Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Medication alerts). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Houston

1. Bhakta, Sunny B. A Systematic Approach to Optimize Electronic Health Record Medication Alerts in a Health-System.

Degree: MS, Pharmacy Leadership & Administration, 2018, University of Houston

Purpose: Limited literature evaluates a sustainable process for optimization of medication alerts when implementing a new electronic health record (EHR) technology with clinical decision support (CDS) capabilities. This study aimed to provide health-system enterprises with a systematic approach to optimize medication alerts with new EHR technology and evaluate the effect of strategic interventions to improve the effectiveness of medication related CDS. Methods: An 81 week quasi-experimental study was conducted to evaluate the impact of interventions made to medication related CDS alerts by a multi-disciplinary committee. The primary endpoint was weekly modification and acknowledgement rates of medication alerts after drug-drug interaction reclassification. Secondary endpoints included weekly modification and acknowledgement rates of drug-drug interaction and duplicate therapy alerts, pharmacist and provider modification and acknowledgment rates in response to drug alerts, and monthly number of alerts per 100 medication orders. Data on alert and warning frequency, severity, and response type were analyzed before and after committee interventions to determine the impact of committee led interventions. Interrupted time series regression analysis was utilized to assess primary and secondary endpoints over the study time period. Results: After reclassification of drug-drug interactions, a significant increase in weekly provider modification and acknowledgement rates occurred (2.06 ± 0.18%, p <0.001; 1.49 ± 0.25%, p<0.001). Total alerts per 100 medication orders significantly decreased after drug-drug interaction classification (Pre-intervention median: 88.4 vs Post-intervention 63.1, p=0.017). Conclusion: Committee led interventions to drug-drug interactions facilitated an overall increase in both medication alert acknowledgement and modification rates, as well as an overall reduction in the total quantity of generated alerts. Advisors/Committee Members: Garey, Kevin W. (advisor), Colavecchia, Anthony C. (committee member), Varkey, Divya A. (committee member), Haines, Linda (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Medication alerts; Clinical decision support

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bhakta, S. B. (2018). A Systematic Approach to Optimize Electronic Health Record Medication Alerts in a Health-System. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3079

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bhakta, Sunny B. “A Systematic Approach to Optimize Electronic Health Record Medication Alerts in a Health-System.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed April 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3079.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bhakta, Sunny B. “A Systematic Approach to Optimize Electronic Health Record Medication Alerts in a Health-System.” 2018. Web. 10 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Bhakta SB. A Systematic Approach to Optimize Electronic Health Record Medication Alerts in a Health-System. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3079.

Council of Science Editors:

Bhakta SB. A Systematic Approach to Optimize Electronic Health Record Medication Alerts in a Health-System. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3079

2. Lin, Pei J. Effect of Electronic Alerts on Nurses' Intentions to Perform Medication Education: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior.

Degree: MS, Pharmacy Leadership & Administration, 2018, University of Houston

PURPOSE: Inadequate education about medications can increase the risk of medication-related errors. The national average of patients who reported that staff “Always” explained about medicines before giving it to them” was 65% for measurement period from 10/01/2015 to 09/30/2016. A multi-disciplinary team consisting of pharmacists, nurses, and informaticists developed an innovative solution utilizing electronic alerts to facilitate medication education. The authors of this study aim to understand the motivational factors that may influence nurses’ behavioral intentions to perform medication education to patients at the bedside and determine the effect of the electronic alerts on nurses’ intentions to perform medication education. METHODS: This pre-post questionnaire study was conducted at a 907-bed academic medical center. The survey was developed based upon a framework called, the theory of planned behavior, to examine motivational factors that may influence nurses’ intention to perform medication education. The study sample composed of 150 nurses working on the six pre-designated pilot units for medication education alerts. The medication education alerts were built in the form of BestPractice Advisories (BPA) available within the electronic health system. An elicitation study was arranged in focus groups to develop the questionnaire that was given to nurses before and after the implementation of the medication education alerts. Descriptive statistics, logistic and multivariate regression analyses were used to achieve the objectives of this study. RESULTS: 95 questionnaires were collected in the pre-BPA group and 98 questionnaires were collected in the post-BPA group. Attitude and subjective norm were significantly correlated with nurses’ intentions to perform medication education. After the implementation of medication education BPAs, there was a significant increase on the control beliefs and perceived power to perform medication education. CONCLUSION: The theory of planned behavioral was useful in understanding the motivational factors that may influence nurses to perform medication education. Interventions that address key influential factors may be helpful in driving medication education initiatives. Advisors/Committee Members: Varkey, Divya A. (advisor), Abughosh, Susan M. (committee member), Varkey, Alex C. (committee member), Colavecchia, Anthony C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Electronic; Alerts; Medication; Education; Theory; Planned; Behaviors

…Design and implement electronic alerts displayed to nurses at the point of medication… …electronic alerts on nurses’ intentions to perform medication education. Methods Study Design and… …of electronic alerts to nurses at the point of medication administration, and… …alerts to nurses at the point of medication administration to help improve the medication… …education BPAs. The medication education electronic alerts were designed to prompt nurses to… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lin, P. J. (2018). Effect of Electronic Alerts on Nurses' Intentions to Perform Medication Education: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior. (Masters Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3085

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lin, Pei J. “Effect of Electronic Alerts on Nurses' Intentions to Perform Medication Education: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed April 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3085.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lin, Pei J. “Effect of Electronic Alerts on Nurses' Intentions to Perform Medication Education: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior.” 2018. Web. 10 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Lin PJ. Effect of Electronic Alerts on Nurses' Intentions to Perform Medication Education: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Houston; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3085.

Council of Science Editors:

Lin PJ. Effect of Electronic Alerts on Nurses' Intentions to Perform Medication Education: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior. [Masters Thesis]. University of Houston; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/3085

.