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You searched for subject:(Middle Mississippi River). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Southern Illinois University

1. Ryherd, Julia Kay. QUANTIFYING THE RATES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF RECENT SEDIMENTATION WITHIN THE HYDROLOGICALLY CONNECTED FLOODPLAINS OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, USA, USING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DENDROGEOMORPHOLOGY.

Degree: MS, Geography and Environmental Resources, 2017, Southern Illinois University

The construction of levees along the Mississippi River [MR], beginning in the mid-to-late nineteenth century, have isolated the river along many segments from its floodplain. Sediment from the river is currently deposited in the hydrologically connected floodplain [HCF], the area between the channel margin at low water and the levees. Researchers have studied the amount and rates of sediment deposition along the Upper and Lower Mississippi River segments from the headwaters to Pool 22 and from the Ohio River to the delta; however, no such assessments have been undertaken along the Middle Mississippi River [MMR]. This study attempts to fill the knowledge gap by assessing sedimentation along three islands within the Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge. On these islands two approaches were undertaken to assess sedimentation along the MMR’s HCF: dendrogeomorphology and the DEM of Difference [DoD] approach. The dendrogeomorphic approach uses tree-ring analyses to document and interpret geomorphic processes and the rates at which they are occurring. The DoD approach subtracts an older DEM from a newer DEM in order to see the change in elevation/depth over time. The geomorphology of the islands and then the entire MMR HCF (from the confluence of the Missouri River to Thebes, IL) were mapped. Using the sedimentation rates for the geomorphic landforms from the three study islands, the sedimentation rates and volumes for the aforementioned portion of the MMR’s HCF were estimated. The estimated volume of sediment was then compared to the MMR’s suspended sediment flux to determine how much of the suspended sediment was going into storage within the MMR’s HCF. The dendrogeomorphic and DoD methods for the study islands yielded average sedimentation rates of 13.3-16.9 mm year-1 and 21.5-80.1 mm year-1, respectively. The rates for the individual landforms on the islands using the dendrogeomorphic results ranged from 5.2 mm year-1 for the splay to 21.8 mm year-1 for the natural levee and splay, with a weighted average of 16.6 mm year-1 for the MMR HCF. Using these rates and the likely range of densities for the floodplain sediments, it is estimated that 4.9-6.6 million metric tons of sediment is accumulating within the MMR annually. This is approximately 5.4-7.4% of the average annual suspended sediment load of the Mississippi River at St. Louis. This means that the MMR is a major sediment sink. If these relatively rapid rates of deposition continue, they have the potential to substantially reduce the HCF’s ability to convey and store flood water which will result in increased flood levels and, consequently, flood risk within the MMR’s levee protected floodplain in the coming decades. Advisors/Committee Members: Remo, Jonathan.

Subjects/Keywords: DEM of Difference [DoD]; Dendrochronology; Dendrogeomorphology; Floodplain Sedimentation; Geomorphology; Middle Mississippi River

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APA (6th Edition):

Ryherd, J. K. (2017). QUANTIFYING THE RATES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF RECENT SEDIMENTATION WITHIN THE HYDROLOGICALLY CONNECTED FLOODPLAINS OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, USA, USING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DENDROGEOMORPHOLOGY. (Masters Thesis). Southern Illinois University. Retrieved from https://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/theses/2189

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ryherd, Julia Kay. “QUANTIFYING THE RATES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF RECENT SEDIMENTATION WITHIN THE HYDROLOGICALLY CONNECTED FLOODPLAINS OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, USA, USING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DENDROGEOMORPHOLOGY.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Southern Illinois University. Accessed November 28, 2020. https://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/theses/2189.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ryherd, Julia Kay. “QUANTIFYING THE RATES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF RECENT SEDIMENTATION WITHIN THE HYDROLOGICALLY CONNECTED FLOODPLAINS OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, USA, USING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DENDROGEOMORPHOLOGY.” 2017. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Ryherd JK. QUANTIFYING THE RATES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF RECENT SEDIMENTATION WITHIN THE HYDROLOGICALLY CONNECTED FLOODPLAINS OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, USA, USING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DENDROGEOMORPHOLOGY. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Southern Illinois University; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: https://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/theses/2189.

