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You searched for subject:(Masculinity Kenya). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

1. Simiyu, Catherine Kituko. An investigation into masculine-atypical behaviour : a study among Moi university students Western Kenya.

Degree: DEd, Faculty of Education, 2007, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

We are presented with a situation in which ‘the male identity is a fragile and tentative thing with no secure anchorage in the contemporary world’ (Brittan, 1989:3). However, empirical evidence surrounding the commonly perceived contemporary crisis of masculinity fails to support any overall crisis of masculinity thesis (Edwards, 2006:16). Instead, the different perceptions of the crisis tend to rest on at least one of the three propositions pointed out by Edwards (2006:17): Firstly; masculinity as a set of values, practices or dispositions may be suffering a crisis in so far as it is being undermined and devalued, or, moreover that masculinity per see is now to a greater or lesser degree equated with a series of negative rather than positive associations and connotations. Secondly; masculinity may be in crisis due to its perceived tendency to implore into femininity, whether through an undermining of any gender role distinctions or through feminization of some forms of masculinity as, for example, in the case of the rise of contemporary consumerist, fashion conscious or sexually uncertain masculinities such as metrosexuality. Thirdly, the crisis of masculinity may relate to the sense that masculinity in terms of the male sex role is itself ipso facto crisis-inducing. In this sense, masculinity is not in crisis, it is crisis. This study was based on the second proposition. In the patriarchal Kenyan society where gender roles are fairly traditional, and the male person perceived superior to the female and male things valued above female things, the aspect of feminization of masculinity is not just new but indeed strange. This investigation was intended to find explanations for the feminizing behaviour by males. The sex role paradigm developed in the 1970s explains acquisition of masculinity through socialization, sex role learning and social control. These mainstream theories of learning gender were explored in the assumption that they form the basis for the contemporary theories, and further, although much had changed with the times, a large part of the society still perceived gender roles from this traditional viewpoint. The masculine crisis theory and the constructionist views of gender constituted the theoretical framework of the study. This was due to the researcher’s acknowledgement that individuals were active participants in the construction of their own gender identity, and that there was likelihood for the individuals to deviate from the social expectations of what masculinity means and should be. As a result they could construct a masculinity that did not reflect normality, hence portraying a crisis. Data relating to the respondents’ perception of and reasons for feminine behaviour among young male adults was gathered from young males, young females, and both male and female parents through questionnaire and interview methods. Information about the home environment of the respondents was also necessary to help explore environmental factors that contribute to gender construction. In addition, observation was… Advisors/Committee Members: Van Rensburg, Susan Prof.

Subjects/Keywords: Sex role  – Kenya; Masculinity  – Kenya

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Simiyu, C. K. (2007). An investigation into masculine-atypical behaviour : a study among Moi university students Western Kenya. (Doctoral Dissertation). Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10948/851

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Simiyu, Catherine Kituko. “An investigation into masculine-atypical behaviour : a study among Moi university students Western Kenya.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10948/851.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Simiyu, Catherine Kituko. “An investigation into masculine-atypical behaviour : a study among Moi university students Western Kenya.” 2007. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Simiyu CK. An investigation into masculine-atypical behaviour : a study among Moi university students Western Kenya. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; 2007. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10948/851.

Council of Science Editors:

Simiyu CK. An investigation into masculine-atypical behaviour : a study among Moi university students Western Kenya. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10948/851


Uppsala University

2. Essner, Ida. More than a technical issue for women in science : A contradictory normative reality at the University of Nairobi.

Degree: Social and Economic Geography, 2016, Uppsala University

Kenyan women carry a lot of pressure from cultural expectations and norms; there are also a lot of prejudices regarding what women are supposed to do. At the University of Nairobi, Kenya, women in technical educations are a clear minority. This thesis aims to illuminate the obstacles women in science face when they pursue higher educations. By illuminating the obstacles the thesis hopes to answer why there are fewer women than men in higher educational levels who choose science. The study has been conducted as a field study at the University of Nairobi with interviews and focus groups. The interviews were performed with men, women, employees and students to get a broad perspective on how everyone viewed the situation of women in science. The focus groups focused more on the women’s own experiences of being in the technical field. The empirical data has been analysed using theories regarding social constructions, hegemonic masculinity, gender equality and equity. Factors that the thesis concludes to hinder women to pursue science and technology are cultural expectation, the fact that science is considered to be masculine subjects reserved for men. There are also common that early childbirth hinder women from pursuing higher levels in the academia. 

Subjects/Keywords: Gender balance; gender equality and equity; women in science; technology; social constructions; hegemonic masculinity; University of Nairobi; Kenya

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Essner, I. (2016). More than a technical issue for women in science : A contradictory normative reality at the University of Nairobi. (Thesis). Uppsala University. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297592

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Essner, Ida. “More than a technical issue for women in science : A contradictory normative reality at the University of Nairobi.” 2016. Thesis, Uppsala University. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297592.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Essner, Ida. “More than a technical issue for women in science : A contradictory normative reality at the University of Nairobi.” 2016. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Essner I. More than a technical issue for women in science : A contradictory normative reality at the University of Nairobi. [Internet] [Thesis]. Uppsala University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297592.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Essner I. More than a technical issue for women in science : A contradictory normative reality at the University of Nairobi. [Thesis]. Uppsala University; 2016. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297592

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

3. Murimi, Wanjira. Mothering a nation : the gendered memory of Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion.

Degree: MA, Women's and Gender Studies, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

This paper approaches fiction as a site of gendered history and memory and presents two pieces of literature by Kenyan authors - Passbook Number F.47927 by Muthoni Likimani and The Trial of Dedan Kimathi by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o and Micere Githae Mugo - as examples of countermemory production that disrupt dominant and colonially and post-colonially perpetuated narratives of Kenya's fight for independence within the context of the Mau Mau uprisings. I assert that historical fiction can be a medium of challenge and disruption of hegemonically formed reports of history, reweaving into the tapestry of national memory voices forgotten or excised. I posit that this contestation of history and memory through countermemory can be an ethical and feminist project. However, countermemory, much like the history and memory it challenges, does not exist in a vacuum, and is subject to structures of power that may result in its being participant and enacting of oppressive power. Using gender as a lens, I elucidate the ways in which both these pieces participate in and challenge heteropatriarchal notions of manhood and womanhood as resistance strategies for nation building. Advisors/Committee Members: Richardson, Matt, 1969- (advisor), Livermon, Xavier (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: History; Memory; Mau Mau; Colonialism; Feminism; Gender studies; Sexuality; Manhood; Masculinity; Mothering; National memory; Nation-building; Kenya; Queer studies; East Africa; African feminism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Murimi, W. (2015). Mothering a nation : the gendered memory of Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32145

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murimi, Wanjira. “Mothering a nation : the gendered memory of Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32145.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murimi, Wanjira. “Mothering a nation : the gendered memory of Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion.” 2015. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Murimi W. Mothering a nation : the gendered memory of Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32145.

Council of Science Editors:

Murimi W. Mothering a nation : the gendered memory of Kenya’s Mau Mau rebellion. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32145

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