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You searched for subject:(Marriage Namibia). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

1. Kavari, Elizabeth Ikka Tjipetekera. The impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child in Omaheke Region, Namibia.

Degree: Faculty of Business and Economic Sciences, 2013, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

One of the basic challenges that faces Namibian society as it emerges from colonial times is the issue of inequality and the oppression of women and girls. The San girl-child is no exception in this regard. San women in Namibia are subject to low socio- economic status and the poorest rates of formal education. San girls who enrolled at primary school hardly make it to secondary schools because of their significantly high dropout rate. This is prevalent among girls in particular as a result of early pregnancies, marriages and other related factors. The practice of early marriage is still prevalent, despite the Namibian government’s efforts to address the issues of inequality and oppression of women. For example, article 10 of the Namibian Constitution that stipulates that all persons are equal before the law. It also prohibits any discrimination on ground of sex, race etc. Moreover, in spite of the adoption of some National Gender legal Frameworks and the signing of various regional and international gender instruments, barriers to gender equality, equity and education attainment for the San girl child remain in place. However, in Namibia as in many developing countries researches onto early marriage has largely been neglected and data on various aspects of early marriage is minimal. Hence, the study aimed to shed light on the impact of early marriages on the education attainment of the San-girl child in particular as well as to draw the attention of policymaker and the Omaheke region community attention tothese harmful traditional and socio- economic practices, such as early marriage. For my study on the perceptions of selected respondents of the impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child, I used aqualitative research approach and employed a semi-structured interview technique as my main data collection tool. The study revealed that early marriage impacts negatively on the education attainment of the San girl-child and that this undermines the status of San girls and constitutes a barrier to gender equality and equity attainment in their lives.

Subjects/Keywords: Women  – Namibia; Marriage  – Namibia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kavari, E. I. T. (2013). The impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child in Omaheke Region, Namibia. (Thesis). Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10948/d1020052

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kavari, Elizabeth Ikka Tjipetekera. “The impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child in Omaheke Region, Namibia.” 2013. Thesis, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10948/d1020052.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kavari, Elizabeth Ikka Tjipetekera. “The impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child in Omaheke Region, Namibia.” 2013. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Kavari EIT. The impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child in Omaheke Region, Namibia. [Internet] [Thesis]. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10948/d1020052.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kavari EIT. The impact of early marriage on the education attainment of the San-girl child in Omaheke Region, Namibia. [Thesis]. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10948/d1020052

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Namibia

2. Pazvakawambwa, L. Multivariate statistical modelling of family formation processes among women in Namibia .

Degree: 2015, University of Namibia

Family formation is a significant event in life-course of individuals. Many studies have revealed shifts in demographic processes including child-bearing patterns, age at sexual debut and first marriage, and marital status over the years. While there have been numerous studies in demographic processes in specific populations, very few studies have focused on family formation processes, and little or no quantitative research has been conducted on the distribution and dynamics and determinants of family formation in Namibia. This study employed a cross-sectional retrospective mixed methods design to achieve various objectives namely: to examine emerging marital patterns and trends in Namibia since attaining its independence in 1990; to analyze the hazards of first marriage and sexual debut and determinants of age at first marriage and sexual debut ; to establish factors associated with non-marital fertility; to examine perceptions of women regarding key union principles and values on matters of divorce, cohabiting, widowhood, polygamy, sex before and outside marriage based on a qualitative study; and to come up with family formation recommendations to guide policy and also pave way for further research. The study used data from the Namibia 1992 to 2006/7 DHS and from focus group discussions, which gave in-depth understanding on perceptions on family formation processes. Trend analysis, binary and multinomial logistic regression models were used to model the patterns and determinants of marital status. Discrete time hazard models through Bayesian Structured Additive Regression (STAR) approach were used to estimate the hazards of a woman’s sexual debut and first marriage. The Hurdle Logit Negative Binomial (HLNB) regression model was used to model non-marital fertility. Findings indicated a general change away from marriage, with a shift in mean age at marriage which rose from 21 years in 1992 to almost 23 years in 2006. Cohabitation was prevalent among those less than 30 years of age; the odds were higher in urban areas and increased since the year 1992. Be as it may marriage remained a persistent nuptiality pattern, and common among the less educated and employed, but had lower odds in urban areas. Multinomial regression results suggested that marital status was associated with age-at-first-marriage, total children born, region, place of residence, education level and religion. Marital patterns have undergone significant transformation over the past two decades in Namibia, with a coexistence of traditional marriage framework with co-habitation, and sizeable proportion of women remaining unmarried to the late 30s. An upward shift in the mean age is becoming distinctive in the Namibian society. Period and cohort effects in the timing of first sex were evident among women in Namibia. Efforts to discourage early sexual debut should be stepped up especially in North-Eastern Namibia. Results did not suggest a significant nonlinear pattern of age at first marriage with age, cohort and period. First marriage timing in Namibia…

