Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Middle born children). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


North-West University

1. Van Zyl, Heleneze. Resilience among middle-born children / H. van Zyl .

Degree: 2011, North-West University

Existing literature on resilience portrays middle-born children as vulnerable. Middle-born children have to face many risks, such as a tendency towards delinquent behaviour, having poor relations with family members, being low achievers and harbouring negative feelings. Many children who face risk and who consequently are in danger of maladaptive outcomes manage to bounce back from these risks. Such children are called resilient. Research suggests that resilience among children is a common phenomenon, but no literature exists that focuses specifically on resilience among middle-born children. Because of personal experience, I as the researcher believe middle-born children can display resilience in the face of their particular risks. The purpose of this study therefore was to explore, by means of a literature study and empirical research, what the antecedents of resilience among middle-born children might be. This was done by using a concurrent triangulated mixed method design: Six resilient middle-born children completed a self-report questionnaire (RSCA) and participated in semi-structured interviews. The findings were mixed and allowed understanding of what encourages resilience in middle-born children. This study contributes to theory by identifying the resilience-promoting processes (both intra- and interpersonal) which contribute to resilience among middle-born children. This study's findings also transform the stereotypical view of middle-born children as vulnerable only.

Subjects/Keywords: Resilience; Attachment; Middle-born children; Birth order; Risk and protective processes

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Zyl, H. (2011). Resilience among middle-born children / H. van Zyl . (Thesis). North-West University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7252

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Zyl, Heleneze. “Resilience among middle-born children / H. van Zyl .” 2011. Thesis, North-West University. Accessed March 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7252.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Zyl, Heleneze. “Resilience among middle-born children / H. van Zyl .” 2011. Web. 31 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Van Zyl H. Resilience among middle-born children / H. van Zyl . [Internet] [Thesis]. North-West University; 2011. [cited 2020 Mar 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7252.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Van Zyl H. Resilience among middle-born children / H. van Zyl . [Thesis]. North-West University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10394/7252

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Botha, Jeanine. Exploring the utility of use of an isiXhosa version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children in a group of 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking learners in the Western Cape; a mixed method study.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2019, Stellenbosch University

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Various studies have found the incidence of anxiety symptomology amongst South African children to be especially high. Research suggests that symptoms of anxiety may be minimised by increasing an individual’s level of self-efficacy, and various studies illustrate the efficacy of intervention programmes aimed at minimising the symptoms of anxiety through increasing self-efficacy. Timely intervention requires the availability of reliable and valid screening tools. However, many anxiety and self-efficacy measures currently used in the South African context are not adapted for use within our diverse, multicultural context. Considering the lack of standardised anxiety and self-efficacy measures in South Africa, this study aimed to explore whether the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children (SEQ-C) can serve as reliable screening measures in a sample of 189 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking South African children residing in the Western Cape. Quantitative data analysis was used to investigate the psychometric properties (i.e., reliability and factor structure) of the translated versions of the SCAS and SEQ-C, to determine if a significant negative correlation exists between self-efficacy and anxiety, to determine if significant correlations exist between anxiety and age and self-efficacy and age and to determine whether there are significant differences in SEQ-C and SCAS scores by gender. Qualitative focus group interviews were conducted to explore how participants understood the translated versions of the questionnaires, and whether cultural and/or linguistic differences influenced how participants understood and therefore answered the questions. Quantitative results indicated acceptable reliability for both scales. However, the expected factor structure was not obtained for either scale in this sample. While all the expected statistical results were not obtained, some of the psychometric properties of the SCAS and SEQ-C are promising. This provides limited support for the reliability of their use within this sample. Results from the qualitative focus groups indicated that cultural and linguistic differences appear to influence learners’ understanding and interpretation of the questionnaires and may therefore have an impact on the reliability of both the SCAS and SEQ-C. This study has drawn attention to how linguistic nuances and cultural practices influence children’s understanding of questions on psychological measures, which in turn influences how they answer the questions. This underscores the fact that measures developed in Western countries cannot necessarily be used reliably amongst all population groups in South Africa and stresses the need for the development of culturally appropriate tests.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Verskeie navorsingsstudies het gevind dat die insidensie van angssimptomologie besonders hoog is onder Suid-Afrikaanse kinders. Navorsing dui aan dat angsimptome verminder kan word deur ‘n individu se…

Advisors/Committee Members: Lesch, A. M., Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dept. of Psychology..

