Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Medical Advancement). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Choi, Andrew Young-Joon. Pneumatic Delivery of Untethered Micro-Surgical Tools.

Degree: 2014, Johns Hopkins University

Colorectal cancer is an extremely prevalent disease within the US with high morbidity rates, which can be significantly reduced with early detection and early treatment. However, many patients are hesitant to get regular colorectal cancer screenings, and random biopsy sampling may miss small cancerous lesions. To address this issue, medical technology has improved to make procedures less invasive and yield better results with less pain and discomfort. Surgical innovations such as natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), uses natural orifices instead of incisions to gain access inside the body for surgery. Capsular endoscopes offer an ingestible alternative to colonoscopies. Untethered, thermally actuated microgrippers, which are smaller than a millimeter in diameter, have performed successful in vivo biopsies of hard to reach areas such as the bile duct, and have the potential to mass sample the gastrointestinal tract for cancer screening while minimizing tissue damage. However, it was observed that many microgrippers had difficulty attaching to gastrointestinal tissue. I have performed experiments to determine success rates of microgrippers in a random biopsy environment, assessed appropriate pressure ranges to deliver microgrippers to preserve microgripper quality during pneumatic transport, and tested pneumatically delivered microgrippers on porcine gastrointestinal tissue with good results. A pressure of 10 psi resulted in 75.51 ± 5.56% gripper viability, which we determined to be the maximum pressure for this setup due to excessive microgripper breakage beyond that pressure. Microgrippers fired onto gastrointestinal tissue in an aqueous environment with a pressure of 8 psi attached at a rate of 65.03 ± 6.87% after an external flow of 19 mL/min versus 20.44 ± 1.95% at 0 psi after flow, showing over a 3-fold increase in gripping attachment with pneumatic delivery. In all experiments, microgrippers which were fired onto tissue with an input pressure performed better than without pressure. Pneumatic delivery also showed significant improvements in vertically oriented tissue adhesion compared to previous methods of deployment. My results suggest that the introduction of pneumatics to accelerate the microgrippers to the target at higher speeds has a strong positive impact on microgripper attachment rates. Advisors/Committee Members: Gracias, David H (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Microgrippers; Micro; Nano; Surgery; Biopsy; Pneumatic; Gastrointestinal; Colon; Gastric; Attachment; Pressure; Accelerate; Minimally; Invasive; Endoscope; Medical; Procedure; Enhance; Advancement; Improvement; Improve; Colon cancer; Cancer

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Choi, A. Y. (2014). Pneumatic Delivery of Untethered Micro-Surgical Tools. (Thesis). Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved from http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37111

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Choi, Andrew Young-Joon. “Pneumatic Delivery of Untethered Micro-Surgical Tools.” 2014. Thesis, Johns Hopkins University. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37111.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Choi, Andrew Young-Joon. “Pneumatic Delivery of Untethered Micro-Surgical Tools.” 2014. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Choi AY. Pneumatic Delivery of Untethered Micro-Surgical Tools. [Internet] [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37111.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Choi AY. Pneumatic Delivery of Untethered Micro-Surgical Tools. [Thesis]. Johns Hopkins University; 2014. Available from: http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/37111

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Doyle Scharff, Maureen. Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay.

Degree: PhD, Educational Administration (Education), 2017, Ohio University

Challenges with institutional fit, burnout, overall job satisfaction and retention of female faculty in medical schools continue to persist. Fueling much of this is the omnipresent disparities between male and female faculty in senior and leadership positions, leaving junior female faculty little hope for advancement. Faculty development programs that include formal mentoring which can influence perception of culture have been shown to improve job satisfaction of female faculty, thus improving retention of this important resource. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to evaluate similarities and differences between female faculty members in medical schools who plan to stay employed at their current institution and those who plan to leave or are undecided. Personal and workplace status characteristics, as well as perception of job satisfaction, culture, career advancement opportunities, and participation in a formal mentoring program were the specific attributes studied. In addition, a binomial logistic regression was conducted to assess the predictive value of one or more of these variables with a goal of determining whether or not participation in a formal mentoring program can predict intent to stay.Results of the analysis showed statistically significant differences between female faculty who intend to stay and those who plan to leave their institution or are undecided. The model, including perception of global job satisfaction, interpersonal culture (fit/collegiality) and equal opportunity for all faculty members, coupled with participation in a formal mentoring program, was statistically significant and was able to predict intent to stay. Advisors/Committee Members: Pillay, Yegan (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Higher Education; Medicine; Organization Theory; Mentoring; Female Faculty; Medical Schools; Job Satisfaction; Culture; Career Advancement

…of medical school faculty (Pololi et al., 2002). When studying career advancement… …opportunities for advancement, and formal mentoring programs in a medical school setting and female… …39 Organizational Culture and Medical Schools… …48 Career Advancement… …65 Mentoring and medical school faculty… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Doyle Scharff, M. (2017). Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay. (Doctoral Dissertation). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1490617400636294

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Doyle Scharff, Maureen. “Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Ohio University. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1490617400636294.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Doyle Scharff, Maureen. “Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Doyle Scharff M. Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Ohio University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1490617400636294.

