Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Middle Precontact Period). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Cahill, Nathalie. The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan.

Degree: 2012, University of Saskatchewan

The Camp Rayner site (EgNr-2) is a multicomponent site located approximately 135km south of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and is situated along the northern shoreline of Lake Diefenbaker and the western shoreline of Hitchcock Bay. The Saskatchewan Archaeological Society conducted field school excavations at Camp Rayner between the years of 1987 and 1995 as part of a salvage/rescue program for reasons of potential heritage displacement and site destruction. In total, 53 1x1m2 units were opened and revealed 7 occupation levels that span the Terminal Late Paleoindian to the Late Precontact period. Two radiocarbon dates were obtained which corroborates with both the Terminal Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period. Research included an analysis of the entire cultural assemblage to reconstruct the cultural sequence of the site. This site offers a unique opportunity to study a number of archaeological cultures on the Northern Plains. The presence of an in situ Terminal Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period occupation with correlating radiocarbon dates are of considerable significance due to their rarity on the northern grasslands. The recovery of Sandy Creek points and other Late Middle Period projectile points are also regarded as especially significant due to an increase in cultural complexity during the Late Middle and Late Precontact periods. The Camp Rayner site is one of the most significant sites in Saskatchewan. Cultural material at this site represents the last 9,000 years of human occupation with in situ deposits spanning approximately 7,000 years ago. The continuous investigation and monitoring of the archaeological record recovered at this site is the key to maintaining these non-renewable resources. The information gathered from this research will supplement research on archaeological occupations of the Northern Plains and will initiate a resource management plan for future excavations and site preservation. Advisors/Committee Members: Walker, Ernest G., Walker, Ryan, Meyer, David, Kennedy, Margaret.

Subjects/Keywords: Camp Rayner Site; Multi-Component Site; EgNr-2; Terminal Late Paleoindian; Resource Management Plan; Middle Precontact Period

…150 13.1.3 Late Middle Precontact Period… …This is followed by the Middle Precontact period (7,500 to 2,000 years B.P.) which… …150 13.1.2 Early Middle Period: Mummy Cave Series… …Middle Middle Precontact periods. The thesis will also be utilized as a comparative framework… …of the Late Precontact period prior to European contact. Chapter 4 describes the initial… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cahill, N. (2012). The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cahill, Nathalie. “The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan.” 2012. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed February 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cahill, Nathalie. “The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan.” 2012. Web. 26 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Cahill N. The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2012. [cited 2020 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cahill N. The Camp Rayner Site (EgNr-2) : archaeological investigations of a multi-component site in south-central Saskatchewan. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2012-07-533

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

2. Frary, Heather E. The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) : a re-examination of the terminal middle precontact period.

Degree: 2009, University of Saskatchewan

The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) is a multicomponent precontact site located within the confines of the Wanuskewin Heritage Park, three kilometres north of the city of Saskatoon. The University of Saskatchewan conducted field school excavations as part of a long term study by in conjunction with Wanuskewin Heritage Park. Excavations exposed over 40 m2 and 10 occupation levels. Cultural affiliations of the buried levels range from the McKean complex in the deeper levels, through Pelican Lake, Sandy Creek, Besant, Avonlea, and indeterminate components. Radiocarbon dates from four levels corroborate the time frame of the occupation levels. Research includes an analysis of artifacts, ecofacts and features from each cultural level to determine how the site was used in each time period. The Terminal Middle Precontact period is a time of increased cultural complexity on the Northern Plains. This study focuses on the 2500 to 2000 B.P. time frame during which a number of cultural expressions are observed in the archaeological record including Pelican Lake, Sandy Creek, Besant, Plains Woodland, and previously un-named complexes. The archaeological remains recovered from Meewasin Creek are compared to a number of similarly aged sites in the Northern Plains including Mortlach, Sjovold, Walter Felt, as well as the single component Rocky Island site. By comparing the lithic and faunal assemblages at these key sites, we can draw a better view of the cultural systems present on the Northern Plains. From this benchmark we can form a more holistic cultural chronology on the Northern Plains, particularly in central Saskatchewan. Advisors/Committee Members: Walker, Ernest G, Kennedy, Margaret, Linnamae, Urve, Natcher, David.