Subjects/Keywords: Marital patterns ; Namibia ; Age-at-first marriage ; Families ; Marriage ; Unmarried couples

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pazvakawambwa, L. (2015). Multivariate statistical modelling of family formation processes among women in Namibia . (Thesis). University of Namibia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1603

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pazvakawambwa, L. “Multivariate statistical modelling of family formation processes among women in Namibia .” 2015. Thesis, University of Namibia. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1603.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pazvakawambwa, L. “Multivariate statistical modelling of family formation processes among women in Namibia .” 2015. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Pazvakawambwa L. Multivariate statistical modelling of family formation processes among women in Namibia . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Namibia; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1603.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pazvakawambwa L. Multivariate statistical modelling of family formation processes among women in Namibia . [Thesis]. University of Namibia; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1603

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Namibia

3. Haidula, Lea O. Psychological impact of premarital pregnancy on women's identity: a study of young adult women in rural Owambo communities .

Degree: 2004, University of Namibia

The aim of this study was threefold. Firstly, it aimed to find out how single, young adult women in rural Owambo communities appraised their premarital pregnancy at that time when they found out they were pregnant and subsequent reappraisals thereof. Secondly, it intended to investigate whether these women feel stigmatized, isolated and marginalized. Thirdly, the study also aimed at examining how the past and present perceptions of their premarital pregnancy have contributed to how they understand themselves today. The general research question for this study was: ‘Does premarital pregnancy impact on/affect a woman’s identity?’. In an attempt to answer this question and the above objectives, 5 women were recruited and interviewed. Only 2 of the interviews were translated, transcribed and used in the data presentation, analysis and discussion stages. In recruiting these women, the snowball technique was applied. The criteria for this sample was that women should have been aged between 22 and 40 years at the time they became pregnant, are employed and should have been working at the time they became pregnant, should still be single and have only one child aged from 2 years. Whitbourne’s (1985) model of the Psychological Construction of the Life-Span formed the basis for the theoretical conceptualization of this study. The study used the qualitative paradigm and employed the discourse analysis methodology as proposed by Ian Parker (1992) in its data analysis and data discussion phases. Since the study was an exploratory one in nature, it was not possible to draw definite conclusions from the data. However, indications are that immediate appraisals of a premarital pregnancy could range from being regrettable to being catastrophic. The data also seem to indicate that the more a “never-married-woman-with-children” identifies with the universal expectations of motherhood as tied to wifehood, the more she might feel stigmatized, isolated and marginalized in the event that she cannot meet this norm. The data also seem to indicate that competing discourses in present day Namibian society in general and Owambo communities in particular might lead to “never-married-women-with-children” in these communities expressing a self-identity that is torn in different directions. Overall, the study demonstrates how language reproduces and maintains culture and power in changing Owambo communities.

Subjects/Keywords: Premarital pregnancy ; Rural owambo communities ; Women identity ; Pregnancy, Namibia ; Marriage, Namibia ; Identity, Namibia ; Stigmatization, Namibia ; Dignity, Namibia ; Ovambo (African people), Namibia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haidula, L. O. (2004). Psychological impact of premarital pregnancy on women's identity: a study of young adult women in rural Owambo communities . (Thesis). University of Namibia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1613

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haidula, Lea O. “Psychological impact of premarital pregnancy on women's identity: a study of young adult women in rural Owambo communities .” 2004. Thesis, University of Namibia. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1613.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haidula, Lea O. “Psychological impact of premarital pregnancy on women's identity: a study of young adult women in rural Owambo communities .” 2004. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Haidula LO. Psychological impact of premarital pregnancy on women's identity: a study of young adult women in rural Owambo communities . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Namibia; 2004. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1613.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haidula LO. Psychological impact of premarital pregnancy on women's identity: a study of young adult women in rural Owambo communities . [Thesis]. University of Namibia; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11070/1613

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.