Council of Science Editors:

Doyle Scharff M. Female Faculty Members in Medical Schools: An Exploratory Analysis of the Impact of Perception of Job Satisfaction, Culture, Opportunities for Advancement, and Formal Mentoring on Intent to Stay. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Ohio University; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1490617400636294


Virginia Commonwealth University

3. Lucas, D. Pulane. Disruptive Transformations in Health Care: Technological Innovation and the Acute Care General Hospital.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy & Administration, 2013, Virginia Commonwealth University

Advances in medical technology have altered the need for certain types of surgery to be performed in traditional inpatient hospital settings. Less invasive surgical procedures allow a growing number of medical treatments to take place on an outpatient basis. Hospitals face growing competition from ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). The competitive threats posed by ASCs are important, given that inpatient surgery has been the cornerstone of hospital services for over a century. Additional research is needed to understand how surgical volume shifts between and within acute care general hospitals (ACGHs) and ASCs. This study investigates how medical technology within the hospital industry is changing medical services delivery. The main purposes of this study are to (1) test Clayton M. Christensen’s theory of disruptive innovation in health care, and (2) examine the effects of disruptive innovation on appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and bariatric surgery (ACBS) utilization. Disruptive innovation theory contends that advanced technology combined with innovative business models—located outside of traditional product markets or delivery systems—will produce simplified, quality products and services at lower costs with broader accessibility. Consequently, new markets will emerge, and conventional industry leaders will experience a loss of market share to “non-traditional” new entrants into the marketplace. The underlying assumption of this work is that ASCs (innovative business models) have adopted laparoscopy (innovative technology) and their unification has initiated disruptive innovation within the hospital industry. The disruptive effects have spawned shifts in surgical volumes from open to laparoscopic procedures, from inpatient to ambulatory settings, and from hospitals to ASCs. The research hypothesizes that: (1) there will be larger increases in the percentage of laparoscopic ACBS performed than open ACBS procedures; (2) ambulatory ACBS will experience larger percent increases than inpatient ACBS procedures; and (3) ASCs will experience larger percent increases than ACGHs. The study tracks the utilization of open, laparoscopic, inpatient and ambulatory ACBS. The research questions that guide the inquiry are: 1. How has ACBS utilization changed over this time? 2. Do ACGHs and ASCs differ in the utilization of ACBS? 3. How do states differ in the utilization of ACBS? 4. Do study findings support disruptive innovation theory in the hospital industry? The quantitative study employs a panel design using hospital discharge data from 2004 and 2009. The unit of analysis is the facility. The sampling frame is comprised of ACGHs and ASCs in Florida and Wisconsin. The study employs exploratory and confirmatory data analysis. This work finds that disruptive innovation theory is an effective model for assessing the hospital industry. The model provides a useful framework for analyzing the interplay between ACGHs and ASCs. While study findings did not support the stated hypotheses, the impact of government interventions into… Advisors/Committee Members: Carl F. Ameringer, Roice D. Luke, Wally R. Smith, I-Shian Suen.

Subjects/Keywords: Disruptive; Disruptive Innovation Theory; Disruptive Transformations; Disruptive Innovation; Innovation; Technology; Technological Innovation; Medical Innovation; Medical Technology; Medical Advancement; Laparoscopy; Laparoscopic Surgery; open surgery; appendectomy; cholecystectomy; bariatric surgery; weight loss surgery; appendectomies; cholecystectomies; inpatient; outpatient; ambulatory; ambulatory surgery; ambulatory surgery center; acute care general hospital; hospital; acute care hospital; general hospital; health care; healthcare; hospital industry; health care industry; Clayton Christensen; Clayton M Christensen; Michael Porter; Harvard Business School; Virginia Commonwealth University; Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; CMS; Health policy; public policy; public administration; organizational theory; organization theory; Population Ecology Theory; Competitive Strategy; policy analysis; John Kimberly; Organization Size; Structural Inertia; liability of smallness; health spending; health care cost; specialty medical facility; open system; niche width dynamic; outpatient department; technology shift; surgical setting; surgical setting shift; medical facility shift; substitution threat; health system; system level analysis; Ecological Approach; hospital trends; ambulatory surgery trends; reimbursement rate; Medicare; CMS coverage decision; P J DiMaggio; DiMaggio and Powell; w w Powell; Hannan and Freeman; M T Hannan; Organizational change; minimally invasive surgery; less invasive surgery; Prospective Payment System; Outpatient Prospective Payment System; entreprenuerial physician; health care organization; health care management; Roice Luke; Carl Ameringer; new technology; surgical utilization; elective surgery; Medicare Payment Advisory Commission; MedPAC; coverage decision; trends in surgery; abdominal surgery; surgical variation; physician-owned; physician ownership; physician autonomy; outpatient clinic; utilization trends; unnecessary surgery; Pfeffer Salancik; technology diffusion; redefining health care; interdisciplinary research; health care delivery; panel design; diffusion of hospital technology; state variation; regional variation; local health care market; government intervention; medical facility; health care capacity; focused factory; advances in health care; physician organization relationship; hospital competition; medical specialization; hospital expansion; medical arms race; integrated care; integrated health system; J E Wennberg; health care transformation; reimbursement scheme; surgical volume; Florida; Wisconsin; policy making; health policy analysis; competitive dynamics; center of excellence; intervening factor; service line competition; service-line competition; surgical reimbursement; innovative business model; innovative technology; environmental influence; established firm; new market entrant; patient safety; sophisticated technology; Harvard Divinity School; Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs; Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration; Social and Behavioral Sciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lucas, D. P. (2013). Disruptive Transformations in Health Care: Technological Innovation and the Acute Care General Hospital. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/2996

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lucas, D Pulane. “Disruptive Transformations in Health Care: Technological Innovation and the Acute Care General Hospital.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/2996.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lucas, D Pulane. “Disruptive Transformations in Health Care: Technological Innovation and the Acute Care General Hospital.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Lucas DP. Disruptive Transformations in Health Care: Technological Innovation and the Acute Care General Hospital. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/2996.

Council of Science Editors:

Lucas DP. Disruptive Transformations in Health Care: Technological Innovation and the Acute Care General Hospital. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2013. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/2996

.