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You searched for subject:(Lightweight lattice structure). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Exeter

1. Hussein, Ahmed Yussuf. The development of lightweight cellular structures for metal additive manufacturing.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Exeter

Metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies in particular powder bed fusion processes such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) are capable of producing a fully-dense metal components directly from computer-aided design (CAD) model without the need of tooling. This unique capability offered by metal AM has allowed the manufacture of inter-connected lattice structures from metallic materials for different applications including, medical implants and aerospace lightweight components. Despite the many promising design freedoms, metal AM still faces some major technical and design barriers in building complex structures with overhang geometries. Any overhang geometry which exceeds the minimum allowable build angle must be supported. The function of support structure is to prevent the newly melted layer from curling due to thermal stresses by anchoring it in place. External support structures are usually removed from the part after the build; however, internal support structures are difficult or impossible to remove. These limitations are in contrast to what is perceived by designers as metal AM being able to generate all conceivable geometries. Because support structures consume expensive raw materials, use a considerable amount of laser consolidation energy, there is considerable interest in design optimisation of support structure to minimize the build time, energy, and material consumption. Similarly there is growing demand of developing more advanced and lightweight cellular structures which are self-supporting and manufacturable in wider range of cell sizes and volume fractions using metal AM. The main focuses of this research is to tackle the process limitation in metal AM and promote design freedom through advanced self-supporting and low-density Triply Periodic Minimal Surface (TPMS) cellular structures. Low density uniform, and graded, cellular structures have been developed for metal AM processes. This work presents comprehensive experimental test conducted in SLM and DMLS processes using different TPMS cell topologies and materials. This research has contributed to new knowledge in understanding the manufacturability and mechanical behaviour of TPMS cellular structures with varying cell sizes, orientations and volume fractions. The new support structure method will address the saving of material (via low volume cellular structures and easy removal of powder) and saving of energy (via reduced build-time).

Subjects/Keywords: 671; Additive manufacturing; Selective laser melting; Direct metal laser sintering; Cellular structures; Lattice structures; Support structure; Graded cellular structure; lightweight; sustainability

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APA (6th Edition):

Hussein, A. Y. (2013). The development of lightweight cellular structures for metal additive manufacturing. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Exeter. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10871/15023

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hussein, Ahmed Yussuf. “The development of lightweight cellular structures for metal additive manufacturing.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Exeter. Accessed January 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10871/15023.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hussein, Ahmed Yussuf. “The development of lightweight cellular structures for metal additive manufacturing.” 2013. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hussein AY. The development of lightweight cellular structures for metal additive manufacturing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Exeter; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10871/15023.

Council of Science Editors:

Hussein AY. The development of lightweight cellular structures for metal additive manufacturing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Exeter; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10871/15023

2. Gadipudi, Varun Kumar. Topology Optimization of Lightweight Structural Composites Inspired by Cuttlefish Bone.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2018, South Dakota State University

Lightweight material structure is a crucial subject in product design. The lightweight material has high strength to weight proportion which turns into an immense fascination and a territory of investigation for the researchers as its application is wide and expanding consistently. Lightweight composite material design is accomplished by choice of the cellular structure and its optimization. Cellular structure is utilized as it has wide multifunctional properties with lightweight characteristics. Unless it has been topologically optimized, each part in a assembly most likely weighs more than it needs to. Additional weight implies abundance materials are being utilized, loads on moving parts are higher than would normally be appropriate, energy effectiveness is being reduced and increase in costs. Presently, with Topology Optimization innovation, products can be design durable, lightweight for any kind of applications. In this thesis, the design and forecast of cellular structure's performance are presented for developing lightweight cellular composites strengthened by carbon fibers. A 3D cuttlefish bone structure inspired by bio material is presented. With help of topology optimization and finite element analysis, analysis was directed on different volume percentage to characterize the cellular structure for its strength and stiffness. In addition, non-linear analysis was conducted to examine the behavior of the cellular structure with an-isotropic properties. Advisors/Committee Members: Zhong Hu.

Subjects/Keywords: 3D periodic block; cuttlefish bone; Discontinuous fiber; reinforced polymer composites; Lightweight lattice structure; Topology optimization; Materials Science and Engineering; Mechanical Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gadipudi, V. K. (2018). Topology Optimization of Lightweight Structural Composites Inspired by Cuttlefish Bone. (Masters Thesis). South Dakota State University. Retrieved from https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/2442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gadipudi, Varun Kumar. “Topology Optimization of Lightweight Structural Composites Inspired by Cuttlefish Bone.” 2018. Masters Thesis, South Dakota State University. Accessed January 29, 2020. https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/2442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gadipudi, Varun Kumar. “Topology Optimization of Lightweight Structural Composites Inspired by Cuttlefish Bone.” 2018. Web. 29 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Gadipudi VK. Topology Optimization of Lightweight Structural Composites Inspired by Cuttlefish Bone. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 29]. Available from: https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/2442.

Council of Science Editors:

Gadipudi VK. Topology Optimization of Lightweight Structural Composites Inspired by Cuttlefish Bone. [Masters Thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2018. Available from: https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/2442

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