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You searched for subject:(Literate practice). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1. Kennett, Katrina Stearns. Experienced teachers’ planning practices: Orienting, inventing, and envisioning.

Degree: PhD, Curriculum and Instruction, 2017, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

Although every teacher plans for instruction, little is known about how this complex practice is accomplished in everyday contexts. The bulk of research on teacher planning has construed this core practice as process of mental decision making about a narrow collection of instructional factors. This study broadens the research on teacher planning practices by moving beyond these limiting frames by investigating the planning practices of eight elementary, middle, and high school teachers. To guide my study, I have assembled a three-part theoretical framework: literate activity (Prior, 1998), mediated agency (Wertsch, 1991), and distributed cognition (Hutchins, 1995). All three of these theories invite a more holistic framing of the work of teacher planning and situate it in everyday practice. I use qualitative methodology to better situate and understand teachers' choices in their contexts. The data collection for this study extended over the course of a K-12 academic year, during which time I conducted semi-structured interviews, conducted participant observations, wrote jottings and field notes, and collected artifacts of planning and instruction, including participant-created screencast think-alouds. Findings indicated that planning is a social and distributed process that accrues over time and that it is responsive to its context. Across these findings, planning entailed teachers articulating their own activity and student activity in relation to each other through three core practices: orienting, inventing, and envisioning. In sum, I argue that theoretical attention to the development of teachers’ practices can help researchers reconceptualize how we understand, study, and support planning for student learning and teacher development. Advisors/Committee Members: McCarthey, Sarah (advisor), McCarthey, Sarah (Committee Chair), Prior, Paul (committee member), Bresler, Liora (committee member), Mercier, Emma (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Teacher planning; Literate practice; Curriculum design

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APA (6th Edition):

Kennett, K. S. (2017). Experienced teachers’ planning practices: Orienting, inventing, and envisioning. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99312

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kennett, Katrina Stearns. “Experienced teachers’ planning practices: Orienting, inventing, and envisioning.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99312.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kennett, Katrina Stearns. “Experienced teachers’ planning practices: Orienting, inventing, and envisioning.” 2017. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kennett KS. Experienced teachers’ planning practices: Orienting, inventing, and envisioning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99312.

Council of Science Editors:

Kennett KS. Experienced teachers’ planning practices: Orienting, inventing, and envisioning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99312


Kent State University

2. Awad Scrocco, Diana Lin. An Examination of the Literate Practices of Resident Physicians and Attending Physician Preceptors in a Resident-Run Internal Medicine Clinic.

Degree: PhD, College of Arts and Sciences / Department of English, 2012, Kent State University

This dissertation considers resident physicians’ conversations with faculty physician preceptors and residents’ think-aloud reflections while composing chart notes to examine novice physicians’ literate practices. Using a composite of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, three studies contribute to a sociocognitive theory of resident physicians’ literate practices in a resident-run internal medicine clinic by exploring novices’ collaborative and independent literate activities. Assuming that writing and reading always involve social interaction, the analysis examines the “literate orientations” (Brandt, 1989) associated with these novices’ professional enculturation. More specifically, the first study uses institutional conversation analysis (Heritage, 2004) to examine the patterns in resident-preceptor interaction at different levels of residency training and to identify the institutional objectives in conversations about residents’ chart notes. This dissertation’s second study employs Aristotelian rhetoric to explore the argumentative structure, or topoi, used in resident-preceptor conversations to rehearse and model clinical logos and ethos. To explore the cognitive dimension of residents’ literate practices, the third study considers the rhetorical strategies residents use in their think-aloud protocol reflections while they compose chart notes in patients’ medical records. These three studies of residents’ conversations and independent reflections suggest that, from the first to the final year of residency novice physicians shift from relying on forensic rhetoric to using deliberative rhetoric; during this shift, they move from presenting concrete clinical knowledge and modeling preceptors’ suggestions to assuming clinical endoxa, or commonly accepted wisdom, while they independently contemplate nuanced concepts as more-seasoned professionals. Broadly, this dissertation’s explicit use of a rhetorical lens responds to calls by Atkinson (1995), Segal (2005), and others to employ rhetorical frameworks in studies physician-physician communication, a rarely studied area of clinical discourse. Because of the focus on literate practices, these studies also contribute to discussions of professional writing and reading and demonstrate the role of rhetoric in workplace reading, writing, and learning. Along with contributing to discussions of medical communication and professional literate practice, this dissertation offers a sociocognitive model that may facilitate teaching writing in the disciplines and medical education. Advisors/Committee Members: Newman, Sara (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Language; Linguistics; Literacy; medical rhetoric; medical education; institutional conversation analysis; literate practice; professional communication; classical rhetoric

