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You searched for subject:(Microscale processing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing.

Degree: MASc, 2014, McMaster University

Micro-scale processing (MSP) techniques are miniaturized version of upstream and downstream conventional unit operations that are designed to accelerate the pace of bioprocess design and development. Previous ‘dead end’ filtration studies have demonstrated the usefulness of this concept for membrane filtration processes. However, these experiments were performed without stirring which is the most common strategy to control the effects of concentration polarization and fouling on filtration performance. In this work, the pressure-driven stirred conditions of a conventional stirred-cell module were integrated with a 96-well filter plate to develop a high throughput technique called ‘stirred-well filtration’ (SWF). The design allowed for up to eight constant flux filtration experiments to be conducted at once using a multi-rack programmable syringe pump and a magnetic lateral tumble stirrer. An array of pressure transducers was used to monitor the transmembrane pressure (TMP) in each well. The protein sieving behavior and fouling propensity of Omega™ ultrafiltration membranes were assessed via a combination of hydraulic permeability measurements and protein sieving tests in constant filtrate flux mode. The TMP profile during filtration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution was strongly dependent on the stirring conditions – for example the maximum TMP in the stirred wells were an average of 7.5, 3.8, and 2.6 times lower than those in the unstirred wells at filtrate fluxes of 12, 36, and 60 LMH (5, 15, and 25 μL/min) respectively. The consistency of the data across different wells for the same stirring condition was very good. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the SWF technique, the eight tests for a simple 22 factorial design-of-experiments (DOE) test with duplicates was run to evaluate the effect of solution pH and salt concentration on protein filtration. The combination of SWF with statistical methods such as DOE is shown to be an effective strategy for high-throughput optimization of membrane filtration processes.

Dissertation

Master of Applied Science (MASc)

Advisors/Committee Members: Latulippe, David, Chemical Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: Microscale processing; High-throughput testing; Downstream bioprocessing; Stirred well filtration (SWF); BSA filtration; Micromixing; Fouling test; Omega™ membrane

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kazemi, A. S. (2014). Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. “Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing.” 2014. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed February 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. “Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing.” 2014. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Kazemi AS. Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2014. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153.

Council of Science Editors:

Kazemi AS. Development of stirred well filtration as a high-throughput technique for downstream bioprocessing. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16153

2. Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. Development of High-throughput Membrane Filtration Techniques for Biological and Environmental Applications.

Degree: PhD, 2018, McMaster University

Membrane filtration processes are widely utilized across different industrial sectors for biological and environmental separations. Examples of the former are sterile filtration and protein fractionation via microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) while drinking water treatment, tertiary treatment of wastewater, water reuse and desalination via MF, UF, nanofiltration (NF) and reverse-osmosis (RO) are examples of the latter. A common misconception is that the performance of membrane separation is solely dependent on the membrane pore size, whereas a multitude of parameters including solution conditions, solute concentration, presence of specific ions, hydrodynamic conditions, membrane structure and surface properties can significantly influence the separation performance and the membrane’s fouling propensity. The conventional approach for studying filtration performance is to use a single lab- or pilot-scale module and perform numerous experiments in a sequential manner which is both time-consuming and requires large amounts of material. Alternatively, high-throughput (HT) techniques, defined as the miniaturized version of conventional unit operations which allow for multiple experiments to be run in parallel and require a small amount of sample, can be employed. There is a growing interest in the use of HT techniques to speed up the testing and optimization of membrane-based separations. In this work, different HT screening approaches are developed and utilized for the evaluation and optimization of filtration performance using flat-sheet and hollow-fiber (HF) membranes used in biological and environmental separations. The effects of various process factors were evaluated on the separation of different biomolecules by combining a HT filtration method using flat-sheet UF membranes and design-of-experiments methods. Additionally, a novel HT platform was introduced for multi-modal (constant transmembrane pressure vs. constant flux) testing of flat-sheet membranes used in bio-separations. Furthermore, the first-ever HT modules for parallel testing of HF membranes were developed for rapid fouling tests as well as extended filtration evaluation experiments. The usefulness of the modules was demonstrated by evaluating the filtration performance of different foulants under various operating conditions as well as running surface modification experiments. The techniques described herein can be employed for rapid determination of the optimal combination of conditions that result in the best filtration performance for different membrane separation applications and thus eliminate the need to perform numerous conventional lab-scale tests. Overall, more than 250 filtration tests and 350 hydraulic permeability measurements were performed and analyzed using the HT platforms developed in this thesis.

