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You searched for subject:(Lithium storage mechanism). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Huang, Shan. Nano-chemo-mechanics of advanced materials for hydrogen storage and lithium battery applications.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2011, Georgia Tech

Chemo-mechanics studies the material behavior and phenomena at the interface of mechanics and chemistry. Material failures due to coupled chemo-mechanical effects are serious roadblocks in the development of renewable energy technologies. Among the sources of renewable energies for the mass market, hydrogen and lithium-ion battery are promising candidates due to their high efficiency and easiness of conversion into other types of energy. However, hydrogen will degrade material mechanical properties and lithium insertion can cause electrode failures in battery owing to their high mobilities and strong chemo-mechanical coupling effects. These problems seriously prevent the large-scale applications of these renewable energy sources. In this thesis, the atomistic and continuum modeling are performed to study the chemical-mechanical failures. The objective is to understand the hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundary engineered metals and the lithium insertion-induced fracture in alloy electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. Hydrogen in metallic containment systems such as high-pressure vessels and pipelines causes the degradation of their mechanical properties that can result in sudden catastrophic fracture. A wide range of hydrogen embrittlement phenomena was attributed to the loss of cohesion of interfaces (between grains, inclusion and matrix, or phases) due to interstitially dissolved hydrogen. Our modeling and simulation of hydrogen embrittlement will address the question of why susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials can be markedly reduced by grain boundary engineering. Implications of our results for efficient hydrogen storage and transport at high pressures are discussed. Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials for Li-ion batteries (LIB) because of the highest known theoretical charge capacity. However, Si anodes often suffer from pulverization and capacity fading. This is caused by the large volume changes of Si (~300%) upon Li insertion/extraction close to the theoretical charging/discharging limit. In particular, large incompatible deformation between areas of different Li contents tends to initiate fracture, leading to electro-chemical-mechanical failures of Si electrodes. In order to understand the chemo-mechanical mechanisms, we begin with the study of basic fracture modes in pure silicon, and then study the diffusion induced deformation and fracture in lithiated Si. Results have implications for increasing battery capacity and reliability. To improve mechanical stability of LIB anode, failure mechanisms of silicon and coated tin-oxide nanowires have been studied at continuum level. It's shown that anisotropic diffusivity and anisotropic deformation play vital roles in lithiation process. Our predictions of fracture initiation and evolution are verified by in situ experiment observations. Due to the mechanical confinement of the coating layers, our study demonstrates that it is possible to simultaneously control the electrochemical reaction rate and the mechanical strain… Advisors/Committee Members: Zhu, Ting (Committee Chair), Gall, Ken (Committee Member), Jang, Seungsoon (Committee Member), Mcdowell, David (Committee Member), Pierron, Olivier (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Sillicon and germanium nanowire; Fuel cell; Graphene; Failure mechanism; In-situ TEM; Hard/soft chemistry; Lithium-ion battery; Hydrogen embrittlement; Nano-material; Multiscale modeling; Lithium cells; Renewable energy sources Mechanical properties; Renewable energy sources Analysis; Storage batteries

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Huang, S. (2011). Nano-chemo-mechanics of advanced materials for hydrogen storage and lithium battery applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42710

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huang, Shan. “Nano-chemo-mechanics of advanced materials for hydrogen storage and lithium battery applications.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42710.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huang, Shan. “Nano-chemo-mechanics of advanced materials for hydrogen storage and lithium battery applications.” 2011. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Huang S. Nano-chemo-mechanics of advanced materials for hydrogen storage and lithium battery applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42710.

Council of Science Editors:

Huang S. Nano-chemo-mechanics of advanced materials for hydrogen storage and lithium battery applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/42710


University of Queensland

2. Liu, Peng. Vanadium-oxide-based electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.

Degree: School of Chemical Engineering, 2017, University of Queensland

Subjects/Keywords: Lithium ion batteries; Cathode; V2O5; Nanostructure; Polymer coating; Doping; Carbon; Electrochemical properties; Lithium storage mechanism; 090403 Chemical Engineering Design; 090406 Powder and Particle Technology; 091205 Functional Materials

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, P. (2017). Vanadium-oxide-based electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. (Thesis). University of Queensland. Retrieved from http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:658045

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Peng. “Vanadium-oxide-based electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.” 2017. Thesis, University of Queensland. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:658045.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Peng. “Vanadium-oxide-based electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.” 2017. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Liu P. Vanadium-oxide-based electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:658045.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liu P. Vanadium-oxide-based electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2017. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:658045

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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