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University of Manchester

1. Davies, Heather. Mucins in the alimentary canal : their structure and interactions with polyphenols.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Manchester

The polymeric gel-forming mucins provide the structural framework of saliva and the mucus barriers that cover the mucosal surfaces of the alimentary canal. Dietary compounds may influence the barrier properties of these protective layers. The effects of green tea polyphenols, which have many health benefits but have low bioavailability and contribute to the astringency of green tea, on the structural properties of the mucins in the alimentary canal are investigated here. Using well characterised, highly purified salivary mucins MUC5B and MUC7, and porcine gastric mucins, the effects of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on mucins were studied here. Using rate-zonal centrifugation coupled to agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy and particle tracking microrheology, EGCG, at concentrations found in a cup of green tea, caused increased aggregation of MUC5B in human whole saliva, and increased aggregation and viscosity of purified MUC5B. It was revealed using recombinant proteins of the N- and C-terminal regions of MUC5B that EGCG had these effects by aggregating the terminal globular protein domains of MUC5B. In contrast, MUC5B trypsin-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptides were not aggregated by EGCG, demonstrating that the oligosaccharide-rich, highly-glycosylated regions of mucins are not involved in the EGCG-induced aggregation of mucins. EGCG also caused the majority of MUC7 in human whole saliva to aggregate, and purified MUC7 also showed substantial aggregation in the presence of EGCG.Porcine gastric mucins were also used in order to model human gastric mucins. First, the identity of the porcine gastric mucins was explored using tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. This revealed that Muc5ac was expressed by the surface epithelium and was the prominent mucin in porcine gastric mucus. Muc6 was expressed by gastric submucosal glands, but was not a major component of the secreted mucus barrier. Porcine Muc5ac and Muc6 were shown to be aggregated by EGCG. These data demonstrate that mucins from both saliva and the stomach are substantially altered by EGCG. This may contribute to the astringency and low bioavailability of EGCG. In contrast, the green tea polyphenol epicatechin (EC) did not cause aggregation of salivary mucins or porcine gastric mucins, suggesting that the galloyl ring of EGCG (which is absent in EC) is important for its aggregation of mucins, and that EC has different mechanisms of astringency. The structure of the mucins in the alimentary canal was studied using Raman spectroscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA) and Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The secondary structure of the oligosaccharide-rich regions of mucins was shown to be largely disordered, with some contribution of poly-proline II helix. The N- and C-terminal regions of MUC5B were largely β-sheet in structure, with some disordered structure also present in the C-terminal region. Raman spectroscopy could reliably distinguish between MUC5B glycoforms, demonstrating the…

Subjects/Keywords: 572; Mucin; Stomach; Mucus; Saliva; MUC5B; MUC7; Muc5ac; Muc6; Green tea polyphenols; Epigallocatechin-3-gallate; EGCG; Raman spectroscopy; Raman optical activity; Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Davies, H. (2014). Mucins in the alimentary canal : their structure and interactions with polyphenols. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/mucins-in-the-alimentary-canal-their-structure-and-interactions-with-polyphenols(76aaa531-bf78-4be1-94a7-c8b4db9114bb).html ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677729

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davies, Heather. “Mucins in the alimentary canal : their structure and interactions with polyphenols.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed September 26, 2020. https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/mucins-in-the-alimentary-canal-their-structure-and-interactions-with-polyphenols(76aaa531-bf78-4be1-94a7-c8b4db9114bb).html ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677729.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davies, Heather. “Mucins in the alimentary canal : their structure and interactions with polyphenols.” 2014. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Davies H. Mucins in the alimentary canal : their structure and interactions with polyphenols. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/mucins-in-the-alimentary-canal-their-structure-and-interactions-with-polyphenols(76aaa531-bf78-4be1-94a7-c8b4db9114bb).html ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677729.

Council of Science Editors:

Davies H. Mucins in the alimentary canal : their structure and interactions with polyphenols. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. Available from: https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/en/theses/mucins-in-the-alimentary-canal-their-structure-and-interactions-with-polyphenols(76aaa531-bf78-4be1-94a7-c8b4db9114bb).html ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.677729

2. Davies, Heather. Mucins in the alimentary canal: their structure and interactions with polyphenols.

Degree: 2014, University of Manchester

The polymeric gel-forming mucins provide the structural framework of saliva and the mucus barriers that cover the mucosal surfaces of the alimentary canal. Dietary compounds may influence the barrier properties of these protective layers. The effects of green tea polyphenols, which have many health benefits but have low bioavailability and contribute to the astringency of green tea, on the structural properties of the mucins in the alimentary canal are investigated here. Using well characterised, highly purified salivary mucins MUC5B and MUC7, and porcine gastric mucins, the effects of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on mucins were studied here.Using rate-zonal centrifugation coupled to agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy and particle tracking microrheology, EGCG, at concentrations found in a cup of green tea, caused increased aggregation of MUC5B in human whole saliva, and increased aggregation and viscosity of purified MUC5B. It was revealed using recombinant proteins of the N- and C-terminal regions of MUC5B that EGCG had these effects by aggregating the terminal globular protein domains of MUC5B. In contrast, MUC5B trypsin-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptides were not aggregated by EGCG, demonstrating that the oligosaccharide-rich, highly-glycosylated regions of mucins are not involved in the EGCG-induced aggregation of mucins. EGCG also caused the majority of MUC7 in human whole saliva to aggregate, and purified MUC7 also showed substantial aggregation in the presence of EGCG.Porcine gastric mucins were also used in order to model human gastric mucins. First, the identity of the porcine gastric mucins was explored using tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. This revealed that Muc5ac was expressed by the surface epithelium and was the prominent mucin in porcine gastric mucus. Muc6 was expressed by gastric submucosal glands, but was not a major component of the secreted mucus barrier. Porcine Muc5ac and Muc6 were shown to be aggregated by EGCG. These data demonstrate that mucins from both saliva and the stomach are substantially altered by EGCG. This may contribute to the astringency and low bioavailability of EGCG. In contrast, the green tea polyphenol epicatechin (EC) did not cause aggregation of salivary mucins or porcine gastric mucins, suggesting that the galloyl ring of EGCG (which is absent in EC) is important for its aggregation of mucins, and that EC has different mechanisms of astringency.The structure of the mucins in the alimentary canal was studied using Raman spectroscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA) and Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The secondary structure of the oligosaccharide-rich regions of mucins was shown to be largely disordered, with some contribution of poly-proline II helix. The N- and C-terminal regions of MUC5B were largely β-sheet in structure, with some disordered structure also present in the C-terminal region. Raman spectroscopy could reliably distinguish between MUC5B glycoforms, demonstrating the… Advisors/Committee Members: BLANCH, EWAN EW, Thornton, David, Blanch, Ewan.

