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You searched for subject:(Medicine prices). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Nguyen, Tuan Anh. Medicine prices and pricing policies in Vietnam.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2011, University of New South Wales

Availability of affordable medicines is one precondition to realizing the fundamental human right of access to essential healthcare. Although Vietnam is progressing well with several health-related targets of the Millennium Development Goals being achieved ahead of time, attaining equitable access to affordable medicines remains problematic. In this thesis, a mixed-method approach was adopted in the analysis of medicine prices and polices. The literature was reviewed, followed by an analysis of Vietnam’s pharmaceutical market and legislation. A quantitative study of medicine prices, and a qualitative study on how and why high, unaffordable prices occurred, were conducted. The findings were synthesized to form policy recommendations. The studies demonstrated that medicine prices in Vietnam were unreasonably high. Adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity in 2005, prices in the public sector were 46.58 times the international reference price for innovator-brand medicines and 11.41 times for the lowest-priced generic equivalents. Monopoly of supply was an important cause of high innovator-brand prices. More complex, intrinsic features of Vietnam’s healthcare system were also reported by key stakeholders as driving up prices. Economic survival pressures, in an imperfectly competitive market, were said to force both pharmaceutical companies and prescribers to be inextricably linked financially. Ethics and personal values however did influence prescribers’ behaviour and their response to corrupt procedures. Overall, intractable, systemic features contributing to high prices included unrealistic low salaries for prescribers, poor economies of scale in domestic production, inefficiencies in the local distribution network, malfunctioning pricing policies and a general lack of transparency and accountability in administrative procedures. A range of policy measures and changes are required to improve access to medicines in Vietnam. Short-term recommendations include amendments to pharmaceutical policies, with better enforcement of current regulations. Medium-term measures include the public health insurance system taking an active role in price setting, pooling procurement through a national tendering procurement system and reform of the domestic market through rationalization with appropriate capital and technological investment to achieve improved efficiencies and economies of scale. Longer-term goals include health system improvements to address poor governance, low remuneration of prescribers, with additional measures to limit the scope for corrupt practices. Advisors/Committee Members: Knight, Rosemary, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Mant, Andrea, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Cao, Quang Minh, Ministry of Health of Vietnam, Razee, Husna, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Vietnam; Medicine prices; Medicine pricing policies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nguyen, T. A. (2011). Medicine prices and pricing policies in Vietnam. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51324 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10005/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nguyen, Tuan Anh. “Medicine prices and pricing policies in Vietnam.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51324 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10005/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nguyen, Tuan Anh. “Medicine prices and pricing policies in Vietnam.” 2011. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nguyen TA. Medicine prices and pricing policies in Vietnam. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51324 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10005/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Nguyen TA. Medicine prices and pricing policies in Vietnam. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51324 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10005/SOURCE02?view=true


University of the Western Cape

2. Rassa, Adam Omary. A cost analysis of medicine donation programs to Tanzania’s neglected tropical diseases control program .

Degree: 2019, University of the Western Cape

Overreliance on donor supported health programs has crippled many African countries and there is inadequate long-term planning on the future sustainability of health systems. In the age of uncertainty in global politics and global economy, the future of these donor funded programs is also uncertain. It is imperative for African nations to begin to take responsibility for their health programs. In as much as the name “donation” suggests that something is given free of charge, in actual sense this may not be the case due to hidden costs attached. In medicine access, the hidden costs are the supply chain costs including cost for clearance, storage and distribution of such medicines which are charged as a percentage of claimed commodity costs on donors’ or suppliers’ invoices. Since the medicines donated are in originators’ brands, the invoiced prices are high thus supply chain costs are high as well. In some cases, it is thought that the hidden costs are higher than the cost of medicines had they been sourced locally as generics. The aim of this research was to assess and determine the hidden supply chain costs associated with the four medicine donation programs supporting the Tanzania Neglected Tropical Diseases Program and inform policy decision on optimal financing options for the program Methodology The cost analysis of the two options was undertaken from a payers’ perspective which in this case is the Government of Tanzania (Ministry of Health). Data was collected on both product and supply chain cost drivers incurred in the medicine donation programs from July 2014 to June 2017. Costs of the current mechanism were obtained from the program’s quantification reports and transaction data for the study period. Transactional data was obtained from shipment documents including sales invoices, parking list, proof of delivery and goods receiving notes were evaluated for actual quantities shipped, commodity prices and other supply chain cost. To verify the actual supply chain cost charged by the program, both the official bills from Medical Stores Department (MSD) to the program and the electronic bills available at MSD electronic database covering the study period were studied. Advisors/Committee Members: Tabana, Hanani (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cost analysis; Donation programs; Service fee; Medicine prices; Generic medicines

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rassa, A. O. (2019). A cost analysis of medicine donation programs to Tanzania’s neglected tropical diseases control program . (Thesis). University of the Western Cape. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11394/7055

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rassa, Adam Omary. “A cost analysis of medicine donation programs to Tanzania’s neglected tropical diseases control program .” 2019. Thesis, University of the Western Cape. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11394/7055.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rassa, Adam Omary. “A cost analysis of medicine donation programs to Tanzania’s neglected tropical diseases control program .” 2019. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Rassa AO. A cost analysis of medicine donation programs to Tanzania’s neglected tropical diseases control program . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of the Western Cape; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11394/7055.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rassa AO. A cost analysis of medicine donation programs to Tanzania’s neglected tropical diseases control program . [Thesis]. University of the Western Cape; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11394/7055

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.