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You searched for subject:(MEA absorption process). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Waterloo

1. Harun, Noorlisa. Dynamic Simulation of MEA Absorption Process for CO2 Capture from Power Plants.

Degree: 2012, University of Waterloo

A dynamic MEA absorption process model has been developed to study the operability of this process in a dynamic fashion and to develop a control strategy to maintain the operation of the MEA scrubbing CO2 capture process in the presence of the external perturbations that may arise from the transient operation of the power plant. The novelty in this work is that a mechanistic model based on the conservation laws of mass and energy have been developed for the complete MEA absorption process. The model developed in this work was implemented in gPROMS. The process response of the key output variables to changes in the key input process variables, i.e., the flue gas flow rate and the reboiler heat duty, are presented and discussed in this study. In order to represent the actual operation of a power plant, the dynamic response of the MEA absorption process to a sinusoidal change in the flue gas flow rate was also considered in the present analysis. The mechanistic dynamic model was applied to develop a basic feedback control strategy. The implementation of a control strategy was tested by changing the operating conditions for the flue gas flow rate. The controlled variables, i.e., the percentage of CO2 absorbed in the absorber column and the reboiler temperature, were maintained around their nominal set point values by manipulating the valve stem positions, which determine the lean solvent feed flow rate at the top of the absorber column, and the reboiler heat duty, respectively. For the sinusoidal test, the amplitude of the oscillations observed for the controlled variables was smaller than those observed for the open-loop tests. This is because the variability of the controlled variables was transferred to the manipulated variable in the closed loop. The mechanistic dynamic model developed in this process can be potentially used as a practical tool that can provide insight regarding the dynamic operation of MEA absorption process. The model developed in this work can also be used as a basis to develop other studies related to the operability, controllability and dynamic flexibility of this process.

Subjects/Keywords: dynamic simulation; MEA absorption process; CO2 capture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harun, N. (2012). Dynamic Simulation of MEA Absorption Process for CO2 Capture from Power Plants. (Thesis). University of Waterloo. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10012/6564

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harun, Noorlisa. “Dynamic Simulation of MEA Absorption Process for CO2 Capture from Power Plants.” 2012. Thesis, University of Waterloo. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10012/6564.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harun, Noorlisa. “Dynamic Simulation of MEA Absorption Process for CO2 Capture from Power Plants.” 2012. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Harun N. Dynamic Simulation of MEA Absorption Process for CO2 Capture from Power Plants. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Waterloo; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10012/6564.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harun N. Dynamic Simulation of MEA Absorption Process for CO2 Capture from Power Plants. [Thesis]. University of Waterloo; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10012/6564

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Loftus, Jonathan. Economic evaluation of burning bituminous and western PRB coals for power production based on select pollution control scenarios.

Degree: MS, 0231, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) finalized its Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and Clean Air Visibility Rule emission regulations in 2005, to limit emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter to the atmosphere. USEPA replaced CAIR with the Cross State Air Pollution Rule in August 2011. USEPA’s Clean Air Mercury Rule regulation was vacated by the D.C. Circuit Court in February of 2008; however, USEPA’s “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units” proposed in March 2011 further limits emissions of mercury to the atmosphere. As a result of these regulations, this study used the Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) to investigate the economic competitiveness of burning select blends of Illinois high-sulfur bituminous and western low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coals at pulverized coal (PC) power plants while meeting the air emission limitations in these regulations. Since power plants are one of the biggest emission sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) – a main greenhouse gas – and thus a target for potential CO2 regulations, 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas using a monoethanolamine (MEA) absorption process was also evaluated within the IECM study. Most existing CO2 capture systems utilize absorption-based technology, though it is an energy intensive process. The solid adsorption method has potential to be competitive with the MEA absorption process, regarding energy conversion efficiency for a PC power plant. Therefore, a second part of this study investigated a process using limestone to remove 90% of the CO2 emissions at a PC power plant. Simulation of the limestone process was performed using ChemCAD, as a “proof-of-concept” study with the goal of estimating the best-case energy use of the process at a PC power plant. The IECM study showed that the most cost-effective case scenario for PC power plants without CO2 capture, at the 2007 market coal costs, is an Illinois mine-mouth coal for a 650 MWe (gross) plant (67.0/MWh) and a 70/30 PRB/Illinois coal blend for a 175 MWe (gross) plant (95.0/MWh). The Illinois mine-mouth coal is most cost-effective for the 650 MWe case due primarily to its lower coal cost compared to the other coal types. The lower coal cost helps compensate for the higher SO2 control cost for the Illinois mine-mouth coal compared to the other coal types. The 70/30 PRB/Illinois coal blend replaces the Illinois mine-mouth as most cost-effective when the plant size is reduced to 175 MWe – even though the Illinois mine-mouth coal still has a lower coal cost compared to the other coal types – for the following reason: the SO2 and PM control costs for the Illinois mine-mouth case have a higher contribution to plant cost of electricity at the 175 MWe plant than at the 650 MWe plant, whereas these control costs for the 70/30 PRB/Illinois coal blend have essentially the same contribution to plant cost at both plant sizes. The most cost-effective case scenario for PC plants… Advisors/Committee Members: Rood, Mark J. (advisor), Lu, Yongqi (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: sulfur dioxide; nitrogen oxides; particulate matter (PM); mercury; coal; emissions; regulations; Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM); economic; bituminous; Powder River Basin (PRB); pulverized coal power plant; PC power plant; air emission limitation; carbon dioxide (CO2); greenhouse gas; carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations; carbon dioxide (CO2) capture; flue gas; monoethanolamine (MEA); absorption; solid adsorption; energy conversion efficiency; PC power plant; limestone; simulation; ChemCAD; energy use; cost-effective; coal cost; mine-mouth; coal blend; SO2 control; SO2 control cost; plant size; PM control; PM control cost; cost of electricity; carbon dioxide (CO2) control cost; carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions; auxiliary power use; limestone adsorption-desorption; Monoethanolamine (MEA) process; limestone process; carbon dioxide (CO2) compression; air separation unit (ASU); calcine; power loss; regeneration; carbonation reaction heat; high-temperature; recovered for producing steam used for additional electricity generation; net generation efficiency; managers of coal-fired power plants; cost-effective approach when burning select coals while simultaneously meeting stack emission regulations; law- and policy-makers; evaluate mining options; free-on-board mine costs; coal transportation costs; policy options concurrent with desired impacts on coal production and sales; assessing select CO2 control technologies regarding impact on energy conversion efficiency

…76 Table 12 Simulation Parameters for MEA Process… …24 Figure 8 Schematic of reference power plant with MEA process… …lb) CO2 by 2015.13 Chen et al estimated that employing the standard MEA process at a… …absorption for the pre-combustion (post-gasification) process where the separation… …The CO2 can then be removed by physical absorption or adsorption. The oxy-combustion process… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Loftus, J. (2012). Economic evaluation of burning bituminous and western PRB coals for power production based on select pollution control scenarios. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31010

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loftus, Jonathan. “Economic evaluation of burning bituminous and western PRB coals for power production based on select pollution control scenarios.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31010.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loftus, Jonathan. “Economic evaluation of burning bituminous and western PRB coals for power production based on select pollution control scenarios.” 2012. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Loftus J. Economic evaluation of burning bituminous and western PRB coals for power production based on select pollution control scenarios. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31010.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Loftus J. Economic evaluation of burning bituminous and western PRB coals for power production based on select pollution control scenarios. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31010

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.