Subjects/Keywords: Mucin; Stomach; Mucus; Saliva; MUC5B; MUC7; Muc5ac; Muc6; Green tea polyphenols; Epigallocatechin-3-gallate; EGCG; Raman spectroscopy; Raman optical activity; Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Davies, H. (2014). Mucins in the alimentary canal: their structure and interactions with polyphenols. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Manchester. Retrieved from http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:239764

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davies, Heather. “Mucins in the alimentary canal: their structure and interactions with polyphenols.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Manchester. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:239764.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davies, Heather. “Mucins in the alimentary canal: their structure and interactions with polyphenols.” 2014. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Davies H. Mucins in the alimentary canal: their structure and interactions with polyphenols. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:239764.

Council of Science Editors:

Davies H. Mucins in the alimentary canal: their structure and interactions with polyphenols. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Manchester; 2014. Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/escholar/uk-ac-man-scw:239764

3. Acharya, Shikha. On Characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients.

Degree: 2018, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet

Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a condition with unknown aetiology that is characterised by a chronic unremitting burning sensation in the oral mucosa. This condition, which affects mainly middle-aged and older women, presents major challenges to the patients, physicians, and researchers. The lack of both, objective diagnostic criteria and effective treatment strategies renders difficulties in the management of patients suffering from BMS. The aims of this thesis were to: characterise the clinical symptoms and associated factors described by the patients; compare the whole saliva and saliva on the oral mucosa; and compare the salivary components in the patients with BMS and in age- and sex-matched controls. In Paper I it was found that 37% of the patients with BMS reported to have a combination of burning and scalding sensation as the most common BMS symptom and 45% patients reported to sense taste disturbances. The mean severity of the BMS symptoms experienced by the patients, measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-100) was 66. The patients with BMS expressed lower levels of satisfaction with their general and oral health, life-situation and reported more medications, diseases/disorders, xerostomia, allergy, skin diseases, bruxofacets, and less amalgam fillings than did the controls. Multiple logistic regression analysis, however, revealed that xerostomia and skin diseases had strongest association to BMS. In Paper II we compared whole saliva and oral mucosal saliva along with the effects of medication on the salivary flow-rate and xerostomia in patients with BMS and in controls. It was found that BMS associated diseases/disorders and drug usage coincided with less saliva on the tongue and less whole saliva. Systemic diseases and medication usage, however, did not have a significant impact on xerostomia in patients with BMS. The effect of glycosylation of the salivary mucin MUC7 and the presence of inflammatory markers in patients with BMS and controls were examined in Paper III. Overall, the types of oligosaccharides found on MUC7 in BMS patients and controls were similar. However, quantitative analysis of the individual oligosaccharides showed lower levels of sialylated and fucosylated structures, especially Sialyl-Lewisx, in the patients with BMS. Analysis of inflammatory markers showed that patients with BMS represented a more heterogeneous group than the controls. This lead us to draw the conclusion that for some patients with BMS like symptoms, low-grade inflammation may be a contributing factor. This expands our knowledge of the clinical and salivary parameters associated with BMS. These studies are part of a larger project to design a disease model for BMS that would facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of patients with BMS in the future.

Subjects/Keywords: Burning Mouth Syndrome, Parafunction, Skin Diseases, Saliva, Drugs, Xerostomia, Mucins, MUC7, Sialyl-Lewisx; Parafunction; Skin diseases; Saliva; Drugs; Xerostomia; Mucins; MUC7; Sialyl -Lewis

…mucinet MUC7. Förändringen bestod utav att en speciell typ av kolhydrater, som innehåller Sialyl… …Flowmetry Q Questionnaires Mucin MUC7 Glycosylation Inflammatory markers Glycan neutrophil… …glycosylation of one of the important salivary mucins, MUC7 in the patients and the controls. It… …further characterised the specific MUC7 oligosaccharides in the participants. Additionally, the… …properties of saliva, with the aid of the salivary mucins MUC5B and MUC7, help to ease the friction… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Acharya, S. (2018). On Characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients. (Thesis). University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2077/55387

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Acharya, Shikha. “On Characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients.” 2018. Thesis, University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet. Accessed September 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2077/55387.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Acharya, Shikha. “On Characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients.” 2018. Web. 26 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Acharya S. On Characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2018. [cited 2020 Sep 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/55387.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Acharya S. On Characteristics of Burning Mouth Syndrome Patients. [Thesis]. University of Gothenburg / Göteborgs Universitet; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/55387

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.