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Vanderbilt University

1. Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie Louise. Faith in My Bones: An Exercise in Ethnographic Theology.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2011, Vanderbilt University

In this dissertation, I endeavor to bring to life Kathryn Tanner’s way of framing theology as a cultural practice within which ad hoc, context specific modes of Christian discourse (everyday theologies) and more specialized, coherent, systematic modes (academic theologies) compete and cooperate with each other. To bring this model to life in practice, I develop a form of self-implicated ethnography, grounded in the reflexive ethnographic methods of Pierre Bourdieu and Loïc Wacquant. This self-implicated form of ethnography offers a complementary alternative to the traditional ethnographic modes of participant observation that have typically been used by theologians. In particular, I contrast my theological ethnographic methods with those employed by Mary McClintock Fulkerson. The form of self-implicated ethnography I develop here deployed a loose, performative integration of my own competing and cohering roles as both minister and academic theologian within my community of study (First Baptist Church, Nashville). Specifically, in order to perform this loose integration of my competing and cohering roles, my fieldwork primarily consisted in teaching two adult education theology courses: “Topics in Theology: Jesus Christ and Salvation” and “Topics in Theology: God as Trinity.” By teaching these two courses, I sought to guide a process by which everyday and academic theologies were brought together in a shared conversational process. And this conversational process was comprised of a community of people speaking various theological fluencies in order to pursue wisdom together. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul DeHart (committee member), Ted A. Smith (committee member), Graham Reside (committee member), John Thatamanil (committee member), Ellen T. Armour (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Pierre Bourdieu; Loic Wacquant; Mary McClintock Fulkerson; Kathryn Tanner; ecclesiology; Baptist Studies; adult education; Southern Baptist; identity; agency; habitus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wigg-Stevenson, N. L. (2011). Faith in My Bones: An Exercise in Ethnographic Theology. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13377

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie Louise. “Faith in My Bones: An Exercise in Ethnographic Theology.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13377.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie Louise. “Faith in My Bones: An Exercise in Ethnographic Theology.” 2011. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wigg-Stevenson NL. Faith in My Bones: An Exercise in Ethnographic Theology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13377.

Council of Science Editors:

Wigg-Stevenson NL. Faith in My Bones: An Exercise in Ethnographic Theology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13377

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