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You searched for subject:(Latino mathematics classrooms). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas State University – San Marcos

1. Mejia Colindres, Carlos Alberto. The Role of Translanguaging in Latino Mathematics Classrooms.

Degree: PhD, Mathematics Education, 2015, Texas State University – San Marcos

Given the concerns about the mathematics achievement gap between Latinos and their majority counterparts, and since English learners (ELs) are an important percentage of Latino students in schools today, it is important to investigate the characteristics of teachers in Latino school districts that have significantly narrowed the mathematics achievement gap in the past. This dissertation is a collective case study of three middle school mathematics teachers participating in a larger project, CAREER: Mathematics Instruction for English Language Learners (MIELL). The three participants spoke English and Spanish with different levels of proficiency, and taught in a South Texas school district that has shown important achievements in the mathematics performance of its Latino students. This case study focused on the participants’ (a) family background and preparation, (b) support of students’ first language, (c) beliefs on the cognitive advantages of bilingualism in mathematics, and (d) use of two languages (or translanguaging) in mathematics. Data was collected by means of interviews with the teacher participants and nine classroom videos (three per participant) made during the 2013-2014 academic year. Interviews were analyzed by means of typological analysis and based on topics found in the fields of bilingual education, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and mathematics education. The translanguaging events observed in the participants’ videos were coded according to the strategies utilized by the teacher and the teaching goals linked to those strategies. The teacher participants were highly educated middle school mathematics teachers who had diverse family backgrounds. The aforementioned characteristics influenced the participants’ points of view on the cognitive advantages of bilingualism in mathematics and some of their practices in the classroom. The three participants in the study used a variety of linguistic strategies that qualified as translanguaging during their mathematics instruction, including cognate use, collaborative grouping, previewing, revoicing, stimulus of inner speech, and student paraphrasing. These strategies were used to make sense of the content and to elicit students’ thinking, but not necessarily to support students’ first language. The teaching strategies involving translanguaging identified and described in this case study are relevant to practice, since they can be used by any teacher in any linguistically diverse classroom. Advisors/Committee Members: Obara, Samuel (advisor), Cuevas, Gilbert (committee member), Huerta, Mary Esther (committee member), White, Alexander (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Translanguaging; English learners; Latino mathematics classrooms; Texas; Middle school; Bilingual teachers; Code-switching; Mathematics – Study and teaching – Texas; English languages – Study and teaching – Foreign speakers; Bilingualism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mejia Colindres, C. A. (2015). The Role of Translanguaging in Latino Mathematics Classrooms. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5753

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mejia Colindres, Carlos Alberto. “The Role of Translanguaging in Latino Mathematics Classrooms.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5753.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mejia Colindres, Carlos Alberto. “The Role of Translanguaging in Latino Mathematics Classrooms.” 2015. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Mejia Colindres CA. The Role of Translanguaging in Latino Mathematics Classrooms. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5753.

Council of Science Editors:

Mejia Colindres CA. The Role of Translanguaging in Latino Mathematics Classrooms. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2015. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5753

2. Zavala, Maria del Rosario. Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Washington

Decades of research document underperformance of Latino/a youth in mathematics, yet little is known about the day-to-day mathematics socialization of Latino/a youth. This research used qualitative case studies of two Algebra 1 classrooms and seven Latino/a focal students to document and describe two major influences on Latino/a youths' mathematics identities: their individual beliefs and their negotiation of identity in classroom settings. I proposed a three-tiered framework for mathematics identity drawing on students' self-concepts, sociocultural learning theory, and Critical Race Theory (CRT) to research the perspectives Latino/a students had about their own mathematics identities. This study focused on how Latino/a students described the role of language and race in learning mathematics, how Latino/a youth exhibited agency in their mathematics educations, and the role of different features of mathematics classrooms in negotiating their mathematics identities. Findings from students' perspectives suggest racial identity plays a role in the mathematics identity negotiation for Latino/a students in complex ways. Some students readily named stereotypes around Asian students as being high achieving, and then positioned Latino/as as lower achieving. Linguistic identity played a key role in how one pair of focal students in each classroom engaged in strategic partnerships and how they displayed agency – for one student in her own mathematics identity, and for the other student in an attempt to help her partner learn algebra. The findings from the classroom analysis suggest that attending to multiple aspects of classroom practice can provide insight into how Latino/a youth negotiate their mathematics identities in classrooms, and that the proposed aspects of classroom practice may be a useful analytic framework for classroom research. The findings contribute to important dimensions to attend to in the mathematics identity development and classroom socialization experiences of Latino/a youth, and highlight the potential value of CRT in research on mathematics identity. The frameworks proposed could contribute to equity projects focused on the experiences of Latino/a youth and youth from other communities historically marginalized by schooling. Advisors/Committee Members: Kazemi, Elham (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: agency; classrooms; Critical Race Theory; engagement; identity; Latino; Mathematics education; Latin American studies; Educational psychology; Education - Seattle

mathematics identities in classrooms. In particular for Latino/a youth, findings from these two… …literature on mathematics classrooms and the engagement of Latino/a students, literature on… …identity to analyze the experiences of Latino/a youth in mathematics classrooms. This framework… …research on how Latino/a students’ participation in mathematics classrooms informs their… …shifting the discourse around Latino/a youth’s experiences in mathematics classrooms by framing… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zavala, M. d. R. (2012). Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/20830

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zavala, Maria del Rosario. “Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/20830.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zavala, Maria del Rosario. “Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth.” 2012. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Zavala MdR. Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/20830.

Council of Science Editors:

Zavala MdR. Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/20830

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