Council of Science Editors:

Ryherd JK. QUANTIFYING THE RATES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF RECENT SEDIMENTATION WITHIN THE HYDROLOGICALLY CONNECTED FLOODPLAINS OF THE MIDDLE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, USA, USING DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DENDROGEOMORPHOLOGY. [Masters Thesis]. Southern Illinois University; 2017. Available from: https://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/theses/2189


University of Kentucky

2. Stephenson, Keith. MISSISSIPPI PERIOD OCCUPATIONAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER VALLEY.

Degree: 2011, University of Kentucky

Research focusing on the political economy of Mississippian mound centers in the middle Savannah River valley has prompted a reevaluation of current interpretations regarding societal complexity. I conclude the clearest expression of classic Mississippian riverine-adaptation is evident at centers immediately below the Fall Line with their political ties to chiefdom centers in the Piedmont, and especially Etowah. By contrast, those centers on the interior Coastal Plain were politically autonomous with minimal signatures in social ranking. The scale of appropriated labor and resulting level of surplus production, necessitated by upland settlement on the Aiken Plateau, fostered social contradictions making communally-oriented and decentralized societies more sustainable than hierarchical forms.

Subjects/Keywords: Chiefdom Society; Middle Mississippi Period; Savannah River Valley; Political Economy; Anthropology; Political Economy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stephenson, . K. (2011). MISSISSIPPI PERIOD OCCUPATIONAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER VALLEY. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kentucky. Retrieved from https://uknowledge.uky.edu/gradschool_diss/194

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stephenson, Keith. “MISSISSIPPI PERIOD OCCUPATIONAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER VALLEY.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kentucky. Accessed November 28, 2020. https://uknowledge.uky.edu/gradschool_diss/194.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stephenson, Keith. “MISSISSIPPI PERIOD OCCUPATIONAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER VALLEY.” 2011. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Stephenson K. MISSISSIPPI PERIOD OCCUPATIONAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER VALLEY. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kentucky; 2011. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: https://uknowledge.uky.edu/gradschool_diss/194.

Council of Science Editors:

Stephenson K. MISSISSIPPI PERIOD OCCUPATIONAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER VALLEY. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kentucky; 2011. Available from: https://uknowledge.uky.edu/gradschool_diss/194


University of Michigan

3. Livingood, Patrick C. The geographic limit of inter-polity interaction during the Mississippian: A view from the Pevey and Lowe-Steen sites on the Middle Pearl River, Mississippi.

Degree: PhD, Social Sciences, 2006, University of Michigan

Previous research in the western Gulf Coastal Plain has argued that the largest Mississippian sites were able to influence the development and complexity of neighboring polities through their ability to restrict access to esoteric goods. These studies primarily relied on comparisons of the abundance of non-local goods in burials. This dissertation builds on those studies by examining the geographic limit of such inter-polity interactions and arguing that polity size and signs of political centralization are useful means of identifying the effects of inter-polity competition. This approach utilizes a rigorous definition of polity developed by David Hally that links emic and etic definitions and builds on research contrasting large and small Mississippian polities to argue that large polities were likely pursuing different political strategies. When summarized, this dissertation argues that 100 – 125 km appears to be an important distance in inter-polity interaction in the historical record and for the study area. Most large polities occur more than this distance from each other, and this dissertation argues that this pattern is a result of the nature of inter-polity interactions among Mississippian chiefdoms. This regional analysis is possible because this dissertation is able to present data on archaeological research from two sites that were part of the same polity in the middle of the study region. The Pevey site is a nine-mound Mississippian civic-ceremonial center located on the Pearl River in Lawrence County, Mississippi and Lowe-Steen is a two-mound secondary center 18 km to the north of Pevey. This dissertation presents the archaeological research at these sites and the results of survey. Additionally, it presents a new method of using digital image analysis to analyze ceramic temper at a microscopic scale in order to develop an alternative method of characterizing paste for the ceramics from the Middle Pearl. Advisors/Committee Members: Ford, Richard I. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Chiefdoms; Geographic; Inter; Interpolity Interaction; Limit; Lowe-steen Site; Middle; Mississippi; Mississippian; Pearl River; Pevey Site; Sites; View

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Livingood, P. C. (2006). The geographic limit of inter-polity interaction during the Mississippian: A view from the Pevey and Lowe-Steen sites on the Middle Pearl River, Mississippi. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/125815

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Livingood, Patrick C. “The geographic limit of inter-polity interaction during the Mississippian: A view from the Pevey and Lowe-Steen sites on the Middle Pearl River, Mississippi.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed November 28, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/125815.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Livingood, Patrick C. “The geographic limit of inter-polity interaction during the Mississippian: A view from the Pevey and Lowe-Steen sites on the Middle Pearl River, Mississippi.” 2006. Web. 28 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Livingood PC. The geographic limit of inter-polity interaction during the Mississippian: A view from the Pevey and Lowe-Steen sites on the Middle Pearl River, Mississippi. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2006. [cited 2020 Nov 28]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/125815.

Council of Science Editors:

Livingood PC. The geographic limit of inter-polity interaction during the Mississippian: A view from the Pevey and Lowe-Steen sites on the Middle Pearl River, Mississippi. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/125815

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