Thesis

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Membrane filtration is widely used as a key separation process in different industries. For example, microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) are used for sterilization and…

Advisors/Committee Members: Latulippe, David, Chemical Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: Membrane filtration; Ultrafiltration; Downstream bio-processing; High-throughput (HT) testing; Wastewater treatment; Hollow-fiber membranes; Humic acids; High-throughput filtration; Design-of-experiments (DOE); Process optimization; Microscale filtration; Microfluidic flow control system; Stirred well filtration; SWF; High-throughput hollow-fiber module; HT-HF; Constant TMP; Constant flux; Multi-modal filtration; Bioseparation; MMFC; Microscale parallel-structured, cross-flow filtration; MS-PS-CFF; PEG; Dextran; FITC-Dextran; BSA; DNA; IgG; α-lactalbumin; Biomolecule separation; Module hydrodynamics; Concentration polarization; Membrane fouling; Micromixing; Omega™ membrane; Microscale processing; Fouling test; PVDF membrane; Surface modification; Polydopamine; Membrane cleaning; Membrane backwashing; Sodium alginate; Polyethersulfone; PES; Hydraulic permeability; Membrane permeability; ZeeWeed® membrane; Filtration ionic strength; Filtration pH; Solution conditions; Water treatment; Environmental separations; Biological separations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kazemi, A. S. (2018). Development of High-throughput Membrane Filtration Techniques for Biological and Environmental Applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23404

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. “Development of High-throughput Membrane Filtration Techniques for Biological and Environmental Applications.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed February 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23404.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kazemi, Amir Sadegh. “Development of High-throughput Membrane Filtration Techniques for Biological and Environmental Applications.” 2018. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Kazemi AS. Development of High-throughput Membrane Filtration Techniques for Biological and Environmental Applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2018. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23404.

Council of Science Editors:

Kazemi AS. Development of High-throughput Membrane Filtration Techniques for Biological and Environmental Applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/23404


Georgia Tech

3. Saxena, Shubham. Nanolithography on thin films using heated atomic force microscope cantilevers.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2006, Georgia Tech

Nanotechnology is expected to play a major role in many technology areas including electronics, materials, and defense. One of the most popular tools for nanoscale surface analysis is the atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM can be used for surface manipulation along with surface imaging. The primary motivation for this research is to demonstrate AFM-based lithography on thin films using cantilevers with integrated heaters. These thermal cantilevers can control the temperature at the end of the tip, and hence they can be used for local in-situ thermal analysis. This research directly addresses applications like nanoscale electrical circuit fabrication/repair and thermal analysis of thin-films. In this study, an investigation was performed on two thin-film materials. One of them is co-polycarbonate, a variant of a polymer named polycarbonate, and the other is an energetic material called pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Experimental methods involved in the lithography process are discussed, and the results of lithographic experiments performed on co-polycarbonate and PETN are reported. Effects of dominant parameters during lithography experiments like time, temperature, and force are investigated. Results of simulation of the interface temperature between thermal cantilever tip and thin film surface, at the beginning of the lithography process, are also reported. Advisors/Committee Members: King, William Paul (Committee Chair), Henderson, Clifford L (Committee Co-Chair), Gall, Ken (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Characterization; Deflection; Setpoint; Grain rearrangement; Array; Precise positioning; Metrology; Explosion; Explosives; Data storage; Material; Image processing; Slow scan disabled; Temperature; Tip; Local; In-situ; Nanoscale; Electrical circuit fabrication; Repair; Co-polycarbonate; Polymers; Polycarbonates; Energetic materials; PETN; Simulation; Interface; Nano-manufacturing; Experiment; Calibration; Raman; Frequency; Deflagration; Decomposition; Detonation; Build up; Pile-up; End capped; End capping; Cross linked; Cross-linked; Conductivity; Microscale; MEMS; Microcantilever; NEMS; DPN; tDPN; Silicon; Glass; Peak; InVOLS; Manipulation; AFM; Atomic force microscope; Defense; Nanoscale; Surface; Stiffness; Force; Scan size; Thermal cantilevers; Imaging; Lithography; Nanolithography; Thin films; Cantilevers; Heaters; Technology; Nanotechnology; Scan velocity; Scan rate; Bake; Anneal; Pentaerythritol tetranitrate; Thin films Thermal properties; Atomic force microscopy; Microlithography; Nanotechnology; Surfaces (Technology) Analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Saxena, S. (2006). Nanolithography on thin films using heated atomic force microscope cantilevers. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14071

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Saxena, Shubham. “Nanolithography on thin films using heated atomic force microscope cantilevers.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed February 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14071.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Saxena, Shubham. “Nanolithography on thin films using heated atomic force microscope cantilevers.” 2006. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Saxena S. Nanolithography on thin films using heated atomic force microscope cantilevers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14071.

Council of Science Editors:

Saxena S. Nanolithography on thin films using heated atomic force microscope cantilevers. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/14071

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