Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Middle class Jews). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Michigan State University

1. Marlow, Jennifer Lynn. Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland.

Degree: 2014, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. History - Doctor of Philosophy 2014.

The dissertation examines the role of Polish Catholic domestic workers employed in middle-class Jewish households during the interwar period and the ways that the relationships that developed in the domestic realm influenced decisions to seek or provide aid during the Holocaust. It argues that the relationships that sometimes formed in the domestic realm caused Polish Catholic domestic workers to see their Jewish employers as belonging to their own community of obligation and to sometimes then aid them during the Nazi persecution. In addition, this work examines how middle-class Polish culture was transmitted to Jewish children by their acculturated parents, sometimes via the family's Polish Catholic maid and the ways this maid also familiarized her charges with Polish Catholic peasant culture. This dissertation asserts that this familiarity with Polish culture and the hybrid identities the children of these households sometimes formed was useful in later allowing them to pass as Catholic Poles on the so-called Aryan side if the opportunity was present during the Nazi Occupation period. The dissertation is comprised of two parts. The first examines the prewar period to explore how Polish Catholic women from the countryside made their niches within urban Jewish households, how Polish middle class culture was transmitted to children in acculturated Jewish homes, and to examine how these children then further developed their hybridic Polish Jewish identities while in the public realm, away from the control of their parents and caregivers. The second part of the dissertation examines the initial responses of the domestic workers and their Jewish employers to the Nazi invasion of Poland and the ghettoization of the Jewish population, how it was decided to place Jewish children and families into hiding outside the ghetto, and case studies of children hidden with their former Polish caregivers.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF t.p. (viewed Sept. 18, 2014)

Advisors/Committee Members: Hanshew, Karrin M, Stauter-Halsted, Keely, Waltzer, Kenneth, Ray, Marcie, Smith, Aminda.

Subjects/Keywords: Women household employees – Poland – History – 20th century; Nannies – Poland – History – 20th century; Catholic women – Poland – History – 20th century; Middle class Jews – Poland – History – 20th century; Jewish children – Poland – History – 20th century; Jewish children – Poland – Ethnic identity; Rural-urban migration – Poland – History – 20th century; Peasants – Poland – History – 20th century; Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) – Poland; World War, 1939-1945 – Jews – Rescue; Jewish children in the Holocaust – Poland; Women household employees; Social aspects; Rural-urban migration; Peasants; Nannies; Middle class Jews; Jewish children in the Holocaust; Jewish children; Catholic women; European history; East European studies; Holocaust studies

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marlow, J. L. (2014). Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marlow, Jennifer Lynn. “Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland.” 2014. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marlow, Jennifer Lynn. “Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland.” 2014. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Marlow JL. Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Marlow JL. Polish Catholic maids and nannies : female aid and the domestic realm in Nazi-occupied Poland. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2014. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:2801

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Kamal, Amr Tawfik. Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean.

Degree: PhD, Comparative Literature, 2013, University of Michigan

Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean examines the function of nineteenth-century Egyptian and French department stores as urban spaces and literary symbols which shaped and contested the concept of citizenship in both nations. I offer a new reading of these spaces by contextualizing narratives about them within the modern history of the Mediterranean, divided as it was among the British, French and Ottoman empires. I trace the historiography of the modern Mediterranean to the vision developed by the French utopianist Saint-Simon (1760-1825). Saint-Simon imagined the modern Mediterranean as a “mother sea” bringing together Orient and Occident, connected by networks of trade and transport. Such a vision would later be realized through projects promoted by his disciples, such as the Suez Canal and the urban planning of Cairo. French and Egyptian department stores, inspired by the Saint-Simonian project, assumed a key role in modern Mediterranean culture, as they formed commercial and cultural networks in a transnational, colonial, and postcolonial context. Drawing on archival documentation as well as literary works, and invoking theories of human geography and cultural memory, I reconstruct the urban and cultural history of the Parisian and Cairene department stores to examine their role as urban and cultural landmarks, which influenced the city dwellers’ notions of gender, class and race. Through a study of Emile Zola’s Au bonheur des dames, Huda Shaarawi’s Arabic memoirs and her newspaper L’Egyptienne, Jacqueline Kahanoff’s Jacob’s Ladder, and a selection of contemporary works — Latifa el Zayat’s Al-Bab Maftuh (The Open Door), Paula Jacques’s Lumière de l’oeil and Gilda Stambouli souffre et se plaint, Robert Solé’s Le tarbouche, Waguih Ghali’s Beer in the Snooker Club, Victor Teboul’s La Longue découverte de l’étrangeté, Samir Raafat’s Cairo, the early years, and Ilios Yannakakis’s Alexandria 1860-1960 —, I reveal how the Francophilia, Egyptomania and Orientalism sustained by department stores led Egyptian and French writers to use the stores as a strategic literary symbol in rewriting a critical moment of their nation’s history, to reinvent their national identity, and to interrogate issues of modernity, cosmopolitanism, Levantinism, and social equality. Advisors/Committee Members: Hannoosh, Michele A. (committee member), Bardenstein, Carol (committee member), Shammas, Anton (committee member), Hayes, Jarrod L. (committee member), Domosh, Mona (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mediterranean Studies, Saint-Simon and Saint-Simonianism, Commercial Culture, Department Stores, France, Egypt, Human Geography; French and Francophone Studies, Postcolonial Literature, Egyptomania, Francophilia, Cosmopolitanism, Levantinism; Political Economy in Modern France and Egypt, Class and Gender Relations in Modern France and Egypt, French and Egyptian Nationalism, Imperialism; French, British, and Ottoman Empires, France of the Second Empire, Material Culture in France and Egypt; Sites of Memory (Lieux De MéMoire), Cartographic Anxiety, Nineteenth-Century Egypt, Nineteenth-Century France and Egypt, Orientalism; French Culture and Literature in Egypt, Jews from Egypt, Levantine Culture in Egypt; English Language and Literature; General and Comparative Literature; History (General); Humanities (General); Judaic Studies; Middle Eastern, Near Eastern and North African Studies; Romance Languages and Literature; West European Studies; Women's and Gender Studies; Humanities

…dwellers’ notions of gender, class and race. Through a study of Emile Zola’s Au bonheur des dames… …function of a “Franco-Egyptian” department store in the middle of an Arab-Ottoman country… …readers’, perceptions and promote the ideologies and social codes of the dominant class; the use… …networks and, by means of inclusion or exclusion, act as markers of race and class. Most… …is especially revealing: mostly Jews from Egypt and Syrians, their adoption of Francophone… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kamal, A. T. (2013). Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/102450

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kamal, Amr Tawfik. “Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/102450.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kamal, Amr Tawfik. “Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean.” 2013. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kamal AT. Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/102450.

Council of Science Editors:

Kamal AT. Empires and Emporia: Fictions of the Department Store in the Modern Mediterranean. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/102450

.