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You searched for subject:(Lieutenant of Inishmore). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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The Ohio State University

1. Farrelly, Ann Dillon. “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh.

Degree: PhD, Theatre, 2004, The Ohio State University

This dissertation focuses on the work of the new Irish playwright, Martin McDonagh, and where he fits in the rich tradition of Irish drama. The specific focus is an exploration of each of McDonagh’s five produced plays on Ireland: The Beauty Queen of Leenane, A Skull in Connemara, The Lonesome West, The Cripple of Inishmaan, and The Lieutenant of Inishmore. By tracing through the history of Irish drama from the establishment of the Irish Literary Theatre at the turn of the century to Friel and on to the present, this dissertation demonstrates how McDonagh’s drama offers a new voice for Ireland. This dissertation focuses on a few key individuals and their “benchmark” plays which laid the groundwork for McDonagh: W. B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, and J. M. Synge, Sean O’Casey, Samuel Beckett, and Brian Friel. In addition, this dissertation examines the notion of Irish identity and what that has meant to the other Irish playwrights. McDonagh’s plays have developed a reputation for being dark and desperate comedies that shine a light on the wickedness of the human spirit. This dissertation takes issue with those misinterpretations and focuses on the empowering nature of McDonagh’s message. Within each play, McDonagh creates exaggerated worlds in which the people defy tradition and invent their own moral codes. These exaggerated communities exist to teach the audience—and, more specifically, the Irish people—that they are no longer required to let the traditional power structures control their lives. In the worlds created by McDonagh, the people truly are the masters of their fate and the captains of their soul. McDonagh’s plays explore what it means to be human through the centering of the following four binaries: faith and reason, autonomy and responsibility, humans and nature, and individual and community. While the Irish drama of the past has illustrated how the Irish people have always privileged one side of each binary, McDonagh’s characters have negotiated these binaries and found the peaceful center. Advisors/Committee Members: Reilly, Joy (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, Modern; Theater; Martin McDonagh; Irish; Ireland; Irish drama; Irish theatre; theatre; Beauty Queen of Leenane; Skull in Connemara; Lonesome West; Lieutenant of Inishmore; Cripple of Inishmaan; Banshees of Inisheer; Pillowman; Irishness; Irish Identity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farrelly, A. D. (2004). “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farrelly, Ann Dillon. ““It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farrelly, Ann Dillon. ““It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh.” 2004. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Farrelly AD. “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442.

Council of Science Editors:

Farrelly AD. “It depends on the fella. And the cat.”: Negotiating humanness through the myth of Irish identity in the plays of Martin McDonagh. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2004. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1086104442

2. Shalom, Lindsay. Functional Violence in Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman.

Degree: MA, Department of Literature and Philosophy, 2015, Georgia Southern University

While Martin McDonagh’s plays have engendered laughter, disgust, and fear, he might be best known as part of a long line of Irish playwrights who faced controversy due to their art. Much like Synge, Shaw, and O’Casey, McDonagh has faced criticism and even outrage due to the violence and misunderstood portrayals of the Irish in his plays. Though the violence in plays like The Pillowman and The Lieutenant of Inishmore has been labeled gratuitous, we might better understand the purpose of that violence by examining them in light of Michel Foucault’s concepts of knowledge and power. Foucault’s approaches best highlight one of McDonagh’s most important themes: the establishment of a power dynamic between characters. Foucault’s analysis of the development and interaction of power structures in society, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, clarifies the violence of McDonagh’s plays, and might add depth and greater meaning to his use of extreme violence. Advisors/Committee Members: Joe Pellegrino, Howard Keeley.

Subjects/Keywords: McDonagh; Irish; Violence; Foucault; Modern Theatre; The Lieutenant of Inishmore; The Pillowman; Celtic Studies; European Languages and Societies; History of Philosophy; Literature in English, British Isles; Philosophy; Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies, Electronic Theses & Dissertations, ETDs, Student Research

…The Lieutenant of Inishmore is set on the largest of the Aran Islands off of the west coast… …previously established power dynamics is also seen in McDonagh’s The Lieutenant of Inishmore and… …The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman explore the violent religious and social… …Bowring. 23 Padraic calls himself the Lieutenant of Inishmore because he believes he is… …This criticism especially addresses McDonagh’s play The Lieutenant of Inishmore and its… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shalom, L. (2015). Functional Violence in Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1348

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shalom, Lindsay. “Functional Violence in Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed July 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1348.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shalom, Lindsay. “Functional Violence in Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman.” 2015. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Shalom L. Functional Violence in Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1348.

Council of Science Editors:

Shalom L. Functional Violence in Martin McDonagh's The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Pillowman. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2015. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1348

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