Subjects/Keywords: Spence Children's anxiety Scale; UCTD; Anxiety; Self-efficacy; Middle-born children

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Botha, J. (2019). Exploring the utility of use of an isiXhosa version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children in a group of 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking learners in the Western Cape; a mixed method study. (Masters Thesis). Stellenbosch University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106139

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Botha, Jeanine. “Exploring the utility of use of an isiXhosa version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children in a group of 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking learners in the Western Cape; a mixed method study.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Stellenbosch University. Accessed March 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106139.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Botha, Jeanine. “Exploring the utility of use of an isiXhosa version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children in a group of 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking learners in the Western Cape; a mixed method study.” 2019. Web. 31 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Botha J. Exploring the utility of use of an isiXhosa version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children in a group of 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking learners in the Western Cape; a mixed method study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2019. [cited 2020 Mar 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106139.

Council of Science Editors:

Botha J. Exploring the utility of use of an isiXhosa version of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children in a group of 6–10-year-old isiXhosa-speaking learners in the Western Cape; a mixed method study. [Masters Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106139

3. Clark, Emmarentia. Absence of fathers on middle childhood boys at a primary school.

Degree: 2015, University of Johannesburg

M.A. (Clinical Social Work)

This research involves exploring how middle childhood boys at a primary school experience the phenomenon of growing up with an absent father both functionally and psychosocially. The absent father being defined as a living father who does not live with his son and has chosen to be uninvolved in a financial, physical, emotional or spiritual way and has little contact with his son. The goal of the study was to investigate the effect of absent fathers on middle childhood boys and to gain an understanding of how they view the absence of a father in their lives. The objectives included exploring the experience of the boys in growing up with an absent father, to determine the boy’s perception of how their father’s absence has impacted on their lives, as well as to make recommendations for social work and other social service practitioners. A qualitative approach was selected for this study with a view to allowing participants to give rich descriptions of their individual experiences of growing up with an absent father. It is an exploratory study, informed by phenomenology. Exploratory, as it necessitated gaining insight into a situation and phenomenological as it entailed describing the participants experience of their life story. The research population for this study was defined as all boys in Grade Seven at the primary school. The boys were aged between twelve and thirteen. Purposive sampling was used as it allowed the researcher to select the participants based on necessary and relevant criteria. Five participants were selected as the researcher believed that it would give a sufficient overview of the phenomenon being researched and would reach data saturation. The interviews were all started with the same request namely, “Tell me about your relationship with your father?” Thereafter a semi-structured interview schedule was used as a backup tool when relevant questions needed to be asked. Participants were prepared for the interviews prior to the commencement of the study. Data was analysed according to a phenomenological method namely, Familiarisation; Immersion/Bracketing; Inducing Themes; Coding; Elaboration and Interpretation. These procedures were followed until a full description of the participants’ experience of absent fathers was disclosed. Four themes namely, emotions, loss, self-esteem and the single mother were identified ...

Subjects/Keywords: Middle-born children; Absentee fathers; Father and child; Fathers and sons

…CONCLUSION 49 CHAPTER 4: RESEARCH FINDINGS ON ABSENT FATHERS ON MIDDLE CHILDHOOD BOYS AT A… …in the divorce rate. The high rate of divorce is a risk factor for children leading to… …family. In this study, children from different race groups were chosen, where possible, as the… …that remained to be answered was “What are the experiences of middle childhood boys being… …situations, self-critical and guilt ridden children. The reason for the above being that growing up… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clark, E. (2015). Absence of fathers on middle childhood boys at a primary school. (Thesis). University of Johannesburg. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10210/13742

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clark, Emmarentia. “Absence of fathers on middle childhood boys at a primary school.” 2015. Thesis, University of Johannesburg. Accessed March 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10210/13742.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clark, Emmarentia. “Absence of fathers on middle childhood boys at a primary school.” 2015. Web. 31 Mar 2020.

Vancouver:

Clark E. Absence of fathers on middle childhood boys at a primary school. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Johannesburg; 2015. [cited 2020 Mar 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10210/13742.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Clark E. Absence of fathers on middle childhood boys at a primary school. [Thesis]. University of Johannesburg; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10210/13742

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.