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You searched for subject:(Leaf litter invertebrates). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Humboldt State University

1. Best, Michael. Ecological role of the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii: direct impacts on the arthropod assemblage and indirect influence on the carbon cycle in mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Northwestern California.

Degree: MS, Natural Resources: Wildlife, 2012, Humboldt State University

Terrestrial salamanders are the most abundant vertebrate predators in northwestern California forests, fulfilling a vital role converting invertebrate to vertebrate biomass. The most common of these salamanders in northwestern California is the salamander Ensatina (Ensatina eschsccholtzii). I examined the top-down effects of Ensatina on leaf litter invertebrates, and how these effects influence the relative amount of leaf litter retained for decomposition, thereby fostering the input of carbon and nutrients to the forest soil. The experiment ran during the wet season (November - May) of two years (2007-2009) in the Mattole watershed of northwest California. In Year One results revealed a top-down effect on multiple invertebrate taxa, resulting in a 13% difference in litter weight. The retention of more leaf litter on salamander plots was attributed to Ensatina???s selective removal of large invertebrate shedders (beetle and fly larva) and grazers (beetles, springtails, and earwigs), which also enabled small grazers (mites; barklice in year two) to become more numerous. Ensatina???s predation modified the composition of the invertebrate assemblage by shifting the densities of members of a key functional group (shredders) resulting in an overall increase in leaf litter retention. Results from year two indicated that these effects were affected by moisture availability, and that direct salamander impacts on invertebrates, and the related indirect effects on the capacity for forest floor leaf litter retention were diminished in the second, wetter year. Advisors/Committee Members: Welsh, Hartwell H..

Subjects/Keywords: Salamanders; Ensatina; Carbon; Leaf litter; Food web; Trophic cascades; Invertebrates; Plethodontidae

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Best, M. (2012). Ecological role of the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii: direct impacts on the arthropod assemblage and indirect influence on the carbon cycle in mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Northwestern California. (Masters Thesis). Humboldt State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2148/1033

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Best, Michael. “Ecological role of the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii: direct impacts on the arthropod assemblage and indirect influence on the carbon cycle in mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Northwestern California.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Humboldt State University. Accessed September 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2148/1033.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Best, Michael. “Ecological role of the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii: direct impacts on the arthropod assemblage and indirect influence on the carbon cycle in mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Northwestern California.” 2012. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Best M. Ecological role of the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii: direct impacts on the arthropod assemblage and indirect influence on the carbon cycle in mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Northwestern California. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Humboldt State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2148/1033.

Council of Science Editors:

Best M. Ecological role of the salamander Ensatina eschscholtzii: direct impacts on the arthropod assemblage and indirect influence on the carbon cycle in mixed hardwood/conifer forest in Northwestern California. [Masters Thesis]. Humboldt State University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2148/1033


University of Western Australia

2. Denmead, Lisa H. The impact of land-use intensification on the conservation management of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes.

Degree: MS, 2012, University of Western Australia

Land-use intensification is increasing worldwide as the need for resources grows along with the human population. The increased inputs and animal stocking rates that are part of increasing yields in production systems have negative impacts on farmland. However, farmer inputs are not static and can spill-over into adjacent natural systems, sometimes with harmful consequences. Actions taken to spare land for conservation will be compromised if spill-over from surrounding land-use inhibits recovery of the system. In the first half of my thesis I investigated the relative benefits of livestock exclusion for conservation of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes of varying land-use intensity in the Waikato region, New Zealand. I measured detritivore invertebrate communities and leaf-litter decomposition rates in 11 fenced and 10 unfenced native forest remnants on farmland that varied in land-use intensity. Livestock exclusion was highly beneficial to detritivore communities under all land-use intensities. But surprisingly, the observed variation in detritivore community composition was independent of changes in land-use intensification in both fenced and unfenced remnants and therefore the relative benefit of fencing did not change with landuse intensity. These results have positive implications for land spared for conservation in New Zealand.

I tested the mechanistic drivers of livestock trampling impacts on land snail communities in the second half of my thesis, using an artificial trampling experiment conducted in a fenced forest remnant. I used a factorial combination of litter manipulation and trampling treatments to partition different causal drivers of livestock impacts on land snail communities, and relate treatment differences to covariance in five environmental variables which are impacted by livestock. Even the lowest intensity treatment caused severe changes to snail communities. The underlying drivers varied, but are primarily due to changes in litter mass and the effects of unknown mediating variables that were not measured in the experiment. The results suggest that even a minimal amount of stock access will cause significant impacts on snail communities, and should be discouraged. The results also further support the need to maintain livestock exclusion as a priority conservation management action for forest remnants on farmland.

Land-use intensification is increasing worldwide as the need for resources grows along with the human population. The increased inputs and animal stocking rates that are part of increasing yields in production systems have negative impacts on farmland. However, farmer inputs are not static and can spill-over into adjacent natural systems, sometimes with harmful consequences. Actions taken to spare land for conservation will be compromised if spill-over from surrounding land-use inhibits recovery of the system. In the first half of my thesis I investigated the relative benefits of livestock exclusion for conservation of native forest remnants…

Subjects/Keywords: Land use intensification; Mollusca; Conservation management; Leaf litter invertebrates; Livestock exclusion; Land sparing; Livestock trampling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Denmead, L. H. (2012). The impact of land-use intensification on the conservation management of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes. (Masters Thesis). University of Western Australia. Retrieved from http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=33709&local_base=GEN01-INS01

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Denmead, Lisa H. “The impact of land-use intensification on the conservation management of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Western Australia. Accessed September 19, 2019. http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=33709&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Denmead, Lisa H. “The impact of land-use intensification on the conservation management of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes.” 2012. Web. 19 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Denmead LH. The impact of land-use intensification on the conservation management of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Western Australia; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 19]. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=33709&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

Council of Science Editors:

Denmead LH. The impact of land-use intensification on the conservation management of native forest remnants embedded within production landscapes. [Masters Thesis]. University of Western Australia; 2012. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=33709&local_base=GEN01-INS01

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