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APA (6th Edition):

Awad Scrocco, D. L. (2012). An Examination of the Literate Practices of Resident Physicians and Attending Physician Preceptors in a Resident-Run Internal Medicine Clinic. (Doctoral Dissertation). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1334240629

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Awad Scrocco, Diana Lin. “An Examination of the Literate Practices of Resident Physicians and Attending Physician Preceptors in a Resident-Run Internal Medicine Clinic.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1334240629.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Awad Scrocco, Diana Lin. “An Examination of the Literate Practices of Resident Physicians and Attending Physician Preceptors in a Resident-Run Internal Medicine Clinic.” 2012. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Awad Scrocco DL. An Examination of the Literate Practices of Resident Physicians and Attending Physician Preceptors in a Resident-Run Internal Medicine Clinic. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Kent State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1334240629.

Council of Science Editors:

Awad Scrocco DL. An Examination of the Literate Practices of Resident Physicians and Attending Physician Preceptors in a Resident-Run Internal Medicine Clinic. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Kent State University; 2012. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1334240629


Brigham Young University

3. McCollum, Amanda J. Adolescent Literate Identity Online: Individuals and the Discourse of a Class Wiki.

Degree: MA, 2010, Brigham Young University

The purpose of this study was to examine students' representations of their literate identities in what Gee (2008) calls Discourse that developed among 105 high school students— 103 10th-grade and two 11th-grade students—using a wiki for class work, collaboration, and social interaction. The theoretical frame for the present study was drawn from of four bodies of literature. Through a reciprocal process of positioning self and others (van Langenhove & Harré, 1999), individuals come to form and display their literate identity (Heath, 1991) within a community of practice (Wenger, 1998). Their interactions reflect norms, values, and accepted ways of being within the Discourses to which they belong (Gee, 2008). Data analysis procedures employed in this study were similar to those commonly associated with qualitative data analysis. I used a recursive process of coding and searching for patterns and themes to analyze students' writing on the class wiki. Analysis of the wiki posts revealed that students employed 18 written devices within the Discourse of the wiki. In addition, within the online Discourse that emerged on the wiki, students occupied nine positions in relation to the others in the community. Findings of this study suggest that students developed a community of practice where norms for participation in the Discourse of the wiki were constructed by its members. Students represented their academic and social literate identities online through the combination of devices they used and the positions they enacted in the Discourse of the wiki.

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescence; Communities of Practice; Discourse; Literate Identity; New Literacies; Positioning Theory; Wiki; Teacher Education and Professional Development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCollum, A. J. (2010). Adolescent Literate Identity Online: Individuals and the Discourse of a Class Wiki. (Masters Thesis). Brigham Young University. Retrieved from https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3591&context=etd

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCollum, Amanda J. “Adolescent Literate Identity Online: Individuals and the Discourse of a Class Wiki.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Brigham Young University. Accessed October 15, 2019. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3591&context=etd.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCollum, Amanda J. “Adolescent Literate Identity Online: Individuals and the Discourse of a Class Wiki.” 2010. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

McCollum AJ. Adolescent Literate Identity Online: Individuals and the Discourse of a Class Wiki. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3591&context=etd.

Council of Science Editors:

McCollum AJ. Adolescent Literate Identity Online: Individuals and the Discourse of a Class Wiki. [Masters Thesis]. Brigham Young University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3591&context=etd

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