose training was augmented with a PC based training system known as the Rapid Decision Trainer (RDT). The RDT was developed by the US Army Research Development and Engineering Command for the purpose of aiding in the training of tactical decision making and troop leading procedures of officers in the initial levels of training to become rifle platoon leaders. The RDT allows the leader in training to run through platoon level operations prior to live execution in a simulated combat environment. The focus of the system is on leadership tasks and decision making in areas such as unit movement, internal unit communication and contingency planning, and other dismounted infantry operations. Over the past year, some Infantry Officer Basic Course platoons at Ft. Benning have used the RDT in an experimental manner. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the system is beneficial in training IOBC officers. The Army Research Institute (ARI) conducted a preliminary evaluation of the RDT in March 2005 (Beal 2005). However, no quantitative measures were used in the evaluation of the RDT, only subjective evaluations of the users. Additionally, there were no formal evaluations by the training cadre, only the users themselves. This experiment continues the work of ARI and uses qualitative and quantitative data from both users and the evaluating cadre. In this experiment, the effectiveness of the RDT was evaluated through measuring leader behaviors and personal preferences. Three measurement approaches were used; (1) quantitative performance measures of leader actions, (2) qualitative situational awareness and evaluations of inclusion in the non leader players, and (3) a qualitative evaluation of the system's usability and effectiveness by system users. Analysis reveals statistically significant findings that challenge the current norms. Advisors/Committee Members: Proctor, Michael.

Subjects/Keywords: simulation; military training; desktop simulations; decision making; infantry operations; Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lucario, T. (2006). The Use Of Pc Based Simulation Systems In The Training Of Army Infantry Officers - An Evaluation Of The Rapid Decision Trainer. (Masters Thesis). University of Central Florida. Retrieved from https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/805

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lucario, Thomas. “The Use Of Pc Based Simulation Systems In The Training Of Army Infantry Officers - An Evaluation Of The Rapid Decision Trainer.” 2006. Masters Thesis, University of Central Florida. Accessed October 20, 2020. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/805.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lucario, Thomas. “The Use Of Pc Based Simulation Systems In The Training Of Army Infantry Officers - An Evaluation Of The Rapid Decision Trainer.” 2006. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Lucario T. The Use Of Pc Based Simulation Systems In The Training Of Army Infantry Officers - An Evaluation Of The Rapid Decision Trainer. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Central Florida; 2006. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/805.

Council of Science Editors:

Lucario T. The Use Of Pc Based Simulation Systems In The Training Of Army Infantry Officers - An Evaluation Of The Rapid Decision Trainer. [Masters Thesis]. University of Central Florida; 2006. Available from: https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/805

3. -7122-1968. Evolving scout agents for military simulations.

Degree: MSin Computer Sciences, Computer Sciences, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Simulations play an increasingly significant role in training and preparing the military, particularly in environments with constrained budgets. Unfortunately, in most cases a small number of people must control a large number of simulated vehicles and soldiers. This often leads to micromanagement of computer-controlled forces in order to get them to exhibit the human-like characteristics of an enemy force. This thesis uses Neuroevolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT) to train neural networks to perform the role of scouts which analyze the terrain and decide where to place themselves to best observe the enemy forces. The main attribute that the scout agents consider is a vapor flow rate from the enemy starting location to their intended objective, which according to previous studies indicates likely chokepoints along the enemy route. This thesis experiments with different configurations of sensors and fitness functions in order to maximize how much of the enemy team is spotted over the course of the scenario. The results show that these agents perform better than randomly placed scouts and better than scouts deployed using heuristics in many situations, although not consistently so. Evolutionary optimization of scout agents using vapor flow is thus a promising approach for developing autonomous scout agents in military simulations. Advisors/Committee Members: Miikkulainen, Risto (advisor), Ballard, Dana (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: NEAT; Neural networks; Military simulations; Military terrain analysis; Neuroevolution; Autonomous agents

…computer simulations in the military will continue to increase in the years ahead. This thesis… …2.4 CONCLUSION This thesis develops the field of autonomous agents in military simulations… …55 x Chapter 1: Introduction Over the past three decades, computer simulations in the… …technology allow geographically dispersed military units to train and fight together on a digital… …focuses on simulations that support collective training, which is defined as training that… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-7122-1968. (2015). Evolving scout agents for military simulations. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31850

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-7122-1968. “Evolving scout agents for military simulations.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31850.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-7122-1968. “Evolving scout agents for military simulations.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-7122-1968. Evolving scout agents for military simulations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31850.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-7122-1968. Evolving scout agents for military simulations. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31850

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

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