Subjects/Keywords: Precontact Archaeology; Wanuskewin Heritage Park; Middle Precontact Period

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Frary, H. E. (2009). The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) : a re-examination of the terminal middle precontact period. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09012009-154924

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Frary, Heather E. “The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) : a re-examination of the terminal middle precontact period.” 2009. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed February 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09012009-154924.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Frary, Heather E. “The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) : a re-examination of the terminal middle precontact period.” 2009. Web. 26 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Frary HE. The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) : a re-examination of the terminal middle precontact period. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. [cited 2020 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09012009-154924.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Frary HE. The Meewasin Creek site (FbNp-9) : a re-examination of the terminal middle precontact period. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-09012009-154924

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

3. Rychlo, Jennifer. The Camp Rayner Site: Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period Transitions on the Northern Plains.

Degree: 2016, University of Saskatchewan

The Camp Rayner site (EgNr-2) is a multicomponent site located on the northern shores of Lake Diefenbaker in central Saskatchewan. Excavations at the site were carried out from 1987 to 1997 as part of the Saskatchewan Archaeological Society’s public field school and complete analysis of the materials recovered took place in 2012 as part of Nathalie Cahill’s M.A. Thesis. Using diagnostic lithic tools to reconstruct the cultural occupations at the site, Cahill (2012) determined that the site was repeatedly occupied from the Terminal/Late Paleoindian period to the Late Precontact period. The earliest components at the site, Cultural Zones 7 and 6, have been radiocarbon dated to the Terminal/Late Paleoindian period (8,500 to 7,500 BP) and the Early Middle Precontact period (7,500 to 5,000 BP), respectively. This era in the Northern Plains cultural chronology corresponds to a climatic event known as the Hypsithermal, which affected the Northern Plains from approximately 9,000 to 5,000 years BP. Sites dating to this time period are comparatively rare on the Northern Plains. As such the cultural transitions between the Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle periods and the adaptations to the Hypsithermal climates remain poorly understood. A detailed reanalysis was carried out of the lithic and faunal assemblages from the Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Precontact period components at the Camp Rayner site. The assemblages from both time periods reflect broad based subsistence approaches and restricted mobility patterns, based on the presence of a variety of faunal species and predominance of locally sourced lithics. This pattern is apparent at other assemblages dating to these time periods from various sites on the Northern Plains. From these assemblages, it is clear that broad range subsistence approaches and a focus on local lithics characterizes both the Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle periods. Furthermore, these sites indicate that humans restricted their movements to regions with abundant food and water resources such as the major drainage systems and the peripheries of the Northern Plains. In addition to the research component for this thesis, a Heritage Resource Management Plan has been formulated for the Camp Rayner site. Overall, the site contains a significant degree of historical, cultural, and scientific value for the Province of Saskatchewan. Unfortunately, numerous impacts such as shoreline erosion, pedestrian activity, and the potential for future development are impacting the site’s intact components. Through consultation with adjacent landowners and communities, recommendations and policy options for site preservation and management have been put forward. From these, it is the hope that the long term preservation and survival of the Camp Rayner site’s historic and Precontact components is ensured. Advisors/Committee Members: Walker, Ernest G., Kennedy, Margaret, Stuart, Glenn, Akkerman, Avi, Westman, Clint.

Subjects/Keywords: Archaeology; Precontact; Hypsithermal; Terminal/Late Paleoindian; Early Middle Period; Cultural Transitions

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rychlo, J. (2016). The Camp Rayner Site: Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period Transitions on the Northern Plains. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7330

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rychlo, Jennifer. “The Camp Rayner Site: Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period Transitions on the Northern Plains.” 2016. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed February 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7330.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rychlo, Jennifer. “The Camp Rayner Site: Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period Transitions on the Northern Plains.” 2016. Web. 26 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Rychlo J. The Camp Rayner Site: Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period Transitions on the Northern Plains. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2016. [cited 2020 Feb 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7330.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rychlo J. The Camp Rayner Site: Terminal/Late Paleoindian and Early Middle Period Transitions on the Northern Plains. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/7330

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.